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After Canada legalizes pot, industry eyes rest of the world

35 Comments
By Rob Gillies, Gene Johnson and Tracey Lindeman

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35 Comments
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Japan in the year 3000 lol. After everyone realizes that alcohol and cigarettes are way worse. Took awhile didn’t it?

10 ( +11 / -1 )

It will never happen in any central Asian country. Australia has already relaxed a lot of the laws, but they have become much more strict on driving and operating machinery under the influence, which carry hefty fines.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The economic benefits alone should convince politicians to legalize the stuff. It's still fairly early days in US states like Colorado and Washington where it has been legalized it, but so far the economic positives have far outweighed any negatives. Same with the health side of the issue.

Not to mention allowing individuals to make decisions for themselves instead of some almighty government.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Even on a low income or unemployment, you can afford internet, some games, beer and a bong. Doesn't really get much better than that.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I don't care about the smoking part, but Japan should at least consider legalizing medical marijuana.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Guess who is getting my tax dollars, if you know what I mean? Not Japan. Places like Canada will reap in extra sales tax from me.

"It will never happen in any central Asian country." Not true Malaysia, belive it or not, is already in talks to allow medical marijuana. Surprise surprise, something Japan will not even talk about talking to consider talking about the possibility of discussing the possible testing of medical marijuana.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Flights from Canada will surely be closely inspected - dogs and human sniffers alike, and anyone caught deported.  I don't know for sure, but a medical certificate probably will not help in the slightest.   Check... passport, visa, urine sample, place of stay, customs form...

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@Omachi

I doubt it. Have they been giving urine samples to everyone arriving from California then ?

Not on the flight I took from San Francisco earlier this year. Not even a question about dope on arrival.

Pot can be bought from shops all over the Bay area.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I wonder what effect this will have on the social mobility of the poor. Once mom and dad get their dope habit on, does it mean kiddies get to take care of them by dropping out of school, or do they just make it a family affair and give up completely?

I also wonder how much the government has considered this kind of thing. From all accounts, not too much.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

I wonder what effect this will have on the social mobility of the poor.

No different from the last 40 to 50 years where everyone has being doing it anyway. What rock have you been living under ?

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I  wonder what effect this will have on the social mobility of the poor. Once mom and dad get their dope habit on, does it mean kiddies get to take care of them by dropping out of school, or do they just make it a family affair and give up completely?

Is it only the poor that are affected by recreational drug use?

Anyone who wanted it could get access to dope anyway. Also, there is another substances out there that is rather more dangerous but also legal - alcohol. Alchohol is also addictive, more than cannabis.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Canada raking in the dough, including US border tourists money

2 ( +2 / -0 )

How about for Japan in the future?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

sourpuss

I wonder what effect this will have on the social mobility of the poor. 

Madverts

No different from the last 40 to 50 years where everyone has being doing it anyway. What rock have you been living under ?

Some people may 'have been living under a rock' but to those who say this unto others I say, "and what have you been smoking"...?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

"alcohol and cigarettes are way worse."

They are not 'way worse'.

That being said, government should, for the most part, stay out of people's lives - until their actions directly infringe on the rights of another. Pot laws, seat belt laws, traffic cams, and countless others infringe on the most basic of all human rights: The pursuit of happiness.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@ Daniel Donaldson

They are not 'way worse'.

They most certainly are. Look at all of the stories we regularly see here about men committing crimes only to claim they were too drunk to remember. Nobody who has had a puff is going to get involved in criminal acts or violence - they're far to relaxed. Likewise drink driving...

As for cigarettes, evidence suggests that marijuana is not addictive but rather habitual - subtle difference, really - while the nicotine in fags make them highly addictive.

Another interesting question. Would anybody smoking dope in the Canadian embassy in Tokyo be liable for prosecution? Wouldn't that be considered to be sovereign Canadian territory...?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Next step, Tobacco Company to give license to produce Marijuana Cigarette and selling by vending machine. I like Marijuana. I'm happy to smoke Marijuana if Australian Government has followed Canadian Government.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Anyone else buying weed stocks?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How about for Japan in the future?

