tech

Panasonic develops world's highest efficiency white OLED for lighting

13 Comments

Panasonic Corp has developed a white Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) with the world's highest luminous efficiency of 114 lm/W (light-emitting area of 1 cm). In addition, a luminous efficiency of 110 lm/W has also been achieved with a device with a larger emitting area of 25 cm.

In order to achieve such a level of high efficiency with the OLED, the company focused on "light extraction technology" and the "all phosphorescent white OLED technology" (technology for the multilayering of the organic emitting layer).

OLEDs are capable of emitting any color including white when a voltage is applied by combining organic materials that emit various colors such as red, green, and blue. The soft surface luminescence makes OLEDs suitable for lighting a wide area, and along with the benefits of being not overly bright when viewed directly and a thin and lightweight structure, they are receiving attention as the next generation light source.

Lighting devices equipped with the high efficiency OLEDs are considered to achieve a luminous efficiency comparable to or higher than that of fluorescent lamps (approx. 60-80 lm/W) or LED lighting fixtures (approx. 80 lm/W) currently available in the market. Further, a wide variety of applications are expected for OLED devices, including use in general lighting. White OLED lighting will create new value in people's daily lives and has great potential for realizing a comfortable and ecological lifestyle.

© JCN Newswire

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

13 Comments
Login to comment

White OLED lighting will create new value in people’s daily lives and has great potential for realizing a comfortable and ecological lifestyle.

Looking forward to the new value and comfort then. And an ecological lifestyle to boot.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

with the world’s highest luminous efficiency of 114 lm/W (light-emitting area of 1 cm). In addition, a luminous efficiency of 110 lm/W has also been achieved with a device with a larger emitting area of 25 cm.

And we can make a typical light bulb available for your home or office for under ¥100,000 per bulb (plus tax)

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Congratulation to the guys and gals at Panasonic. Always setting and achieving higher goals. KM would have been very proud that you have continued in the great tradition he set forth. PHP

3 ( +4 / -1 )

A short time some Korean copycat company will release something similar for half the price .. Just wait and see.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

the problem remaining is not the light efficiency, which has been enough for some time, but the life time. (remember the Sony OLED TCV?) Especially for a lighting device this issue become crucial and it's the main factor in hampering commercial applications. but it will be solved in the near future

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@issa1 So what? If Korean companies have the capabilities to release their products at half price compared to Japanese products, then so be it. I would rather spend half amount of money to get the same product.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Panasonic Corp had better get this product registered everywhere as quickly ... otherwise, China & Korea will soon be marketing "their own" white Organic Light Emitting Diodes, then claim the copyright is theirs.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Panasonic seems obsessed with world's fastest, biggest, brightest... If the thing isn't price competitive, consumers won't want to know.

In this economic climate, superlative = superfluous.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Panasonic did NOT invent white OLED. They just "improved" its current white OLED.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I'll remind the commenters above that the first incandescent light bulb wasn't perfect. Ongoing incremental changes will make OLEDs the light source of choice sooner than you may expect.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Panasonic develops the most expensive light bulb in the world. Everything Panasonic makes is too expensive compared to other Japanese makers.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Customers don't care about $!%! quality when its price is x2 or even x3 than other SAME products.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

If the Japanese don't make innovative things, they will say the Japanese aren't innovative. But when they are innovating, these same people will say those things are useless. Haters will always be haters ;)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites