tech

New app tells you nearest subway exit to your destination

10 Comments

Tokyo Metro Co has begun testing a new application for smartphones which lets users know the nearest station exit to a destination they are heading to.

The new app uses radio-frequency transmission so that it can be used in locations such as subway stations that do not receive GPS.

Currently, test operations are being implemented only at Omotesando and Nihonbashi subway stations until mid-March next year.

Tokyo Metro will expand the app to include more stations when it officially launches the service.

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10 Comments
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I admire them for trying, but let's get real. No one is going to use a dedicated app for finding station exits. "Siloed" apps never work - it has to be an integrated feature of something larger like Google Maps. The likes of Navitime should also take notice.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

I admire them for trying, but let's get real. No one is going to use a dedicated app for finding station exits. "Siloed" apps never work - it has to be an integrated feature of something larger like Google Maps. The likes of Navitime should also take notice.

Perhaps they might get bought by google. But yeah I agree, this is a feature googlemaps need, it still doesn't display all exit numbers and it would make navigating a lot easier

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"a new application... lets users know the nearest station exit to a destination"

This is well overdue. If you get out at the wrong exit in Tokyo it feels like you're in another part of town... :-(

2 ( +3 / -1 )

sighclopsDEC. 14, 2015 - 08:55AM JST I admire them for trying, but let's get real. No one is going to use a dedicated app for finding station exits.

Agreed. This function fits a real need, but as papigiulio says, their only hope is getting bought by Google.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Interoperability robs engineers of self-importance, and "busy inefficient" of their complexity fix.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I guess the signs plastered up all over the place don't seem to be working. Much better to have everyone stare down at their phones as they walk? Maybe redesign the signs for more readability?

How about a nifty audio alert? Like Car-Navi but for your phone. Then you can read the signs, look where you're going, and find your exit all at the same time.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Next maybe an an app to tell us where to stand on the train so we're closest the the right exit when we arrive?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Does it tell you how navigate using elevators or lifts? Tokyo has the worst system in the first world.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

At its core, this is a product designed by a bunch of engineers trying hard to do something that will help other people, backed by a company that doesn't necessarily have a market need to do so. Dogooders doing good makes me smile. Even if there's room for improvement, you have to start somewhere!

I wouldn't be surprised if this ends up being the first step toward a comprehensive navigation app built in time for the Olympics -- or, as others have said, purchased by Google.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think the app will help the travelers as well as tourists who are unable to read and understand the common language. The app is going to recognize the location where the person needs to get down and will prevent people from getting lost.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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