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GM: New batteries cut electric car costs, increase range

19 Comments
By TOM KRISHER

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Go General!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

GM lowering the cost of anything is funny. Why just the other day they lowered the boom on Teams again...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@rdemers

GM lowering the cost of anything is funny. Why just the other day they lowered the boom on Teams again...

GM is good enough for Honda to borrow an EV platform from, not the other way around.

Parks said. The new battery cells also will be used by Honda, which is partnering with GM and battery cell supplier LG Chem of Korea.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I will believe it when I see it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Come back to me when you can recharge a EV battery in 5 minutes

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Come back to me when you can recharge a EV battery in 5 minutes

they do that now in China with a complete battery swap. Now Tesla are trying to restart the same process

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1Ld5WByT34

5 ( +5 / -0 )

This is very good news. However,

GM made a very big mistake in not taking the EV ball and running with it. Back in the 1990s, California's government mandated that major automakers must start coming out with electric personal vehicles. GM responded with the EV-1. I used to see them on the road pretty often back then, and as far as I could tell, they were the only ones with an EV on the road. George Bush's administration joined the major US automakers in their suit to get California to stop making the majors make EVs, and the rest is history. GM had put the EV-1 on the road as a leased vehicle. Once they no longer had to have them on the road, they recalled the leases and destroyed every last electric vehicle. You can't even find one in a museum, when they used to be ubiquitous on the roads around here.

So, now we have Tesla eating their lunch, and GM is a distant also-ran, when at one time they were the front-runner. They have no one to blame but themselves for this lost opportunity. They have been obsessed with making low mileage internal combustion engine powered vehicles for over a hundred years.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

An anecdote about manufacturers meeting the US Environmental Protection Agency's rules for vehicles......I met a man who worked as an engineer for GM in the vehicle emission laboratory in Van Nuys, California. That was a long time ago, it may be gone now. Certainly he is retired. Anyway, he told me that the Big Three (GM, Ford, and Chrysler) had jointly told the US government that they could not meet the EPA's rules, and that they absolutely needed more time to work on meeting the clean air and fuel efficiency standards that had been laid out for them to meet. Low and behold, the Swedes came along told the EPA that they would be able to meet the new standards, no problem. The Swedes joined a catalytic converter with computer controlled fuel injection, and met both the American clean air standards and the fuel efficiency standards. My acquaintance told me that the Big Three were willing to pay the Swedes big time in order to copy what they had done, but the Swedes said that anyone could copy their technology, for free. Anyway, that is the story as I remember him telling it to me. I have looked on the internet, and you won't find any stories like that, but he was in a position to know, and that is what he told me.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

All these electric cars have one common problem, recharging!

It takes too long and places where it can be done are few and far apart. If your car's battery runs out, you can't exactly call a cab go to the nearest DIY place and buy a replacement. Where I live, there is an Aeon mall and it has only 3 charging stations in a car park for 500+ cars. The car dealers, only have 1 or 2 charging stations usually one high power and one low power. If one counts how many cars come to a gas station on a main road in half an hour, you will realize it is a huge problem to overcome if it takes 30 minutes to charge one car and this problem must be addressed before mass adoption of electric cars can happen.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Samit BasuToday  08:50 am JST

GM is good enough for Honda to borrow an EV platform from, not the other way around.

Honda doesn't produce an EV platform big enough (yet). The Honda e was primarily produced for Europe and Japan. But of course, your superficial conclusion is that Honda sin't "good enough". Haha. 0/10.

By the way, GM had an existing partenship with LG. The EVs using these cells are not Hondas, they are re-badged GM EVs.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hm. The "plan" is 1m cars by 2025 over 30 models... so an average of 33,000 per model? Range of "as much as" 450 miles - Tesla does 353 miles today... Xpeng, Li and NIO will also probably be in the US by 2022 with sub-$20K cars... The numbers here are not good for GM.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Paul raises a good point: recharging infrastructure will be critical.

Say I’m traveling from KC to Colorado Springs (as we did when the kids were younger); That’s about a 600 mile drive. I’ll need to recharge somewhere. I’ll need a place where I don’t need to wait and where I can grab a sandwich and a diet Dr. Pepper.

The market won’t support this infrastructure right now, but this is an area where the government could nudge the market until demand is self-sustainable.

Personally, If I could get an electric vehicle (with the head-snapping torque) with 300+ mile range that could be charged (hopefully with electricity generated from solar or wind) in 30 min or less, That would do it for me.

In the short-term, the Biden administration could get the market to sustainable demand by helping to create the charging infrastructure necessary.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think the charging issue for longer journeys comes down to "national infrastructure", meaning that if the government is committed, it will ensure adequate coverage. I believe Germany has put in place a policy to have 1 million charging stations by 2030. Sure, it's tax money, but the benefits to society obviously outweigh the investment. By 2030, oil will be used where necessary, but necessary won't be cars. Of course, the macro-issue is how the electricity is generated.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Now if GM can only find some QC people and a could of designers they might be able to do something with the battery tech.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Couple* of designers.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Time for the US to catch up.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

An anecdote about manufacturers meeting the US Environmental Protection Agency's rules for vehicles......I met a man who worked as an engineer for GM in the vehicle emission laboratory in Van Nuys, California. That was a long time ago, it may be gone now. Certainly he is retired. Anyway, he told me that the Big Three (GM, Ford, and Chrysler) had jointly told the US government that they could not meet the EPA's rules, and that they absolutely needed more time to work on meeting the clean air and fuel efficiency standards that had been laid out for them to meet. Low and behold, the Swedes came along told the EPA that they would be able to meet the new standards, no problem. The Swedes joined a catalytic converter with computer controlled fuel injection, and met both the American clean air standards and the fuel efficiency standards.

That is what we call a "sea story". The original patent for a catalytic converter was United States Patent 2742437 awarded on 17 April 1956 to a French born but US resident mechanical engineer named Eugene Houdry. After later refinements the first production catalytic converter was produced by the Engelhard Corporation, a New Jersey based Fortune 500 company later purchased in 2006 by BASF.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Time for the US to catch up.

The last time I checked the industry leaders were Tesla and GM, both of which are US firms.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Swedes joined a catalytic converter with computer controlled fuel injection, and met both the American clean air standards and the fuel efficiency standards. T

Except the Swedish cars from Volvo and Saab in the early 1970s (along with Audis, VWs, Mercedes and some Porsches) used Bosch fuel injection from Germany and it was not electronic. Saab and Volvo used K-Jetronic, also called Continuous Injection System or CIS. It was a purely mechanical system that relied on airflow through a throttle body to lift pistons in a valve body exposing a metered slit. Fuel flowed continuously to an atomizer in the intake port above the valve. They would not adopt electronic injectors until the early 1990s when K-Jetronic could not longer meet increasingly stringent clean air standards.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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