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Johnson says UK will quit Brexit talks if no deal by Oct 15

33 Comments
By Jill Lawless

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33 Comments
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Red mist, anger and betrayal. A toxic mix when concentrated within and agenda.

Unable to suppress emotion politically, no furniture to kick, no pillow to punch.

Frustration, intense irritability succumbs to impatience, resentment, ultimately giving way to pique and exasperation.

The danger is a complete repeal, revocation of the signed withdrawal agreement.    

UK planning legislation that will override parts of Brexit withdrawal agreement

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-trade/uk-planning-legislation-that-will-override-parts-of-brexit-withdrawal-agreement-ft-idUSKBN25X0X2

https://www.ft.com/content/9906e0d4-0c29-4f5f-9cb0-130c75a2f7a7

I don’t believe Johnson politically, emotionally ever wanted a trade deal.

Cummings and Johnson agenda was always to focus on the existing:

The EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement ….

https://ec.europa.eu/info/european-union-and-united-kingdom-forging-new-partnership/eu-uk-withdrawal-agreement_en

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This bumbling idiot never had a plan, never expected Brexit, and can't even put on a shirt without mucking up everything. Bumbling, stumbling, and stuttering (no offence to those who have a real stutter). This buffoon stutters because he thinks it and his hairstyle makes him more endearing.

Him being stuck in the air, hanging on a zip wire, waving two union jacks will be his legacy.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Sorry my ft link can only be viewed once before pay wall restrictions....

Here is the Guardians view.......

Brexit: Johnson to override EU withdrawal agreement.....

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/sep/06/five-weeks-clinch-brexit-deal-uk-move-boris-johnson-to-say

Neither Cummings or Johnson do "negotiation", Both follow an agenda.

A UK government source told the Guardian the plan was part of the preparation for a no-deal exit that would present a number of new barriers to trade from Northern Ireland – and accepted that the move was likely to blow up at the negotiations this week.

Labour said the prime minister was “threatening to renege on the UK’s legal obligations” and called it “an act of immense bad faith: one that would be viewed dimly by future trading partners and allies around the world”.,,,

The briefings are a means to prepare the ground politically to complete this agenda.

The outcome could have profound consequences for EU citizens residing in the UK that have been afforded settled status under the government's residency scheme.

There is also the question of Northern Ireland? The GFA states that the boarder must be seamless to the south.

The UK Government could ultimately just refuse to recognize EU requirement for boarder checks customs regulations. Sighting the GFA as an overriding political factor.

Barnier may have overplayed his hand.

I don't ever really believe Barnier remotely understood, Cumming and Johnson agenda was poles apart from Theresa May/Oliver Robbins.

In the middle of a pandemic. No good will come of this.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Boris looks more and more like that "guy" in the US.

"I want it my way ..... or it's a no-go!"

C'mon, you asked for it (the Brexit), you got it, now you have to live with the consequences!

Stop crying and whining like a baby and be(come) a man ....... if you know what that means!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Why would the UK pump public money into UK industries if, as Boris claims, a No-deal break will be good for Britain?

Because they know Boris doesn’t understand basic economics?

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The economic consequences or political repercussions?

After a relationship, some forty-one year’s, fraught or otherwise?

This document/report is a technical assessment from 2018, so pre pandemic.   

Assessing the impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on regions and cities in EU27,

https://cor.europa.eu/Documents/Migrated/news/impact-brexit.pdf

Move directly to page 9……

Regardless of an agreed  FTA the consequences are clear, add in the economic and social  outcomes from the pandemic and it becomes the calamitous makings of a total breakdown of faith and trust.

Give and take. Find a way to politically restart the process.

Look for a solution that takes in the "whole" not the "sum" of its "parts"

In essence a future relationship built on every single element, fishing, etc etc. moving to a final conciliation/conclusion.

Be aware also move than 300 states and countries will want to play catch up to access UK market.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The hapless "Joker" Johnson and his merry band of buffoons will "take back control", most likely without a deal with the EU. Buyers' remorse will surely color 2021. In the meantime, it appears that tiny Covid will be "taking control" as the wretched Tories send society into a tailspin.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

The take back control mantra, get Brexit done was/is the stuff of sound bites and strap lines.

After 41 years of integration, legislative frameworks, regulatory directives etc etc, unraveling will take years not months. Nothing straight forward here

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I expect a hard brexit with negotiations taking place and a trade deal AFTER the repercussions of a hard brexit come to light.

