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Mozilla resists request to remove Firefox tool

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truth goddog, i just try to update ff on my old mac and it said that. you can pay for osx version update to anything above v10.4 and it should work.

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Is that true BlackOut? I have a whole bunch of Macs with my business here. I will look into that.

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One of my old iMacs will not allow firefox to work or update.

newer FF and Chrome can not run on OSX "under" v.10.4.11. i am not even sure if newer safari will do it.

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One of my old iMacs will not allow firefox to work or update. Tried to get an older version and none available. Kind of weird. So using Opera and Safari.

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Is there another J.Edgar Hoover in the Homeland department, gonna clean up our morality and become "The Chief". You go Boy!

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and how does the immigration department have jurisdiction in communications?, much less, refuse to "comment publicly" on their mandates. Hiding something yourselves, obviously. Copyrights do not mean that absolutely nothing may be copied, does it? That would mean that you own nothing that you buy, and what kind of a world is that. The entertainment industry needs to chill out a little or they'll end up without patrons. Weird Al tells you don't download, and he means it.

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Fadamor is a totalitarian government's favorite kind of citizen. He thinks we should give up fundamental property rights and freedom of expression without question because if we don't, the government will have no qualms about taking these rights away anyhow. Forget whether the government action is legal, forget that file sharing is not only for pirates (no wink and nod here--it really is, and if you don't know that, then you are ignorant and badly deceived).

Scrote is right on. This is the kind of situation in which people need to take a stand and push back to make sure the government follows the law. That is NOT TOO MUCH TO ASK, wouldn't you say?

The US government action was outrageous. In shutting down a "suspect" domain, it accidentally also shut down 84,000 subdomain pages. The pages were all redirected to a banner that stated "Advertisement, distribution, transportation, receipt, and possession of child p0rn0gr&phy constitute federal crimes that carry penalties for first time offenders of up to 30 years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, forfeiture and restitution."

This meant that owners of and visitors to 84,000 legitimate websites saw a banner page alleging that their site was involved in illegal child-related activity.

There was no judicial process, no judicial review and no remedial action taken afterward.

Now you tell me Fadamor, why we should bend over backward to enable this outrageous and unchecked abuse of our property and expression rights? And why my tax dollars finance government actions on undertaken for the benefit of private companies and none of these can be held responsible for this severe abuse of power?

Come off it mate. Go live in North Korea if that is your paradigm.

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Mozilla is simply asking for a court order and for the government to actually state that the tool is illegal. No company should take orders from the government against legal activity. It's quite a simple request.

It's no different than the cops asking your ISP for your home address without a warrant. It would be a crime for your ISP to comply. This is why they make a polite request for a warrant and statement that something is in fact illegal. Common sense.

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I'm behind Mozilla all the way on this.

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First of all, it is the US government that is acting illegally by taking over domains that US film and music companies claim are infringing their copyrights. Domains are seized without any evidence being presented, or legal case filed with the courts. This is IP theft by the US government.

If there really is infringement it is the film and music companies that should be filing court cases, not the US government. Why is the US government doing the bidding of private companies?

Secondly, many of the domains seized did not host copyright content and were merely search engines, no different from Google. Again, there was no legal process: the US government simply stole the IP.

I suppose the next move will be the seizure of the mozilla domain, the site that distributes the firefox browser, on the pretext that they are enabling "theft" of copyright material.

It's time to make a stand against overbearing governments that seek to limit our freedom. MafiaaFire is one way to do that.

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The governments will then have no qualms about taking over the IP address registries and locking-out ISPs hosting pirate sites.

No this is the government, no s. US only. The US is trying to regulate the GLOBAL internet by overreaching and taking down international business they have no legitimate control over.

Mozilla, you had the rare chance to prove that the government didn't need to be interfering in the operation of the internet, and instead you committed an EPIC FAIL.

Absolutely not. One of the site ordered to be taken down was certified by courts in Spain to be legal, yet the US ordered its takedown anyway. The US government is already interfering in the operation of the internet, and more companies and governments need to put down their feet and say NO, the US does not run the internet.

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Odd that Mozilla would take such a strong stand publicly supporting internet piracy facilitators. That's tantamount to painting a big red bulls-eye on your company for further investigation.

In the end it will prove futile as the government will point to Mozilla's lack of cooperation as proof that the industry is incapable of self-regulating illegal activity. The governments will then have no qualms about taking over the IP address registries and locking-out ISPs hosting pirate sites.

Mozilla, you had the rare chance to prove that the government didn't need to be interfering in the operation of the internet, and instead you committed an EPIC FAIL. Apparently you never learned that sometimes you have to lose a battle to win the war.

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Go Mozilla go! Firefox rules!

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