Armed police patrol the departure lobby at the airport in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Photo: REUTERS/Thomas Peter
world

China says protesters like 'terrorists' as Hong Kong airport reopens

67 Comments
By Felix Tam and Marius Zaharia

China's Hong Kong Liaison office said on Wednesday that anti government protesters were no different to "terrorists", as U.S. President Donald Trump said Chinese troops were moving to the border with Hong Kong and urged calm.

The Beijing-based Hong Kong and Macau Affairs office on Wednesday said extremely violent crimes must be severely punished in accordance with the law.

The strongly worded statements by China's central government follow violent clashes between black clad protesters and riot police at Hong Kong's international airport, which saw hundreds of flights halted for a second day in one of the world's busiest transit hubs.

A few dozen protesters remained at the airport on Wednesday while workers scrubbed it clean of blood and debris. Check-in counters reopened to queues of hundreds of weary travellers who had waited overnight for their flights.

Ten weeks of increasingly violent clashes between police and pro-democracy protesters, angered by a perceived erosion of freedoms, have plunged the Asian financial hub into its worst crisis since it reverted from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

China's Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office said it strongly condemned the "near terrorism criminal actions" in Hong Kong including what it called a violent attack on a mainland Chinese journalist and tourist at the airport.

Police condemned violent acts by protesters overnight and said a large group had "harassed and assaulted a visitor and a journalist". Some protesters said they believed one of those men was an undercover Chinese agent, while another was confirmed as a reporter from China's Global Times newspaper.

Five people were detained in the latest disturbances, police said, bringing the number of those arrested since the protests began in June to more than 600.

The protests began in opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed the extradition of suspects for trial in mainland China but have swelled into wider calls for democracy.

Embattled Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has said the city has been pushed into a state of "panic and chaos".

Demonstrators say they are fighting the erosion of the "one country, two systems" arrangement that enshrined some autonomy for Hong Kong when it returned to China in 1997.

The protests represent one of the biggest challenges for Chinese President Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.

In Washington, U.S. President Donald Trump said the Chinese government was moving troops to the border with Hong Kong and urged calm.

China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) has a garrison in Hong Kong but has remained in barracks since the protests started in April. However, the PLA garrison has issued a video showing "anti-riot" exercises, and its top brass have warned violence is "absolutely impermissible".

As Hong Kong's political crisis deepens, China denied a request for two U.S. Navy warships to visit Hong Kong in the coming weeks, officials said.

Security at Hong Kong airport on Wednesday was stricter than usual with several entrances closed, police patrolling and staff checking traveller identification.

Hong Kong's Airport Authority said it would only allow entry for passengers with a boarding pass valid for the next 24 hours and had obtained an interim court injunction to stop people from obstructing operations. Protesters are only allowed to demonstrate in designated areas.

Some protesters expressed remorse for the clashes overnight. One 22-year-old frontliner who identified himself as Pun said protesters needed to re-evaluate their strategy to continue with the fight.

“We are not trying to overthrow the government or cut ourselves off from China. But we fight for our rights; democracy was promised as part of One country Two systems."

Flag carrier Cathay Pacific Airways published a half-page advertisement in the Hong Kong Economic Journal pledging its support for the government and calling for the resumption of the rule of law and social order.

China's aviation regulator demanded last week that Cathay suspend personnel who engaged in or supported protests in Hong Kong from staffing flights into its airspace. The carrier later suspended two pilots.

Property developers Henderson Land Development, Cheung Kong Holdings and Sun Hung Kai Holdings also took out newspaper advertisement in support of the government on Wednesday.

Forward Keys, a flight data company, said the crisis had deterred people from making travel plans to the city, citing a 4.7 percent fall in long-haul bookings to Hong Kong between June 16 and Aug. 9 compared with the same period last year.

Statements of apology from protesters were displayed in the airport on Wednesday, promising to allow passengers to depart, to assist medical staff to carry out their duties and not to hinder the work of the press.

"We are not afraid of facing the issues directly...only afraid of losing your support to the whole movement due to our mistake, and that you give up on fighting."

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2019.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

67 Comments
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All the best Hong Kong! I applaud your bravery and lack of apathy when your personal freedoms are threatened. You could teach the rest of the world about what it means to have a social conscience and the strength to stand up for those beliefs.

We will be watching.

22 ( +29 / -7 )

Since I lived and worked in HK for nearly 6 years, I have been in touch with my local friends in HK (not foreign expats) and they all support and are involved in the current protests.

They know that this could all end with the PLA deployed in the streets and HK forever changed, but they believe the cause is right and must be pursued.

More than anything, they long for true democracy where the CE is elected by the people, not some prearranged selection process that Beijing controls.

Carrie Lam has no legitimacy in their eyes, as she was not chosen by the people.

Truly remarkable people, fighting for a cause they know is probably quixotic!

21 ( +24 / -3 )

@Akie,

You do know what democracy is, right?

The ability for the people to choose their leaders!

When the people are denied that ability and the "leaders" that are chosen without their consent undertake actions against the will of the people, what recourse do the people have??

Absence of democracy results in revolution!

You should know! That is why Mao came to be and the Communists took control of China!

20 ( +23 / -3 )

The bravery of these protesters brings tears to my eyes. I hope so very much that China does not use brutal intervention. On the plus side, the whole world is watching but then again, we were watching 30 years ago, as well.

18 ( +24 / -6 )

Edging ever closer to full scale crackdown.   Like China gives a hoot what the rest of the world thinks.

18 ( +19 / -1 )

@Akie,

zones2surf, tell me which leaders are chosen by majority people, and their popular rating ?

Certainly not China or Hong Kong.

The U.S., yes.

Japan, yes.

The UK, yes.

You may criticize their systems for electing their leaders, but they are democratic. There is a mechanism for the ordinary citizen / voter to select their leader.

But in HK, most certainly not.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

@rlperez@hotmail.com.au,

Do you mean the same as the elites have done to ordinary citizens in the US? Trump is a typical elite who is screwing the average citizen.

"You do know what democracy is, right?

The ability for the people to choose their leaders!"

Many people in the US, mainly US CITIZENS of the US annexed territories, do not have the right to vote or stand for presidency; these are regarded as second class citizens, so I gauss the US is not democratic.

Ahh, yes, typical deflection.

Let's assume Trump is a typical elite screwing the average citizen. Guess what? The voters can vote him out next year. By direct vote.

Can HK voters vote out the insufferable, incompetent Beijing stooge, Carrie Lam?? Nope/

As for the U.S. annexed territories, please be specific. Which "territories?? And, remember, I am talking about the right for HKers to choose the CE, not to choose the Premier of the PRC. Which is where your analogy breaks down!

13 ( +16 / -3 )

@rperez@hotmail.com.au,

zones2surf: Do you consider a President's veto of congress to be democratic? Congress has been elected by the people.

Do you consider signing of Presidential orders to be democratic, these generally bypass congress.

Democracy requires citizens to be fully and honestly informed before voting for a candidate, it requires a candidate to be independent and not be bank rolled by specific interest groups (eg the NRA). Democracy requires not vote rigging or election manipulation, no campaign interference.

What a weak response!!

You do know that a President is able to veto, yes??

And that Congress can override the veto, yes??

And that voters can choose both the President and the members of Congress, yes??

Which means that, if they want a change, they can vote for it, yes??

Do you comprehend this?????

As for candidates being "controlled", well, let's see.... every candidate for CE in HK MUST be approved by Beijing. They are not voted on by the people. And every member of the groups that help choose the CE are dependent on Beijing's blessing.

So, while the U.S. system isn't perfect, at least the ordinary voters have a chance to help select their representatives,

Not so in HK!!!

13 ( +15 / -2 )

@rlperez@hotmail.com.au,

So far US trade sanctions and tariffs have not worked so lets us the HK citizens to advance our cause, lets manipulate them so we can disrupted Chinese commerce.

Right. Because Trump has been such a huge advocate for the protestors in HK.

Oh, wait....

He hasn't and seems to have said this an internal matter for China.

Do you know ordinary HKers?? Do you know why they protest?? Because I do, having lived there for 6 years. I was there in 2014 for Occupy Central.

The lives of ordinary HKers have been screwed by the elites who bow to the will of the mainland authorities. They have absolutely no control over their futures.

But, hey, it must be those dang meddlers from the U.S., the C.I.A., etc.

Right.......

11 ( +14 / -3 )

There are no free elections in HK or mainland China and are not democracies.

They must dance to the wishes of the Red Dragon dictator Xi.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

"The Chinese government condemned what it called horrific violent crimes at Hong Kong's airport . . . "

Yeah, like one Hong Kong policeman firing his beanbag gun right in the face of a female protester blinding her. Boy, she must have been a tough girl to frighten the policeman to use such violence to deter her.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Just learned Royal Thai Air Force is sending 2 aircrafts to evacuate Thai people from HK. Time limit seems to be near.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

HK is much more that 1Mil disgruntled RIOTERS. Democracy is not disrupting people from their daily activities, damaging public property, private property or endangering life. Many in HK just want to get on with their lives and have no interest in the RIOTS but are being prevented from doing so.

I have no idea if you are CCP, but that line is what the CCP is pushing.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

@rlperez@hotmail.com.au,

zones2surf: "As for the U.S. annexed territories, please be specific. Which "territories??"Let me refer you to

 “Citizenship Clause of the 14th Amendment” which does not extend to all American citizens of US territories (which were initially annexed by the US). Not all people in the US have the right to choose who stands for elections and for whom they vote.” These US citizens are not able to vote for a President and have other citizenship restrictions.

For these US citizens, "democracy" does not exist.

So, let's make this simple for you,

HK is an SAR of China.

Puerto Rico is a territory of the U.S.

A citizen of HK cannot vote for the Premier of the PRC. Because NO CITIZEN can vote for the Premier of the PRC. Because no democracy in the PRC. Full stop.

A citizen of Puerto Rico cannot vote for the President of the U.S. because they are a citizen of a territory. But if they were a state they could. Unlike PRC, which has NO democracy.

A citizen of HK cannot vote for the CE of HK. Because the CE candidates are chosen by special interest groups and must be approved by Beijing.

BUT, a citizen of Puerto Rico CAN vote for and choose its Governor. And their various Mayors. Unlike Hong Kong.

The intolerant, fascist, totalitarianCCP hates democracy and demands total control!!

Admit it and accept it!!

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Akie, first they are asking for universal suffrage. Not sure why you deflect for this play on "majority". After if it's going to be a representative democracy or anything else is not yet discussed.

M3M3M3Today 11:13 am JST

Hong Kong was assured political autonomy until 2047, but the violence and disruption gives China a legitimate legal excuse to move in at 20:47 later tonight.

If you followed that's also actually one of the issues, their autonomy has been slowly eroded since, China is not keeping its words on the agreement.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

The brave Hong Kongers with their strong civic consciousness are laying down a blue-print for a people's 21st century resistance to anti-democratic regimes. The shameless intransigence of the so-called "servants of the people" and their refusal to respect or listen to the voices of the citizens is the sole reason for the growing chaos. The ruthless individuals who wield power always use the appeal for "law and order" to blackmail and cajole the cowardly majority, but when that hypocritical stratagem no longer works, the velvet glove comes off and the brutal iron fist of despotism is mercilessly used to terrorize anyone who defies their orders. The Hong Kongers with good reason fed up with the unresponsiveness of the authorities have intelligently identified the airport as the regime's weak spot and are now bringing the crisis swiftly to a head forcing the government either to back down or show their true anti-democratic credentials with the intervention of the Chinese army. But Hong Kong is not Tienanmen and the wound of Hong Kong will fester and the infection will surely spread. Just like Chernobyl for the Soviets the ripping away of "one country, two systems" fig leaf and the crushing of democracy could ultimately prove to be the nemesis of the Beijing regime.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

China's aviation regulator demanded last week that Cathay suspend personnel who engaged in or supported protests in Hong Kong from staffing flights into its airspace. 

Sorry that's not ethical in my mind. Government telling corporations how to run the company? This statement alone is exactly what the Hong Kong people are fighting for. So I guess China will ban me supporting the protests?

8 ( +9 / -1 )

China has to label them as terrorists before making a full attack.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

This situation is quite obviously only going to get worse.

And what did Pres. Trump have to say about the situation:

*"I hope it works out for liberty? (Did Trump choose the wrong word here with liberty because he said it like he was unsure and with a rising intonation.) . . . I hope it works out for everybody including China."*

Trump does love the dictatorships, doesn't he?

I, for one, hope that the Hong Kongers can achieve a situation for Hong Kong of dignity and independence.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I have no idea if you are CCP, but that line is what the CCP is pushing.

I never agree with Strange on anything, but on this one I do.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

violence in China is crime

Except when the cowardly Chinese "communists" and their Hong Kong henchmen use the ugly violence of the police force, triad thugs and the military against unarmed citizens protesting their government's anti-democratic policies. We have two words for this in English: state terrorism.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

We all know the CCP is an oppressive dictatorship; the one thing such can never countenance is opposition or even the semblance of democracy as that utterly undermines their pretence of legitimacy.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

There a large number of HK people who also hold a British passport but that does not mean they want to move county.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The real "terrorists" are the ones in uniform.

I fear for the people of Hong Kong. I fear for any people who stand against the brutal regime in Beijing.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Can you tell us exactly what "freedoms" you are referring to.

The freedoms the right to choose their own destiny without China telling them what they can and can’t do or say or think.

Can you tell us exactly what "true democracy" is and what you are referring to?

The opposite of what these totalitarian regimes want.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Akie

zichi, if they have British passports, why didn't they demolish British properties ? Why wouldn't they demand their voting rights in UK ? What scare them to not doing so ?

I suggest it would be impossible how many protestors involved also hold dual nationality.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

rlperez@hotmail.com.au 

zichi: True; there are many people around the world that hold multiple citizenships and multiple passports. EU countries have a common passport and don't need visas when going from one EU country to another.

Meaning of your comment?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Mainland China has provoked Hong Kong, simple as that, China state media only shows the 'dangerous thug protesters' but most of the protesters are peaceful. The Chinese government lies to their people and lies to the world. America should stand in Solidarity 100 percent with Honk Kong.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Toasted Heretic, you don't have to fear laws if you are not a criminal.

You do when the laws are enforced by a dictatorship oligarchy that does not respect human rights. In such a case the law lacks ethics, and a lack of ethics is to be feared.

Stay strong Hong Kong!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

If protesters are terrorist, then China government is a dictatorship... seems fair, doesn't it?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Freedom. Give people their freedom or they'll get their freedom the difficult way.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

extanker, what compatriot ? This is about justice and justice only. If you were one if the passengers, hurry home to see your wifie, who is expecting a baby, and you were stuck in the middle of violence, and you almost hear the cry of the new born, what would you feel ?

Considering I would want my baby to grow up in a free society, not one trapped under the boot of an oppressive dictatorship, I would accept the delay. Those brave protestors are risking a lot more than I would be just sitting on a plane.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

There are only two people on this planet, good people and bad people. Good people are constructive, while the bad people are destructive. Let the terrorists show their destructive nature and their destructive values.

my more expensive Chinese cracker gives a different version especially if you want democracy, which HK lacks.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

terrorist

a person who uses unlawful violence and intimidation, especially against civilians, in the pursuit of political

aims.

I think Google needs to rewrite the definition... since when the majority of a Country's Population comes out in an "illegal" protest, surely they can not all be declared as Terrorists ? But if so, then maybe China should cut its ties with that Terrorist state - and have nothing more to do with it ?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

"Terror" is a word that was first applied to the regime's violence during the French Revolution, but with the passing of time governments found it expedient to label the actions of anyone who challenged or attempted to overthrow their despotic rule as "terror" and slander the regime's opponents as "terrorists". This disingenuous verbal legerdemain of all governments has enjoyed great success in the 19th and 20th centuries fooling the gullible into believing that violence perpetrated by state organs can never be called "terror". Such is the power of words when twisted to serve the Machiavellian purposes of regimes that have no respect for human rights and the dignity of the individual. The Chinese communists should be wary of dissing their cultural traditions and heed the signs that "Heaven" may one day withdraw their mandate to rule.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

you don't have to fear laws if you are not a criminal.

or a journalist. or a dissident. or a protester. Or a teacher. Or someone who happened to say the wrong thing about the President-for-Life in front of the wrong person.

You forgot a few types of people that need to fear Chinese laws.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Let's face some hard truths about this; The protestors are attempting to force a confrontation with China at a time when China is at the height of its power and those who might support Hong Kong independence in the west are either not in power or extremely weak. It's suicidal and foolish to make any move now. Hong Kong was assured political autonomy until 2047, but the violence and disruption gives China a legitimate legal excuse to move in at 20:47 later tonight. The smarter game plan was always to wait China out, because whether China makes it to 2047 is still an open question. They should have waited to see if a Gorbachev-style reformer comes to power in the CCP, or for unrest to kick off on the mainland first, or for an economic crisis to hit. Violence and disruption was always going to be a last resort in 2047, not a first restort in 2019 when time is still on Hong Kong's side.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

@rlperez@hotmail.com.au

I don't necessarily disagree with you. My comment is just an observation how poorly planned the protest movement is from a strategic point of view, not that I support it.

My ultimate sympathies are with the silent majority in HK who've planned their lives, careers, businesses and economic futures around 2047 but might have it all turned upside down through no fault of their own.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Protestors have the right to demonstrate however I do not condone disrupting the lives of people who just want to go on with their daily bussines.

If they do that the government has the duty to take certain measures however calling them terrorists and using violence are not acceptable in any way.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You know things are pretty bad/desperate when ppl (non brits) wave the union jack & 'wish' (well almost, aren't 'that' hopeless/miserable yet) they were still under British rule!

Terrifying scenes ( i mean the flags)!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Just quoting Indian philosopher and poet Sri Aurobindo on democracy (about 100 years ago) :

Democracy in Europe is the rule of the Cabinet minister, the corrupt deputy or the self-seeking capitalist masqued by the occasional sovereignty of a wavering populace; Socialism in Europe is likely to be the rule of the official and policeman masqued by the theoretic sovereignty of an abstract State. It is chimerical to enquire which is the better system; it would be difficult to decide which is the worse.

The gain of democracy is the security of the individual’s life, liberty and goods from the caprices of the tyrant one or the selfish few; its evil is the decline of greatness in humanity.
0 ( +1 / -1 )

In an ideal World...

The UK should grant HK Citizens the right of abode within the UK, and if the rest of the World helped with relocation fees, HK could be left pretty much empty - a ghost state. It would be a sad situation for HK'ers.. but really positive for the UK given the enthusiasm for Business that HK'ers have at heart. "Two fingers up to the CCP we're out-a-here"... would be an apt phrase.

Sadly this wont happen, as due to the Cost of property most people are up to their neck (and beyond) in debt. And given the current situation Negative Equity is going to be a more likely outcome - which will inevitably hurt the Banks - HSBC being one. So for the HK Residents, the future is bleak - trying to rebel against the CCP is like trying to avoid Death & Taxes ... China will Take full control over HK in '47 and unless something dramatic happens to the CCP... (wishful thinking in the positive sense), then what's changed then from now ? Your Mortgage will probably be well beyond '47....

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The UK, yes.

Actually, the people of the UK don't get to choose... Johnson was installed by Conservative party members. A tiny fraction of the voting public.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Toasted Heretic

The bravery of these protesters brings tears to my eyes. I hope so very much that China does not use brutal intervention.

Rest easy, T.H.

Professor Gregory Clark has already written China’s denial of a Tiananmen Square-style massacre in Hong Kong. He has even gotten a statement from the same Italian film crew who told him they had seen nothing in Tiananmen Square that they’ve already not seen anything in Hong Kong.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

I hope things resolve peacefully and also I hope the Hong Kong people get some say in their future. I doubt this will happen however.

I hope the HK women do not end up getting sterilized as are some women in detention camps in Xinjiang. China has said those arrested there (including those who have done nothing wrong) are a threat of "future extremism"

https://www.news.com.au/world/asia/chinas-sickening-acts-on-female-prisoners-at-reeducation-camps/news-story/34d531c19a5bb060881a76ac8b478609

I am starting to realize this (the Hong Kong related issue and others) is all China's internal affairs so it is best for me (as a westerner) to butt out and do not ever set a foot in China.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The unfortunate truth is that the whole thing farcical.

The protesters are not going to win any freedoms or separation.

This is just stalling for the inevitable.

Which is the government with Chinese characteristics of one system, one party, one catastrophe

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The protester must focus on demand what they have started with. They must avoid not to cross the line. I read HK Governor Carries Lam said the extradition bill that sparked the territory's biggest political crisis in decades is dead.

What more the protester wanted from HK Governor Carrie Lam?

Now they are demanding HK Governor Carrie Lam to resign. I don't think it's appropriate demand. She was elected as HK Governor by HK people and she said she doesn't support the bill.

If they think the next Governor will softer than Carrie Lam and then they were wrong. All HK Governors have complied with the Chinese Government's policy.

The protester must avoid, they are not going to dance to Communist Government's tune. Now the protesters are almost falling into Communist Government's bucket lists for HK. The Communist Chinese Government can take control over HK completely if they used destructive activity and obstruction of foreign travellers at HK Airport.

The HK citizen can have some freedom and democracy in Chinese Government's one country, two systems, but that democracy allowed by the Communist Chinese Government has limited. They should not forget HK is Chinese sovereignty even though the Communist Government practice one country two systems policy.

They must avoid violence and destructive activity. They must demonstrate peacefully if they wanted international support. Their obstructive behavior and disturbing of travellers at HK Airport will not get sympathy and support from international.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

zichi: "Meaning of your comment?"

