world

Beijing loyalist John Lee elected as Hong Kong's next leader

45 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.


45 Comments
Login to comment

How can you have an "election" with one candidate? What a sham.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

A sham. When I was in HS, there was just one candidate for a school class position and I left it blank. The vote collector snipped at me about it and I said 'what's the point if she's the only option? She's gonna get it anyway'.

Just like now. And you better believe that John Lee is a CCP stooge.

'We and us. a new chapter together'. Uh-huh. NOT.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

hooktrunk2Today  12:48 pm JST

How can you have an "election" with one candidate? What a sham.

'SELECTION', not 'election.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Something that has gnawed at me the last three years is the Hong Kong Police. One would have expected that in a city with Hong Kong's history there would have been a large number of police as disgusted with the way the CCP came down on the city crushing everyone's freedoms as much of the rest of the people of Hong Kong were. But one would never know it from how they act. They are more like the Red Guards, true believers ready to crack heads. There was never an instance where the police sided with the protesters it seemed. They towed the party line at the expense of their people. The courts and the legal profession seemed to roll over pretty easily too. When it mattered most nobody had the courage to take a stand.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Congratu… er, … uh… “Good for You”(?). - Can’t think of anything appropriate here.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

China calls this democracy. Everyone else calls it a sham.

Hong Kong has no democracy left, decades ahead of schedule and in direct contravention of the international treaty China signed with the UK in good faith.

China's word means nothing and China's signature means even less.

China has proven over and over that it is not to be trusted.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Once again, Hong Kong got ‘poled’, all right. - The original headline here earlier read: “Hong Kong kicks off leadership polls with sole candidate”.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

John Lee was elected as Hong Kong's next leader Sunday, after winning over 99% of votes cast by a largely pro-Beijing election committee.

In Socialist elections, the government always seems to win.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

As the only candidate in the polls, Lee was expected to win

How is it possible to call this an election???? To have an ELECTION, there have to be more than ONE candidate!!! It's a sham, that's what it is!!!!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

What a slogan. We and Us - A new chapter together.

A new chapter written and approved by the CCCP for everyone in Hong Kong - like it or not.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

And sone people still have the nerve to criticize all that Great Britain did for HK. How have things been going since the handover to the CCP? Happy now?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

It isn't an election when 1,500 unelected representatives are deciding the vote.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Write in: "None of the Above"

4 ( +6 / -2 )

John?? LOL!

I know Hong Kongese love western first names and it certainly is fine if you embrace western values and approaches. But if you're a communist like this guy and 'Carrie' Lam, it's hypocritical and utterly laughable that you go by 'John'.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

The word of the Chinese government is worth less than a string of snot and will bind them about as strongly. They have comprehensively broken the treaty they signed.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

HK is over. Get out whilst you can. Even Brexit Britain is better for those with the relevant visas.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Was this story sourced from the Babylon Bee? Surely this situation could be nothing but satire.

Oh, wait...

3 ( +5 / -2 )

The best way to stop the red menace is to vote with your wallet.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Elected? I thought Hong Kong had 8M people. How does someone get under 2000 votes but still get 'elected'?

Ah ... that's the "Chinese" version of elections where the people don't have a say. Sorry. I should have realized.

My "None of the Above" is a movie reference - Richard Pryor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXEglx-or6k is a clip.

American people have the power to use psychological political coercion against American politican

You mean by actually voting and having multiple candidates, also selected by the people? American politics is far from perfect, but Chinese politics seems 500K lightyears from perfect.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Chinese are Chinese, all from China.

Sigh, completely ignoring the fact that there is a vast Chinese diaspora. Someone of Chinese ethnicity can be born and live almost anywhere in the world and many do. Many do not identify with China either. Surprised? They grew up somewhere else, maybe never set foot in China even once in their life and thus have no real affinity for it. Where they grew up is their home and the nation they love.

My step daughter left China at a young age and grew up in the west. She has visited family in Shanghai occasionally but hates China. People are rude and have bad personal habits. Beneath the shiny surface Shanghai is filthy and crowded. If you have lived somewhere nicer there is no appeal to living in China, even if you were born there.

An aside, another neighbor friend was second generation American born Japanese. Both parents were first generation American born Japanese from immigrant Japanese parents. Not an unusual situation in California. He took a vacation to Japan. When he came back he was a little bewildered because everywhere he went he was called "gaijin" and shunned. This was the mid 1980s. He told me many local restaurants refused to serve him because he was not to them Japanese, but American. So if not all Japanese are from Japan consider that maybe not all Chinese are from China.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

One other point. The Hong Kong region speaks Cantonese and has a different culture and arts than the rest of China. Even before Lam Cheng Yuet-ngo, aka "Carrie Lam" started to crack the whip and enforce Beijing's policies many in Hong Kong chafed under pressures from the mainland for Hong Kong to stop speaking Cantonese and speak Mandarin, and felt their arts were being suppressed by the Beijing government, both attempts to suppress their unique language and culture and homogenize them with the rest of China. That is part of the reason we all saw the posters saying "Hong Kong is not China". In many ways this is true. The people of Hong Kong are linguistically and culturally different people from the Mandarin speaking Han and that difference predates the arrival of the British.

Having a wife who speaks Shanghainese and Mandarin (two different languages) and Engrish with a Mandarin accent we often face difficulties obtaining service in restaurants of other business run by Cantonese speakers and sometimes even Taiwanese in the US. They pick up on my wife's accent and that's it, she represents their communist enemy, never mind Mao treated our family harshly and ran them out of Shanghai into extreme poverty during the Cultural Revolution. Her language represents their sworn enemy, and this was happening to us well before the 2019 protests, as far back as 2010/2011 time frame. We could go into a restaurant, sit there for a half hour and nobody would even offer us a menu. Just turn their backs and make a point of ignoring us.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Everybody that has half a brain cell abandoned HK when

Prince Charles floated out of the harbor.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

englisc aspyrgendMay 8  07:38 pm JST

The word of the Chinese government is worth less than a string of snot and will bind them about as strongly. They have comprehensively broken the treaty they signed.

And you think these stooges care?

theFuMay 8  01:19 pm JST

Write in: "None of the Above"

I barely remember when Iran had their 'elections' in 1979. Green tickets were in support of the new totalitarian ayatollah regime, red were against it. All the red tickets were instantly trash-canned and the green ('yes') tickets were tallied up. Guess who won?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I don’t have enough info to predict how this guy will be, but Hong Kong is a major business center and this guy is a former policeman with no business experience. Unless the goal is to collapse Hong Kong, he will need to have excellent advisors and learn very quickly. We’ll see how this is going to go soon enough.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The out come is determined when the rues are set.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Gee that’s a surprise! How do these people live with themselves!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Lee pledged to enact long-shelved local legislation to protect against security threats

From whom? Is there a rash of bank robberies?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"Elected" lol...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Desert TortoiseToday  04:01 am JST

Chinese are Chinese, all from China.

Sigh, completely ignoring the fact that there is a vast Chinese diaspora. Someone of Chinese ethnicity can be born and live almost anywhere in the world and many do. Many do not identify with China either. Surprised? They grew up somewhere else, maybe never set foot in China even once in their life and thus have no real affinity for it. Where they grew up is their home and the nation they love.

Everybody knows about the famous Chinatown in San Francisco. It's the largest such diaspora community in the world. When I was stationed in the area there were local TV ads promoting their pride featuring their children saying, 'I am proud to be a Chinese-American.' Right at the edge of that community is a huge stone Catholic cathedral (Masses are in the Chinese language, maybe their rite is too). That would be taboo in Red China, all religious services there are forced to be underground.

And when I visited Montreal for the first time, the hotel clerks told me of a parade in their ethnic Chinatown. I went and saw it and some of those people were conversing in French, BION. The number one language in PQ. Chinese-Canadians. And when I drove through Toronto in 2019, the area's horrid road construction diverted me to a Chinatown there. When I stayed at the Ottawa Ramada Inn, one of the clerks was an ethnic Chinese-Canadian. They speak English and French and want nothing to do with modern China, esp. because of the CCP. And just like in America, Canada has had people of this ethnicity for perhaps 180 years (?) and this is their home, beings they are 'North American' by several generations.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Surely “Wo he women” means “I and we”… or Me & Us.

Not Cantonese though.

And “Special Administrative Region” has a ‘special’ meaning especially nowadays.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Desert Tortoise, I appreciate your posts above, with your wife’s invaluable experience. Years ago I read The Joy Luck Club and it had me in tears. Thank you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

The CCP stooges, that is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A secret ballot with only one candidate ....hmm...i wonder who will win !

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

So the nominating committee vetted and approved only one candidate for the board.

Yep, sounds like the so-called shareholder democracy that people keep raving about in the corporate world.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

John Lee was elected as Hong Kong's next leader Sunday, after winning over 99% of votes cast by a largely pro-Beijing election committee.

Lee received 1,416 votes in the chief executive election, far exceeding the 751 votes he needed to win. The Election Committee's nearly 1,500 members cast their votes in a secret ballot Sunday morning.

As the only candidate in the polls, Lee was expected to win, especially since he had Beijing’s endorsement and last month obtained 786 nominations from members of the Election Committee in support of his candidacy.

Interesting, obviously Rudy Giuliani is now consulting for Beijing....guess he used his old 2020 fraudulent electors and fake certification lists....

Too bad there's no Mike Pence in HK....

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

GOOD !!..

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

A single extreme candidate, elected by a cabal of hand-picked extremist representatives, done in secret...

Yep, sounds like what the Repubs want in 2024...

-6 ( +9 / -15 )

How can you have an "election" with one candidate? What a sham.

Oh, I don't know. Kinda like how there's an election where you have two candidates who offer the same thing or where one offers nothing and the other offers more of nothing? USA, France, UK?

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

gbr48:

HK is over. Get out whilst you can. Even Brexit Britain is better for those with the relevant visas.

Those who wanted to have done so already (unless they've been jailed for violence and attempted murder). Some have already started causing trouble in UK while others are struggling to adapt to life in UK where jobs are hard to come by (except driving trucks) and avoiding anti-Chinese abuse is like walking through a minefield.

For others, HK is still home. Life goes on. Unlike UK, a lot of financial help has been given to residents, and infrastructure and development continues in parallel with those of the mainland. Another harbour rail tunnel opens next week. A stark contrast to London's Elizabeth Line which has been delayed and delayed. You'll be lucky to see a new road this year in UK or US.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Chinese are Chinese, all from China.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Congradulations John Lee, we need a real patriotic leader instead a troublemaker who sworn for loyalty but doing sneaky covert operation for hostile powers, that man is "Martin Lee", he is spending his time to blame himself in jail now. Blaming his own rebel behaviour!

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

When JT posters start complaining that HK is no more, you know that either they've never been there, or they're gweilos who are no longer treated like charisma men and are bitter that they are no longer at the top of the hierarchy. HK for HKers, not entitled gweilos on expat packages or local thugs who set people on fire or threw bricks at police or physically abused the elderly in the streets.

HK is a part of China, not some UK colony where locals are coolies without the right to vote. That's right - they NEVER had the right to vote for anything during all those years when HK was a colony. Deal with it.

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites