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JAXA aims to launch new flagship H3 rocket in FY2022 after delays

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The rocket is being developed so that Japan can maintain its autonomous access to space in terms of launching satellites and probes, according to JAXA.

IMHO, they need to add to above "tender for defense contracts", that's where the big bux will be. Jaxa's $1.5 billion budget is tiny for what it does.

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The agency had delayed the launch after a test conducted on the H3 rocket's main engine found holes on the wall of a combustion chamber as well as a defect in a turbine that feeds fuel to the chamber.

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How did the parts pass inspection durring assembly ?

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How did the parts pass inspection durring assembly ?

using a brown envelope

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When compared to NASA, JAXA (*Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has been incredibly successful and has done impressive things in a much shorter period of time; plus Japan has been NASA ‘s best international partner over the last 40-plus years;*

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;even though it is (still) ranked in 6th (behind NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), RFSA (Russian Federation Space Agency), ESA (European Space Agency), ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization) and CNSA (China National Space Administration) ), JAXA has a spaceflight pedigree superior to that of most other American allies, and is more than capable of building and deploying the types of spaceflight technologies that could push a lunar exploration program forward.

The H3 rocket, which has been under development by JAXA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd, is set to succeed the current H2A launch vehicle.

The rocket is being developed so that Japan can maintain its autonomous access to space in terms of launching satellites and probes, according to JAXA.

before this, Japan found a reliable launch vehicle in the H-IIA rocket and JAXA has found success in a number of high-profile science missions, like HALCA (the first space-based mission for very long baseline interferometry, in which multiple telescopes are used simultaneously to study astronomical objects), Hayabusa (the first asteroid sample return mission), the lunar probe SELENE, IKAROS (the first successful demonstration of solar sail technology in interplanetary space), and Hayabusa2 (with samples from the asteroid Ryugu) – some of Japan’s/JAXA ‘s major achievementsan impressive list; there’s only one thing left to say: keep up the good work(!)

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How did the parts pass inspection durring assembly?

The components probably looked fine before the test. This was a post test inspection that revealed problems in these components after the rocket was fired for a period of time. This is why engineers conduct tests. Better to find these problems in a test environment than during a launch.

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