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Ex-SpaceJet engineer trains next generation after project freeze

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This course is meaningful for not only those who related with airplain industry but also those in other fields. Learning from fails is really important. succeseful people did.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This is pointless, since Japan will never develop another civilian commercial jet again. Japan will have to settle for being subcontractor to Boeing/Airbus for civilian jets and BAE for the Japanese variant of Tempest fighter jet, which will be 70% foreign due to British input on central fuselage, engines, and radar. This is just the announced portion and more announcements are coming.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Actually the United States did not accept MRJ homologation because they did not want a new Toyota.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

This is pointless, since Japan will never develop another civilian commercial jet again. Japan will have to settle for being subcontractor 

The aviation press all says that the Spacejet is not dead, and the Spacejet 90 test program is so close to finished that version should eventually be built once air travel returns to pre-pandemic levels. The difficulties Mitsubishi faced shows the value of taking on an experienced partner to guide you through your first go with the US FAA certification process. There are orders for 157 Spacejet 90s and they have not been cancelled. One large order was cancelled because of something called a "scope clause". What that means is that the pilots union of a major airline has a clause in its contract limiting the passenger capacity of the aircraft flown by the regional airlines partnered with the major. That had nothing to do with the merits of the aircraft.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually the United States did not accept MRJ homologation because they did not want a new Toyota.

No. I have not been involved in a certification program for a new aircraft (I was peripherally involved in one for a big helicopter being adapted to commercial long line heavy external lift work with FAA engineers in the field with us as we modified this big helo to reinforce the airframe as our heavy lift work created cracks in ribs), but I have seen some very big, experienced and well regarded foreign conglomerates fail a source selection for a US Government contract miserably because language barriers and unfamiliarity with American government processes. They probably had a good product, in fact I am sure they did, but their documentation was so bad our contracting and source selection rules forced us to disqualify them. The documentation requirements are very rigid. Everyone knows what they are up front but for a foreign firm the technical English used in the request for proposal documents is not easy for foreigners to understand. Even experienced US firms need attorneys to study it carefully. If we had not disqualified them the other competitors who did present complete packages in the letter perfect format with all the i's dotted and t's crossed would have dropped protests in a New York nanosecond and out source selection would have likely ended up in a courtroom somewhere. Had that big foreign conglomerate taken on a US firm in the same line of business as a partner, the US partner could have taught them how to put together the documentation correctly.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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