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A controversial comeback for a highly prized tuna

16 Comments
By PATRICK WHITTLE

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16 Comments
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I blame the Wicked Tuna TV program for the ongoing slaughter of these noble creatures.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

The quotas should stay as they are and penalties should be severe for those who breech them. Just because they are more abundant in one part of the ocean does not mean it's time for an all out slaughter.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

 A single bluefin sold for more than $1.75 million at an auction in Japan in 2013.

Don't use this as the guide please. It was a PR stunt at the first auction of the New Year.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Recovery is not implicate on a one year season, the species "might " have recovered somewhat but certainly not to commercial levels. Get back to me in 10 years.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

They'll just be wiped out again. So much for "stewardship"

1 ( +8 / -7 )

The main reason tunas are in trouble is not related to general overfishing. It is due to the large healthy fish being targeted for generations. This has left only the smaller and weaker fish to reproduce. It has been documented that many species of tunas are getting genetically smaller due to the targeting of larger fish for many generations. This is what has lead to large fish being so rare. There should not only be a bag limit or quota on tuna catches. There should also be a size limit to leave the bigger fish to breed.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

I stopped eating tuna about 10yrs ago......while this blurb appears to show some supposed recovery, I don't & WONT buy it!

This sounds very short sighted & yeah SLOT limits are sorely needed, you have to let some of the biggest tuna escape the dreaded auctions of Tsukiji!

And lets remember it mostly DOESNT MATTER which countries fishermen catch the tuna, they still mostly fly to JAPAN which the prime reason stocks are in such a crappy state now for many decades!

1 ( +6 / -5 )

The amount of tuna is approximated yearly. A sustainable harvest is good for the sea, fisherman, people who eat it and conservationists. 17% seems high.

Govts have this idea that doing things in jumps is a good idea. Why? If my taxes are going up or down, to minimize impact to the economy, I'd like to see 1% changes per year until the desired rate is achieved. That way if anything bad begins along the way, adjustments are possible. Why wouldn't this be better for tuna fishing too?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Japan can not be blamed for over eating bluefin Tuna. Japanese population is getting smaller. It is other Nations who now can afford expensive fish who are increasing their eating of Tuna. Hunting and eating Tuna ia not part of these cultures, but in Japan it is.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

The cautionary priciple dictates that it should be taken off the menu. Human's should stop being so selfish and short sighted and start thinking more sustainably.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Tasty

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Apart from fatty tuna, Salmon is the best for sushi and sashimi and it can be farmed unlike tuna.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Farmed Atlantic Salmon is currently the most popular sushi fish in Japan, having exceeded Bluefin Tuna. Kinki University has a few years ago successfully farmed Bluefin Tuna from eggs and is already shipping the product to market. The demand for Bluefin Tuna has exploded not just as a result of Japanese domestic consumption but the popularity of sushi worldwide from the US, Europe, Russia to China. Further successful farming of Bluefin Tuna is the only way that this increased demand can be met.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

catch and release better

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Good to hear stocks are back up for this incredibly delicious fish! Will be hoping to see some lower prices for Sushi, and other seafood, around the corner

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Apart from fatty tuna, Salmon is the best for sushi and sashimi and it can be farmed unlike tuna.

Do you know the history of salmon in Japan? It has nothing to do with farming either!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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