Just agreeing with you. Many people have more that one citizenship and passport and they choose which of their passports they choose.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Roger Jolly: "If protesters are terrorist, then China government is a dictatorship"

A very profound and educated statement.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Toasted Heretic, you don't have to fear laws if you are not a criminal.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

zichi, what do you mean ? These demonstrators are the best example of democracy in HK.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

8T: America should stand in Solidarity 100 percent with Honk Kong.

And with Kashmir and with the Palestinians.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I'm sure that if Trump praised the protesters many people tipping their hats to them would suddenly jump over to China's side. Just sayin'…

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

"The UK should grant HK Citizens the right of abode within the UK,"

When the UK ruled HK, they regarded the Chinese population as "coolies" and they did not have the same rights has their British masters, that why there were so many protests and riots against British rule.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

zichi: True; there are many people around the world that hold multiple citizenships and multiple passports. EU countries have a common passport and don't need visas when going from one EU country to another.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

mmwkdw: "The UK should grant HK Citizens the right of abode within the UK, and if the rest of the World helped with relocation fees, HK could be left pretty much empty - a ghost state."

If the UK gave all the people in its ex-colonies, the countries that the UK invaded and colonised, the right of abode in the UK it would sink under the weight of the people.

The world will never help with relocation because many nations are still racist and xenophobic. Also, the "right of abode" is not the same as citizenship, so these people would be stateless. Would the UK give black South African's the right of abode or the Australian aborigines the right of abode?

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

zichi, if they have British passports, why didn't they demolish British properties ? Why wouldn't they demand their voting rights in UK ? What scare them to not doing so ?

-9 ( +0 / -9 )

mmwkdw, those hooligans are worthless once they leave China, abandon their Chinese citizenship. No countries would accept them, they are just trouble makers and stupid ignoramus. Please let China know if there is any such a country as soon as possible.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

zones2surf: "As for the U.S. annexed territories, please be specific. Which "territories??"

Let me refer you to

 “Citizenship Clause of the 14th Amendment” which does not extend to all American citizens of US territories (which were initially annexed by the US). Not all people in the US have the right to choose who stands for elections and for whom they vote.” These US citizens are not able to vote for a President and have  other citizenship restrictions.

For these US citizens, "democracy" does not exist.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

M3M3M3: Fully agree. HK is much more that 1Mil disgruntled RIOTERS. Democracy is not disrupting people from their daily activities, damaging public property, private property or endangering life. Many in HK just want to get on with their lives and have no interest in the RIOTS but are being prevented from doing so.

-14 ( +4 / -18 )

zones2surf: Do you consider a President's veto of congress to be democratic? Congress has been elected by the people.

Do you consider signing of Presidential orders to be democratic, these generally bypass congress.

Democracy requires citizens to be fully and honestly informed before voting for a candidate, it requires a candidate to be independent and not be bank rolled by specific interest groups (eg the NRA). Democracy requires not vote rigging or election manipulation, no campaign interference.

-15 ( +3 / -18 )

zones2surf: " Do you know why they protest?? Because I do, having lived there for 6 years." Well let us all into the secrete.

"The lives of ordinary HKers have been screwed by the elites"

Do you mean the same as the elites have done to ordinary citizens in the US? Trump is a typical elite who is screwing the average citizen.

"You do know what democracy is, right?

The ability for the people to choose their leaders!"

Many people in the US, mainly US CITIZENS of the US annexed territories, do not have the right to vote or stand for presidency; these are regarded as second class citizens, so I gauss the US is not democratic.

-17 ( +4 / -21 )

CrazyJoe: "I applaud your bravery and lack of apathy when your personal freedoms are threatened."

Can you tell us exactly what "freedoms" you are referring to.

zones2surf: " they long for true democracy"

Can you tell us exactly what "true democracy" is  and what you are referring to?

-18 ( +5 / -23 )

If this is democracy, what is chaos ?

-19 ( +9 / -28 )

Pro-democracy ? OMG.

-20 ( +6 / -26 )

M3M3M3: "It's suicidal and foolish to make any move now."

"The move is being  now because the West is trying to contain China's economic growth. How dare China have an economy as great as the US. How dare China have a military as great as the US. So far US trade sanctions and tariffs have not worked so lets us the HK citizens to advance our cause, lets manipulate them so we can disrupted Chinese commerce.

-20 ( +3 / -23 )

zones2surf, tell me which leaders are chosen by majority people, and their popular rating ?

-26 ( +3 / -29 )

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