Photo: NTT Docomo
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China Mobile, NTT Docomo to launch world's first IoT multi-vendor eSIM solution

9 Comments

China Mobile and NTT Docomo on Monday will launch an eSIM1 solution to enable cross-vendor SIM profile switching from Docomo to China Mobile.

This solution allows Docomo customers from Japan with IoT equipment in China to switch the mobile numbers (profiles) of their IoT equipment from Docomo to China Mobile even with different SIM vendors adopted by the two operators, thus eliminating the need to replace physical SIM cards.

Up until now, different mobile operators were required to use the same vendor to overwrite eSIM profiles when switching between their mobile networks. The new GSMA 3.1 specifications adopted by this eSIM solution, however, allow the overwriting of eSIM information of operators who use different SIM vendors, making this the world's first multi-vendor eSIM system.

By doing away with the need to replace physical SIM cards, the new system will enable smooth switching between mobile networks when companies send connected automobiles or construction, agriculture or production machinery from Japan for use in China.

Docomo commercialized the eSIM solution in 2014 and launched a commercial service with Telefonica Brasil S.A. (Vivo) in 2015. Docomo and China Mobile International signed an IoT Service Agreement including eSIM solution in November 2017. Docomo has also been pursuing various eSIM projects through partnerships with international mobile operators including IoT World Alliance, SCFA and Conexus5. Gradual expansion to Europe, Asia, Middle East and America is planned.

1 eSIM (Embedded Subscriber Identity Module): Solution enabling switching between mobile operators remotely. Traditional solutions require the manual replacement of SIM cards.

© Japan Today

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9 Comments
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Yes. Good. More around the world please.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Belrick

Its for corporate customers running IoT services, ie industrial use.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Silvafan, I think you will find that it is the US government that demands US software and hardware manufacturers install backdoors and spy on customers. I suspect some Chinese products telecoms products were banned because they did not provide the US govenrment with backdoors.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

silvafan:

but whenever I think of Chinese tech products, I remember their government being accused of using back doors in their hardware and software to spy on customers.

Ha, you think China is the only country doing that? If America can spy on the governments of its 'allies', then you can be sure they're doing to same to ordinary folks.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yet the cross international carrier extortionate fees will remain, so calling mobile to international mobile will remain prohibitively expensive without resorting to using a dedicated IP service.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

 want to think positive, but whenever I think of Chinese tech products, I remember their government being accused of using back doors in their hardware and software to spy on customers. It was one of the reasons that they were banned in the US.

Europeans should be more worried about the activities os so called 'friends' or allies.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/09/nsa-gchq-illegal-european-parliamentary-inquiry

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Might be time for me to consider ending my contract with DoCoMo.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I want to think positive, but whenever I think of Chinese tech products, I remember their government being accused of using back doors in their hardware and software to spy on customers. It was one of the reasons that they were banned in the US.

Poor brainwashed soul.... Another victim of American propaganda.

Might be time for me to consider ending my contract with DoCoMo.

Yes, please. Hurry it up.

Silvafan, I think you will find that it is the US government that demands US software and hardware manufacturers install backdoors and spy on customers. I suspect some Chinese products telecoms products were banned because they did not provide the US govenrment with backdoors.

Spot on.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I want to think positive, but whenever I think of Chinese tech products, I remember their government being accused of using back doors in their hardware and software to spy on customers. It was one of the reasons that they were banned in the US.

I see them both spreading throughout Africa and Latin America.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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