Take our user survey and make your voice heard.
tech

Japan bans Galaxy Note 7 smartphones on aircraft over fire risk

14 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2016 AFP

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

14 Comments
Login to comment

So is like the rest of the world only starting to ban this device?!?! Why so delayed?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Japan doing it as an afterthought is understandable, being that the Note 7 was not sold in Japan.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Could be a good excuse to censor people from moving from country to country with hard drives and camera, internet. Good on Samsung though, it is a tough but responsible decision to withdraw such a popular product.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I liked the Galaxy Note bran, Had the first one that was reallly SLOW. but since most of them died in a year or less I switched brands and I have to say it. Samsung is not the big deal.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Was bound to happen in the 51st state sooner or later.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Interesting that Japanese news reporting without fail refers to "the Korean company, Samsung".

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Mike L. Oh so you saying the Puerto Rico also banned the phone???, or you being sarcastic, and you are referring to Canada, Cuba, Haiti, Mexico, Australia, Japan, Israel, Taiwan, New Zeland, Denmark, Poland, or the UK???

@Mizuame it is a very common thing in Japanese news, when referring to companies overseas. Entirely another matter is that you "interestingnly" just notice this when is regarding Samsung.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Interesting that Japanese news reporting without fail refers to "the Korean company, Samsung".

I was listening to a podcast the other day where Samsung was referred to as a Japanese company.

So it would make sense the Japanese want to distance themselves from Samsung - they don't want to be known as the country from which flaming phones come.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Good on Samsung though, it is a tough but responsible decision to withdraw such a popular product.

It would have been better for Samsung if they had made the product well enough that it didn't need to be withdrawn. I almost bought one of these phones while I was in America last week just for the fun of it, and to see if it would blow up. But the store said that they were no longer allowed to sell them, and that they hadn't had a chance to take down the display models yet.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

My original Note still works fine though I've had to replace the original battery with a third party as it couldn't hold a charge anymore after 5 years of use. A nice backup phone if anything ever happened to my current Sony Xperia.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Most unfortunate for Samsung.

Being banned from carriage makes enacting a recall somewhat challenging.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Was bound to happen in the 51st state sooner or later"

Foreign airlines and government agencies generally follow the lead of the US Federal Aviation Administration. After the FAA banned the phones, other countries around the world did so also.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

They are not really banned in the US. There is no mechanism to stop people from carrying them on board other than an announcement that they are banned. I'm in the US now and have been on several flights since the ban and seen this first hand.

People are NOT going to voluntarily hand their phones over at the counter.

The fire hazard is no joking matter on an aircraft. They should make everyone take their phones out of their bags, ESPECIALLY their checked luggage, and all phones found in carry on and checked luggage should be checked and confiscated.

There is no way to control a fire in the hold of an aircraft. Hundreds of people have died in crashes from fires in the hold of aircraft.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

mirroring moves by U.S. pretty much Japanese SOP on a myriad of things, hardly ever the reverse.

Almost every report across the globe always mentions that Takata is a Japanese company. Apple is usually referred to as the Californian or American company. Nothing sinister in calling Samsung Korean. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/28/business/international/japan-takata-airbag-recall.html?_r=0

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites