tech

Apple sued in China over showing of war film from the 1990s

17 Comments
By LOUISE WATT

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In May, a Beijing intellectual property tribunal in Beijing ordered Apple to stop selling its iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in the city after finding they look too much like a model made by a small Chinese brand.

You mean to tell me Apple is in trouble for making it's own brand, and the knock-off is more important?

10 ( +10 / -0 )

The plaintiff wants the two companies to immediately stop broadcasting the film and is seeking compensation of 50,000 yuan ($7,500) plus its “reasonable expenditure” of 20,158 yuan ($3,000) in attempting to stop the infringement of its rights, the court said.

$10,500 off Apple

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You mean to tell me Apple is in trouble for making it's own brand, and the knock-off is more important?

Pretty standard practice in China. There is no such thing as a level playing field in that country. The use of the logo would not happen in any other country in the world without being sued by Apple, but in China, the system is always against you.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Perhaps, before asking Apple to pay, they could get some of the local Chinese to front up with the billions of dollars lost by Western firms through copyright infringements over the years. Oh yes, and of course you can rip off the logo by all means. I mean that just goes without saying, doesn't it. The real story here is Apple has not been paying off the right people while it's competition has.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Strange and incompatible bedfellows generally look different once the bloom wears off.

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China?? Complaining about infringement of copyrights? Hilarious!!

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What has china "invented" in the last 50-100 years? China has "copied" or "stolen" all the tech it uses. So China is going to rule the world? When the chinese government "tells" you what to think.Ha!Ha!Ha!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Don't be surprised about the iPhone thing. China even allows Chinese companies to register (steal) established global brand names and trademarks, including the oldest guitar company in the world, Martin guitars. It's shameless. And the world (WTO, etc) let's these jokers get away with it?!

http://theunofficialmartinguitarforum.yuku.com/topic/110494/Chinese-company-legally-steals-CFMartin?page=1#.V3ghIqRTGM8

5 ( +5 / -0 )

China will keep suing Apple for any reason and copy everything until it has no more use for it. There's no advantage to business in China if it means losing all your IP and future.

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Why any company in the world would want to do business in China is absolutely baffling. Any concepts of copyright, trademark, and simple fair play are held hostage to a convoluted belief that China has some sort of "right" to rip off the world -- all part of a perceived victimization at the hand of said world over the last two centuries. "You treated us badly, so we aren't obliged to play by any rules." Or the less-well-known "Two wrongs absolutely make things right" school of thought. What makes it worse is this kind of thinking drives and engine whose operators still firmly believe China is the Middle Kingdom of the world by right.

This is but one more reason why unfettered capitalism is such a corrosive thing. Western companies and manufacturers flock to politically immoral black holes like China for cheap labor, not really seeming to care that they are handing the keys to the kingdom over on a plate in exchange for quick, immediate profit.

That small, unknown tech company in China that sued Apple for having a design that resembled it's one? Where do you think the small, unknown tech company got their original design? From Apple. And it's abundantly clear the Chinese (coff! coff!) "legal system" had not desire to defend truth in any way, shape, or form. There is but one truth, and that China can and will do what it likes to gain advantage.

This willingness to do business in a country notorious for its blatant disregard for trademarks and copyrights is widespread. The end result? A wholly corrupt political and economic system, fueled by nationalist claptrap, gaining the financial resources necessary for scrabbling to the top of the pile, one broken law, treaty, or agreement at a time.

You can be certain that when China gets to the top, it will not immediately and magnanimously change its message to, "Hey, now that we're at the top, let's let bygone be bygones.” China is never going to play by any commonly accepted norm for fair play as long as the willingness to cheat is so firmly ingrained in the highest levels of government.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

These greedy western countries are finding out, very painfully, just what the chinese are all about. Britain was saved by Brexet!

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@LFRAgainJUL. 03, 2016 - 09:50AM JST

I agree. The biggest strategic mistake the West made with China is that they did not ensure its sense of rights grew before its economy did.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

dont worry the chinese play by the same rules in australia as soon as there are enough of them to break the rule of law and get away with it.direspect is the norm

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Lived in China 11 years , I know everything there is fake

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Maybe there needs to be a global ban against chinese products. That'll straighten out the chinese attitude.

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Ban Chinese made products and shops, supers and departments will not have much stock.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Lived in China 11 years , I know everything there is fake

I do not need to live in China to know that. Just google, you can see a lot of things, from fake eggs (which I want to buy one as it is kind of a fine modeling work to industrial strength chemicals in the food - eat at your own risk. I have so many co-worker from HK telling me to avoid food from China.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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