I STILL hope and pray for a CANZUK agreement between the UK Canada OZ and NZ.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

It's almost as if...the UK...isn't as powerful and relevant a nation on its own as it was when it was a member of the bloc. Huh. Who would have thought? Do Johnson and his ilk realize the Empire's over? In the end, the UK's getting exactly what it voted for: leaving the third largest economy on Earth in order to become a sad, powerless island off the coast of the economy that really matters. Might not have been what Brexiteers hoped for. Might not have been what Brexiteers wanted. But its what Brexiteers voted for. So good luck. You'll need it.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

the UK's getting exactly what it voted for

Roughly 17.5 million people voted for Brexit, leaving not only themselves but also the other 50 million of the population to face a bleak future.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

In the end, the UK's getting exactly what it voted for:leaving the third largest economy on Earth in order to become a sad, powerless island off the coast of the economy that really matters. Might not have been what Brexiteers hoped for. Might not have been what Brexiteers wanted. But its what Brexiteers voted for. So good luck. You'll need it.

I like the way you have transplanted what you think will/wish to happen onto what people voted for.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Another referendum please.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Onwards and into the abyss.

Prime Minister Cummings knows what he's doing.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

the Financial Times reported that Johnson’s government was planning domestic legislation that would water down commitments to maintaining an open border between the UK’s Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland that it has already signed up to.

Playing with fire, that. They haven't gone away, you know.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Perfidious Albion reverting to type: Johnson and his unelected puppeteer Cummings run a coach and horses through the Good Friday Agreement, threatening Irish peace.

More momentum for a successful IndyRef2 in Scotland, followed by Irish Unity.

Thanks, Boris!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

More momentum for a successful IndyRef2 in Scotland, followed by Irish Unity.

Something good has to come out of this mess, aye.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

They haven't gone away, you know.

I was hoping they had (a Ghearóid).

Something good has to come out of this mess, aye.

Tá ceart agat.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Scots voted to stay in the union. I hope non-Scots are not telling the people of this fine country what they should do. A second referendum and how people should vote is a matter for the Scottish people.

Sounds a bit patronizing to me. I hope non-Scots are better versed in the realities, for better or worse, of an independent Scotland as the people who voted. I wouldn’t have the arrogance to second guess the Scots ( particularly Glaswegians ).

Maybe they can start lecturing the Welsh next.

Anyway, Johnson is a car crash.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The Scots voted to stay in the union.

If I remember correctly, fear of being outside the EU was a major factor in that.

I hope non-Scots are not telling the people of this fine country what they should do

All of Westminster and their dogs were doing precisely that the last time.

Let's not forget that 62% of Scotland voted Remain. Interesting times ahead.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Good! Direction at last - regardless which way people think it takes us... but it is, a direction!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I hope non-Scots are not telling the people of this fine country what they should do

All of Westminster and their dogs were doing precisely that the last time.

Some of them were Scots. Those establishment Westminster figures Alistair Darling and Gordon Brown were 2 of the big hitters in the remain argument. These are 2 men who’ve probably forgotten more about economics and Scotland than you or I will ever know.

Intelligent and decent men. Hardly baying hounds.

Cameron’s contribution was basically to tell Scotland that one day the Tories will be out of office. He was deservedly ignored.

I’ve read Irish people who want a united Ireland seeming to think Scotland should be independent. I don’t know what business it is of theirs to tell the Scots what they should do. The ‘perfidious Albion’ childishness doesn’t help either - join the modern millennium.

By the way, I’m no British or English patriot - if Scotland votes out in a future referendum, good luck to them. None of my business, and to be brutally honest, I don’t think it’s any of yours either.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

None of my business, and to be brutally honest, I don’t think it’s any of yours either.

I think you are entitled to an opinion, as is anyone else.

Polls seem to suggest that support for Scottish independence has increased since the Brexit vote (and perhaps more so since Johnson became PM). Let's say it's about 50-50. At the last independence referendum, leaving aside the flag waving nutters on both sides, I'd say most people were weighing up the possible costs and benefits. Not an easy decision. It's probably more difficult now given Scotland has no land borders with the EU. But if the UK's situation next year is the mess many are predicting, I'd guess the support for independence will increase.

Meanwhile, it may be time to stock up on the toilet paper again. :-)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bojo is asking for a resumption of "The Troubles" if he "just moves on" and abrogates the agreements regarding the Irish border. I can see a situation where Scotland leaves the UK, Northern Ireland devolves into sectarian warfare and the EU backs Irish reunification possibly with more than just words. I can also see situations where Britain, or what is left of it, is mostly locked out of trade with the EU by retaliatory tariffs and maritime confrontations over fishing.

Scotland has to worry that the Spanish will block their entry into the EU as a measure to deter the Catalonian independence movement. The Scots might want to engage in some quiet diplomacy before holding another referendum on independence from the UK.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

At the last independence referendum, leaving aside the flag waving nutters on both sides

Flag-wavers/nationalists always need to be ignored - English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, British. Too much emotion and not enough practicality.

Some tell us they’d be prepared to see their country take a financial hit for independence.

The comfortably off can afford it. Others...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I like the way you have transplanted what you think will/wish to happen onto what people voted for.

Oh, Tangerine, I don’t have to ‘transplant’ anything. There is no speculation. Brexiteers have been telling the world those exact things for years. They wanted to get out of the EU. They hoped that the UK’s geopolitical status would remain unchanged. They voted with these misbegotten beliefs in their minds. What they got is being bulldozed by the reality that the UK’s geopolitical position was contingent on its membership in the EU. When it was in the EU, it had clout. It had influence. It could bargain with global superpowers as if it were still one. But it isn’t. The sun set on the Empire long ago and with it went its status as a world power. The UK on its own is nowhere NEAR as powerful and relevant as it was while part of the bloc and the people are rapidly realizing that it no longer has the clout to make demands of major economies. It traded its status and seat at the table for what? Fewer Romanians and Bulgarians? The warm, fuzzy feeling that comes with thinking about vaguely patriotic abstractions like ‘national sovereignty’ or whatever? As I said. They didn’t get what they wanted. They didn’t get what they hoped for. They got exactly what they voted for. And good luck to them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Some tell us they’d be prepared to see their country take a financial hit for independence.

Is that such a bad thing? If you are told that under the current UK setup you are reliant on the UK for wealth, is that not an incentive to become self-reliant and try to boost your wealth?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Is that such a bad thing? If you are told that under the current UK setup you are reliant on the UK for wealth, is that not an incentive to become self-reliant and try to boost your wealth?

The operant word, though, is try. They can try as much as they like, but that’s no guarantee they’ll succeed. Boris is trying to cajole the EU into getting what he wants, by the UK doesn’t have the clout to succeed in doing so. Why does the UK have that the EU wants or needs? The answer is precious little. The people of Britain are learning the hard truth that the bargaining chips they thought were theirs were just borrowed from the EU the whole time. It’s like the trust fund baby who suddenly realizes how little money he actually has when daddy dearest cuts him off.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Flag-wavers/nationalists always need to be ignored

Absolutely. You can't eat a flag, after all.

Where do we start with Brexit? Schoolboy rivalry from Eaton? Vulture capitalists cynically exploiting Austerity-damaged neglected regions with their campaign of mendacious misinformation?

Arguably it's (as ever) a class issue deftly reframed with flags-for-all into a nationalism issue. It was thus in NI through its 99 years of dysfunction. It's thus in the fast-track/slow-track England of today.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Brandon Lewis, Northern Ireland secretary, to Tory colleague Sir Bob Neill, when asked for an assurance that nothing in the internal market bill being published tomorrow would breach international legal obligations. Lewis replied:

*I would say to my honourable friend that, yes, this does break international law in a very specific and limited way. We’re taking the power to disapply the EU law concept of direct effect required by article 4 in certain very tightly defined circumstances.*

Jo Maugham QC Tweeted:

"My client only broke the law in a specific and limited way" is amongst the rarer pleas advanced by Counsel in written or oral submissions.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The head of the UK government’s legal department has become the latest prominent civil servant to quit, reportedly over its decision to override parts of the Brexit deal on Northern Ireland.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/sep/08/uks-top-legal-civil-servant-quits-over-brexit-deal-changes-jonathan-jones

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I was hoping they had (a Ghearóid).

You never know. There's always the chance of a revival - anything can happen in these uncertain times.

Tá ceart agat.

Sometimes. Aspiring to a united Ireland doesn't necessarily mean one is an extremist - much like aspiring to leave the EU doesn't mean one is a racist. It needs to be done fairly, though. Something which the British government is seemingly incapable of.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Flag-wavers/nationalists always need to be ignored - English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, British. Too much emotion and not enough practicality.

Irish nationalism is a different kettle of fish. It's quite unique, it's roots are in pushing for a 32 county socialist Republic - inclusive for all.

Some tell us they’d be prepared to see their country take a financial hit for independence.

Some tell us that our country would fail/be worse off/be at risk etc if we go it our own way. Usual colonialists/imperialists etc.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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