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Japan to raise hydrogen supply sixfold by 2040 to promote renewables

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Japan was also busted for buying oil from Russia,in violation in Sanction Good Japan Russian Oil

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

Japan to raise hydrogen supply sixfold by 2040 to promote renewables

While Japan still making money from Coal

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/12/10/national/japan-to-push-coal-in-developing-world/

https://www.vox.com/2020/2/18/21128205/climate-change-japan-coal-energy-emissions-pikachu

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

@sakurasaki

Your articles are dated and you should know Japanese companies have been reducing their assets in coal since.

some are already investing heavily into hydrogen

6 ( +8 / -2 )

The US and Japan are the future and the future will be patented by innovation in Japan and the US and brought to market by corporate Japan and entrepreneurs in the US. The EU, where serious policies are decided by high school students, is throwing in the towel, deindustializing and will be left far behind.

Will China compete, try to steal intellectual property or be the working class of the world?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

“Hydrogen does not emit carbon dioxide when combusted”

True. But you need electricity to isolate hydrogen from water and where does that electricity come from? Burning fossil fuels, of course. If you really want to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions, stop breathing.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

The government plans to issue the GX bonds worth about 20 trillion yen... 

I wonder what investors will think of this new kind of Japanese debt, the brainchild of "new capitalist" Kishida.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

True. But you need electricity to isolate hydrogen from water and where does that electricity come from? Burning fossil fuels, of course. If you really want to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions, stop breathing.

The maritime industry and some Scandinavian nations are leading the way towards producing hydrogen using only renewable energy sources, wind, solar and hydroelectric power. The International Maritime Organization along with engine manufacturers like Wartsila and MAN are driving the effort to develop carbon free propulsion for large ships, and the effort is leaning towards using "green hydrogen" or hydrogen produced using only renewable energy. Pilot plants are being built now, scaled so they can produce enough product while energy is available, knowing there may be periods where production has to cease for lack of energy.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The US and Japan are the future and the future will be patented by innovation in Japan and the US and brought to market by corporate Japan and entrepreneurs in the US. The EU, where serious policies are decided by high school students, is throwing in the towel, deindustializing and will be left far behind.

When comes to green energy nothing could be further from the truth, especially when it comes to green hydrogen and green ammonia, the latter could become a useful fuel alongside or even mixed with green hydrogen.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

When comes to green energy nothing could be further from the truth, especially when it comes to green hydrogen and green ammonia, the latter could become a useful fuel alongside or even mixed with green hydrogen.

I read last month about ammonia and how it supposedly is a much better option than hydrogen, unfortunately the text was directed to chemists so I got lost in the middle.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Very simple, it’s just replacing one ‘bad’ technology with another also ‘bad’ technology. Just stop that stupid lying into own pockets. Of course we need to breath and we need to eat and to move from place A to place B, and that’s not only us but also the things and goods and food and the heavy vehicles they are all in, that have to be transported and on average always need that certain amount of physical energy when moved from starting point to destination. And that’s btw needed not only in some H2 pilot projects in Scandinavia or ammonia tech, partially replacing CO2 problems with then NOx problems, no , it’s needed for all of the 8, 9 or 10 bln people on this planet. There is and also won’t be anything green at all when summed up and all factors considered.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I get the feeling Toyota had a big influence here. They don't want EVs because they build engines and want to keep it that way.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Hydrogen doesn't produce CO2 when combusted, but where does hydrogen come from? It doesn't occur naturally, so it has to be produced somehow - much of it (96%) comes from processing of oil or gas, itself energy intensive and producing methane which is a worse greenhouse gas than CO2. You can make hydrogen through electrolysis of water, but then you are using more electricity to generate the hydrogen than you will get back from burning it. Green hydrogen can be made by using electricity produced by renewable sources to make the hydrogen from water, but then you may as well have just put that electricity into the grid and burned less coal instead. Hydrogen is dangerous as hell - a highly explosive gas, invisible with no odour - you should see the safety precautions required for handling the stuff. Producing it, storing it and transporting it are all going to use more energy than it produces. For some reason, the Japanese have gone big into the hydrogen thing, from fuel cells (where methanol could be used instead) to using it directly as a fuel. The fact is, they just put most of their eggs into the wrong basket.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Green hydrogen can be made by using electricity produced by renewable sources to make the hydrogen from water, but then you may as well have just put that electricity into the grid and burned less coal instead.

But the supply of electricity from renewable sources such as wind and sun is variable. Sometimes there is not enough, and sometimes there is too much. I think the idea is to use the electricity produced at times of excess supply to create hydrogen. The idea makes sense, I think.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Some informative posts among the above. Thanks for the input folks!

Personally I find the idea of a future with green hydrogen replacing gasoline/petrol quite interesting. The technology has improved by leaps and bounds.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Japanese government sure loves its hydrogen, doesn't it? There must be some strategic value here that's not readily apparent, because I'm not sure why they are so interested in it compared to other green technologies. Their obsession has already hurt Toyota, setting them back years behind the competition in the EV race. Hopefully other promising avenues won't be cut off either.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I hope the stock goes up on a hydrogen valve company that I got a little burned on

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It’s hard to use hydrogen as an “alternative to fossil fuels” nearly all of it today is produced by burning fossil fuels. Then there are the storage and containment issues, your typical hydrogen-powered vehicle requires a tank several times larger than one which is gas-powered. But, 15 trillion yen buys a lot of favors, and all the better that it’s other people’s money. The family members of politicians will all find high-paying jobs in the hydrogen energy industry.

When you consider the fundamentals of “green energy” like electric cars, you have to consider the extra energy required to produce them. An electric car must be driven nearly 100,000 km before its emissions fall below those of fossil fuel cars, and that doesn’t take into account the emissions released when recycling the batteries (which is significant). In a country like Japan where vehicles are more lightly driven, electric cars are less “green” than fossil fuel powered cars

0 ( +0 / -0 )

GOOD

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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