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Microsoft releases IE 10 browser for Windows 7

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42 Comments
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No thanks, I'll stick with Google chrome. (fast loading, simple and neat, sandboxed and best of all no major bugs)

7 ( +10 / -3 )

@titanium

Me too. Chrome is the best out there. I hate Firefox and IE. I haven't used IE in YEARS.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

I'm assuming the comments from most will be from people who haven't tried it.

Prefer Rockmelt to be honest, although Internet Explorer has come quite a long way since IE7. Uses a single svchost.exe process (unlike Chrome), doesn't have the infamous memory black hole of Firefox (even in its latest incarnation 6 or 7 tabs can total over 600MB memory use with minimal add-ons), and is rock solid on everything I've played around with it on so far.

Won't be switching from Rockmelt, but for sites that it doesn't play nicely with, IE is always the main backup.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Most people should wait for the full release, there could still be a few bugs to iron out. I don't use IE much but its there when I need to. IE 9 was better than any before.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This week, Steven Sinofsky President of the Windows Division was give the Microsoft "instant boot up" and fired on the spot or effective immediately. Shock prices fell 3% on the news. He was the main man behind the new Windows 8. He takes with him everything he knows about Windows. Worked for them for 23 years. Hope at least they gave him the "golden instant boot up".

Guess the sale of the new tablet didn't go as well as they expected?

Scott Forstall who was fired by Apple will be free next year to work for Microsoft.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Uses a single svchost.exe process (unlike Chrome)

Ever heard of "sandboxing" ? If one of my tabs in my IE9 crashes so does the entire browser. Separate processes and memory handling is not bad, actually it is an advantage especially in security.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Ever heard of "sandboxing" ? If one of my tabs in my IE9 crashes so does the entire browser. Separate processes and memory handling is not bad, actually it is an advantage especially in security.

Nonsense. Every software engineer knows that spawning processes is a bad design, from performance or security perspective. Yet Google follows that way to prevent Chrome from crash. Expect them to change that design in near future.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Yes, but I've never had IE9, 10 or even 8 crash on me on Windows 7 x64 and the beta & release versions of Windows 8. Chrome, Chromium and Rockmelt, yes I've had crashes on certain websites. And when they've crashed they've crashed the whole browser.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ever heard of "sandboxing"

sorry if I'm being rude, but you don't even understand the meaning behind sandboxing. In web browser, sandboxing is meant to prevent malicious javascript from attacking the system through browser. In Operating system, sandboxing is meant to prevent harmful software from attacking the system, by running that software in a virtual/quarantined environment.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Every software engineer knows

Then tell that to Google's Software Engineers. Google chrome with (multiple tabs opened)separated process handles mulithreading more efficient than any web browser.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Then tell that to Google's Software Engineers. Google chrome with (multiple tabs opened)separated process handles mulithreading more efficient than any web browser.

As if they don't know!? They chose a quick-n-dirty method that works, doesn't mean it's a good method. And I guess you don't even know the difference between process and thread.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Chrome frequently crashes on my Windows 7, OS X and iOS 6 but its not a problem since when you reopen the app you can restore it.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Yawn! I operate Firefox and do not use windows or explorer.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Firefox has become too bloated and too slow. I have not only stopped using it but deleted it too.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I'm sure that this will benefit the Japanese/Korean populations who for the most part seem to be oblivious of the existence of other browsers asides from IE more than it will for those overseas who normally use it as a last resort. I can't believe how many Japanese/Korean sites I encounter that do not work for any browser other than IE, and in those situations I am glad that they are releasing a new version. However I will only use it as a last resort.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In web browser, sandboxing is meant to prevent malicious javascript from attacking the system through..

Have you read the last sentence in my 2nd statement?

And I guess you don't even know the difference between process and thread.

Ahem. Been writing C/C++ and Java, I don't need someone to remind me since I encounter it once in a while.

IE9 lags behind with HTML5 handling too. Microsoft seems like struggling in catching up with its IE10.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

AmidalismNov. 15, 2012 - 11:36AM JST

I'm sure that this will benefit the Japanese/Korean populations who for the most part seem to be oblivious of the existence of other browsers asides from IE more than it will for those overseas who normally use it as a last resort.

Or the millions of computers administered by IT professionals who don't have time to certify ever changing browsers.

IE10 actually scores the fastest even in google's own tests (http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/robohornet-web-browser-performance,3303-3.html). Anyone who thinks it's slow or unstable clearly hasn't used it at all. Quite nice, but missing a few useful tools I normally use. IE10 on Win7 is a great step for the random IT guys who will stick to 7 for no reason other than fear.

titaniumdioxideNov. 15, 2012 - 11:39AM JST

IE9 lags behind with HTML5 handling too. Microsoft seems like struggling in catching up with its IE10.

