Photo: Nikkei x Tech
tech

New tech enables thin needle to be inserted into cancer tumor with high accuracy

10 Comments

Rock & Lotus, a medical venture spun off from Waseda University, says it has developed a technology to insert a thin needle into a cancer tumor with a high accuracy.

The technology enables a doctor to inject medicine into a tumor while reducing the burden on the patient. The company said it will check the safety of the technology in an animal study, aiming to conduct a clinical test in 2022.

The thin needle is inserted straight into a tumor at a depth of 10-15cm with a margin of error of less than 1mm. By slightly vibrating a needle while rotating it, it becomes possible to reduce friction with flesh and, therefore, insert a needle in a straight line.

Currently, a doctor inserts a needle, relying on the sensation of fingertips, while preventing the needle from being bent. Depending on the expertise of a doctor, it becomes necessary to insert a needle several times.

The horizontal rotation of a needle is realized by a stepping motor, and the rotation speed is several hertz. For the vertical vibration, whose speed seems to be several tens of hertz, a piezoelectric actuator is used.

© Nikkei x Tech

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Get it’s early enough and we’re in business.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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That's a breakthrough. Really - for those who have a biopsy - reduces the pain.

Japanese have come up with various innovations around needles that facilitate medical intervention.

i think it is standard practice in Japan to use plastic needles for blood tests or blood transfusions, for example.

Whereas in most other countries that I know if steel needles are still used.

There is even a biodegradable needle available in Japan for diabetics who are required to test their blood daily.

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3 ( +3 / -0 )

I had a biopsy yesterday. Very uncomfortable. There wasn't any pain because they numbed my nervous system from the naval down. But I couldn't move for 9 hours while the effects wore off.

I will have keyhole surgery in the coming months.

This method looks good.

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@zichi

Wishing you the best - successful surgery and smooth recovery. !

It's amazing how medical technology has made so many interventions easier, more accurate (with the inclusion of tiny cameras) and recovery faster bc the traditionally invasive surgeries have been circumvented..

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yes medical science is moving in the right directions. Like the da Vinci surgery made by keyhole with a computer. Recently had several MRI which is a like Matt Daemon on a Journey to Mars. We are fortunate to have well equipped hospitals.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Zichi, fingers crossed your surgery is successful. Its catching these things early.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I look forward to the day that they can use non-invasive solutions for "surgery" (rather than Minimally Invasive). It may sound a bit like Star-trek-Sci-Fi, but it's simply a combination/extrapolation of current Physics research and Medical innovation.... something to watch for within the next decade or two.

Star Trek rocks by the way... without imagination, we'd never progress.

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@ zichi: We are fortunate to have well equipped hospitals.

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That is true, if you are speaking about Japanese Hospitals / Medical services.

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It's quite different in other, say G7 - category countries - possibly with the exception of Germany & Norway

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0 ( +0 / -0 )

I've had 2 MRI Scans in Japan darn expensive, but do produce neat pictures of your insides. Though I'd much rather have a 3D model of the imagery rather than the negatives... would be much more interesting.

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I've had 2 MRI Scans in Japan darn expensive, but do produce neat pictures of your insides. Though I'd much rather have a 3D model of the imagery rather than the negatives... would be much more interesting.

Recently I have been through the ringer. MRI, CT, Echo and prostrate biopsy. One day/night in a very good specialist clinic with a private room and great care.

Because I'm retired my maximum costs are ¥35,000 per month but actually my clinic bill was ¥28,000.

I dread to think how much it would cost in America. I will have a two week stay to remove my prostrate with keyhole surgery.

Then I will have another biopsy on my right kidney and then have that too removed.

The technique in the post would have helped me if was available.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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