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Ransomware surge imperils hospitals as pandemic intensifies

7 Comments
By Rob Lever

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7 Comments
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What do they need unsecured Internet for, instead of only Intranet and one secured port Internet connection to outside, for instance to other hospitals or health insurances by only one safe data pool? If you can’t handle it, avoid it and use pen and paper. lol

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What do they need unsecured Internet for, instead of only Intranet and one secured port Internet connection to outside, for instance to other hospitals or health insurances by only one safe data pool? If you can’t handle it, avoid it and use pen and paper. lol

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What do they need unsecured Internet for, instead of only Intranet and one secured port Internet connection to outside, for instance to other hospitals or health insurances by only one safe data pool? If you can’t handle it, avoid it and use pen and paper. lol

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What do they need unsecured Internet for, instead of only Intranet and one secured port Internet connection to outside, for instance to other hospitals or health insurances by only one safe data pool? If you can’t handle it, avoid it and use pen and paper.

Where to begin here. So you want a separate stovepiped air-gapped intranet from each hospital to each insurer and presumably to each doctor. How about patient access? Your method would mean each insurer would have many thousands of individual intranets to all the hospitals in the US, and tens of thousands more for each doctor in their network. Oh, now what happens when you need care out of network? Courier pigeon? Or build a new intranet to that out of network hospital or clinic? There are better ways to handle this problem and it usually begins with teaching staff how to recognize phishing and other standard security knowledge to thwart attempts to load malware. Almost all of these exploits rely on an employee being bamboozled by an illegitimate e-mail disguised to look legitimate.

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Anyone found guilty of distributing malware which indirectly causes death due to delayed treatment should be charged with murder/manslaughter when caught.

Everyone knows that hospitals are full of sick and injured, and that any action which hampers their operation will lead to further suffering and/or death.

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Anyone found guilty of distributing malware which indirectly causes death due to delayed treatment should be charged with murder/manslaughter when caught.

Agree in principal but consider a lot of the cyber criminals are far away in nations unfriendly to the nation in which the victim hospital lies. Tracking and arresting these criminals when the nation in which they live is hostile to your own is a major challenge.

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Since there seems there wasn't a cyberattack for this election like the one that put Traitor Trump into the WH in 2016, I guess cyberpunks are now hacking into hospitals right now due to the pandemic, just to be the pests that they are. And those kind, like the group Anonymous don't observe national boundaries.

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