When IE9 came out there was no such thing as HTML5 benchmarks, let alone websites. A lot can happen in 3+ years, and Microsoft is simply updating their browser as they do.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

sorry if I'm being rude, but you don't even understand the meaning behind sandboxing..... In Operating system, sandboxing is meant.....

You're telling this to someone who uses Oracle's Virtual box ? really?

Chrome frequently crashes on my Windows 7, OS X and iOS 6 but its not a problem since when you reopen the app you can restore it.

You are referring to the "Continue where I left off" feature. Yes love this feature too.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

IE now is actually way better than previous versions, but there's no reason to leave Chrome after years of great performance.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Have you read the last sentence in my 2nd statement?

Yes, it's clear as day. You stated that:

Separate processes and memory handling is not bad, actually it is an advantage especially in security.

No, from software design's perspective. It's too lengthy to explain here, so I guess I will leave it for now.

You're telling this to someone who uses Oracle's Virtual box ? really?

Seriously, I don't understand what you were saying. And yes, sandboxing is actually running the context of that process in a virtual environment, just not full blown like VirtualBox. if it's what you meant.

Don't understand what's good with Chrome? The fact that Google collects my browsing habit made me want to vomit. Firefox is bloated only if you installed a lot of plugins, so choose what to use at your discretion.

Last but not least, if you are developer, Firefox is your best friend. Most standardized browser, period.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

As much as I hate to say this, IE10 seems to be a good improvement over earlier versions. Still scores pretty far behind Chrome in html5 tests.

Still not gonna use it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

SquidBertNov. 15, 2012 - 02:07PM JST

As much as I hate to say this, IE10 seems to be a good improvement over earlier versions. Still scores pretty far behind Chrome in html5 tests.

What tests? Right now there's "compliance" lists, but the standard hasn't been finalized yet anyway. When it comes to practical applications of HTML5, IE10 and Firefox are both faster than chrome thanks to better hardware optimizations.

titaniumdioxideNov. 15, 2012 - 12:24PM JST

You are referring to the "Continue where I left off" feature. Yes love this feature too.

That's like saying a steering wheel is a nice feature to have in a car. IE10, Firefox, and a dozen other browsers have the same thing. Most people never use it because the programs never crash though...

And you and blackrock need to stop bickering. Browsers have a different (broken) concept of what sandboxing is. It's not true sandboxing as simply a limitation on the API calls to prevent one process from causing issue with another. It lets you crash one process without terminating the program itself, a feature both Firefox and IE9+ have with flash (the only source of crashes, at least the only one that isn't in the control of the browser developer). Hardly secure though, so if you plan on security it is best to use something like XP Mode from W7 (Hyper-V in W8) that provides true sandboxing.

Chrome's kind of the bastard child of great ideas and half-assed coding. IE10 is far more robust and will likely make IT guys very happy to finally upgrade from IE6 on XP (to IE10 on Win7)

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@Basroil

What tests?

html5test.com for example http://html5test.com/results/desktop.html.

Maxthon 3.4.5: 457 15 Chrome 23: 448 13 Opera 12.00: 389 9 Safari 6.0: 378 8 Firefox 16: 372 10 Internet Explorer 10: 320 6
1 ( +2 / -1 )

SquidBertNov. 15, 2012 - 05:39PM JST

That was a rhetorical question. I already shot down your response before you even posted it. Those are NOT performance tests, those are "compliance" with 500 randomly chosen points that have nothing to do with web browsing performance even on HTML5 pages. Hell, chrome doesn't even fully support CSS3, so why bother with something still not even finalized like HTML5?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Compliance test, is still test

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Also,

I don't do well with rhetorical questions.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What good is a compliance test, when people will just write their pages for IE anyways.

Also, IE launches seperate processes for each tab, so that 1 tab won't crash the others. Although, 1 tab crashing still temporarily locks up the IE browser until that tab finally closes. It's called iexplore.exe, not svchost. svchost is well...just that. A host to run a Windows service .dll.

Anyways, I've been using IE since well...I started using computers. During Win 98 to now. Tried FF, Chrome, Opera, etc. Does the same crap, while still requiring me to have IE for other crap anyways, so I don't bother with them anymore. I don't gain any real noticeable performance difference, nor functionality difference. Not without install stupid add-ons.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Wake up and go Apple already.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

For normal web surfing I use Firefox, I tended to use Chrome a lot but one day my Windows 7 send me BSOD after a Chrome browser was opened, I decided to take my chances to Firefox and is working well, except if you want to use the flash games like Zynga or other facebook companies. I use still IE8 at work because of testing activities (is more easy to detect defects in IE than in Chrome) but I use Firefox for debugging when a defect is found...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Call me crazy, but I'll pay attention to an HTML5 "test" when HTML5 has been actually specified. Until then any "test" is dubious at best.

I use Chrome at home, but only because one website I use has been specifically coded to break when you visit with an IE browser. (And no, it's not IE's fault. The site stops loading, then puts up a page chastizing you for using IE so the failure is intentional.) At work we use IE and anybody who loads one of the other browsers is on their own if they have connection problems. We (the IT department) support one browser and while we don't prohibit others, we don't assist with getting them working.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Curiously it's the Japan Today home page that sometimes stops IE9 on my Win7 PC. No other websites, just this one.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wake up and go Apple already.

Wow. Fanboi much?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

JonathanJoNov. 16, 2012 - 04:25AM JST

Curiously it's the Japan Today home page that sometimes stops IE9 on my Win7 PC. No other websites, just this one.

Probably just some flash element on it actually. They have some fishy advertisements, some of which seem like they weren't properly configured.

FadamorNov. 16, 2012 - 04:08AM JST

Call me crazy, but I'll pay attention to an HTML5 "test" when HTML5 has been actually specified. Until then any "test" is dubious at best.

Not crazy at all, simply rational, unbiased thought. The "core" specification (one that probably won't change and probably will be included) is supported on all major browsers, so it's just those speed centric secondary attributes that are somewhat less on IE10 than opera or firefox.

SquidBertNov. 15, 2012 - 06:01PM JST

Compliance test, is still test

And a tomato is just a fruit. Compliance tests FOR INCOMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS is one of the most pointless things around. And even so, most of the specification is entirely useless for 99.999% of the population. How many h264 (part of the specification actually) decoders and encoders do you think support the entire specification (which is not incomplete). That answer is exactly zero. x264 and ffmpeg come close, but even they miss out certain parts. But that hasn't stopped h264 from become THE video format, and most devices can't even decode more than half the specificaitons, and even then only in certain combinations.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@JonathanJo

I don't think JapanToday is coded towards web standards, but more towards the old IEs that barely followed web standards. IE9 and higher probably follow W3C standards more than the other browsers now, which means old sites designed around older versions of IE doesn't work so well.

I simply set IE9 to use compatibility mode for JapanToday and have no issues.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Thanks Korlacan, I'll set it to compatibility mode too.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If you don't care about privacy then go ahead and use Google chrome.....

0 ( +2 / -2 )

IE? boy that shipped sailed a long long time ago. Even if it has caught up with the others they still offer more features that I like and use. Opera has been my mainstay for over 10 years. The first browser with tabbed browsing. Fast and secure and I have it fully customized now to my preferences. It's hard to leave it now, I know it so well and it works so well. It may seem confusing at first but once you get into it, you see why it's so good.

Chrome is my other browser - the sync between my nexus phone, work and home is great and the extensions.

firefox, have never been a fan.simply because for so long Opera was superior to it and never saw the point.

I had the misfortune of using safari a few times..

too little too late Microsoft. IE sucked for so long, that experienced users moved to FF, Chrome and Opera and they wont go back. Same with Windows phone 8. Simply too late to the party.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Been told by the IT at work Chrome is a security risk and they went around removing it from all work computers if installed.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Friends don't let friends use Internet Explorer....

Also I switched to Waterfox (a faster version of Firefox) and Comodo Chrome. However Comodo Chrome (a Comodo Firewall/AV addon to Chrome) lately has been posting ads so I'm back to Waterfox. Adblock doesn't help here.

Waterfox loads faster than Firefox otherwise it's the same thing. Use Adblock and Flashblock and you should be golden.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Addons: Xmarks, Flashblock, Adblock, DownloadHelper. Done.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Addons: Xmarks, Flashblock, Adblock, DownloadHelper. Done.

Not really :-P

These are just a few of my FF addons: Adblock Plus, Element hiding helper, Secure Sanitizer, Askforsanitize, Betterprivacy (deletes LSO cookies), Blocksite, Cookieculler, Flagfox, For Human Eyes Only, Ghostery (blocks trackers), HTTPS-Everywhere, MAFIAAFire: Redirector, MAFIAAFire: ThePirateBay Dancing! (just an addon that sends sites of your choosing through a random proxy), RequestPolicy (control cross site requests)

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

All those add-ons that don't do anything useful.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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