Not a chance. Drugs are drugs; they are banned.

Why is Canada promoting drug abusing?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Not a chance. Drugs are drugs; they are banned.

Yes, but a relevant question might be, why is cannabis banned in Japan?

The Japanese people had a long history with the plant's cultivation and use. I had a childhood friend who's grandmother had a beautiful antique kimono that was decorated with cannabis themed embroidery.

The laws enacted to criminalize cannabis were forced on the Japanese people, by the occupational forces of the U.S., not for public health reasons but because of the Americans anti cannabis bias.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Marijuana today---hasheesh tomorrow? Visit Egypt to see what happens to the populace.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

All the "progressives"/leftist on this site with their unreal take on reality are dope smokers - now I understand!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

All the "progressives"/leftist on this site with their unreal take on reality are dope smokers - now I understand!

You make it sound like there is something wrong with that.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

strangerland, no way, man, everythings garroooovy!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Kuya808

Its all the fault of that nasty old US again!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Why is Canada promoting drug abusing?

They're not. Maybe you should look into what Canada is promoting before making statements that are clearly incorrect to anyone who has taken any time to look into it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

strangerland, no way, man, everythings garroooovy!

Nice sarcasm, but you notice how no one can come up with an actual reason?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Its all the fault of that nasty old US again!

Actually, it is. The reason it is illegal, is because back in the '30s, a newspaper owner, William Randolph Hearst, who also owned timber to make paper. He didn't want hemp, the non-psychoactive version of cannabis, to be used for making newspapers, as it would hurt his profitability in timber. So he started using his newspapers to spread propaganda about minorities (specifically black people and mexicans) using 'marijuana', a new term they coined out of propaganda (it was previously called cannabis). Through his propaganda campaign, he was able to get marijuana made illegal, which the US then pushed upon other countries - including Japan, after the war. Cannabis was not previously illegal in Japan.

The reason Cannabis is illegal in most of the world is because the US pushed for that, and the reason it is illegal in Japan, is because the US made it that way after the war.

This time it actually is the fault of the US.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Strangerland, thanks for the anti-US history lesson.

opium and cocaine were legal and freely available about a hundred years ago. Did that nasty William Randolph Hearst spoil that one for everyone too?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Simon, thanks for your 'liberal' discouragement of free speech.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Mahesvara-of-JapanToday  04:01 am JST

How about for Japan in the future?

Not a chance. Drugs are drugs; they are banned.

So basically... drugs shouldn't be made available because they're illegal, and they're illegal because they're drugs?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Simon, and your typical left ploy of putting words in themouths of thise you disagree with. why doyou interpret 'dope smoking' as 'substance abuse' ?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

No different from the last 40 to 50 years where everyone has being doing it anyway. What rock have you been living under ?

Haha. I guess your post is representative of the 11 downvotes I got.

I just worry that with legalization, the usage will increase among society's most vulnerable. Regardless of what you may think, not everyone has had access to drug dealers, and some have shunned drug use for the stigma or for moral reasons. Yes, even poor people... Now, with government approval, these same people can just pop down to the corner store or go online and get hooked up without any qualms about it. After all, it's legal. The government has spoken. The fact that the government did very little research into how this would affect society at large is pretty scary, though. They did it on schedule, regardless whether everyone is ready. Read the municipal news in Canada, and you'll see that they truly aren't.

Is it only the poor that are affected by recreational drug use?

Obviously you're being facetious.

The point is that when people with little money and few job prospects start dropping out of life because of their habit (and despite what the pro-dope crowd says, we've known for years about the folks who got hooked and just seemed to give up everything else in life), the only place they can go is down. While drug abuse is not limited to the poor, they are the ones who suffer disproportionately.

I'm not necessarily anti-legalization. I just can't stand the mindless, lemming-like thinking that goes on with any thred about legalizing drugs. Sure, I can see the increased tax benefits, sure, the possible reduction in crime makes sense, at least theoretically. But it's as if any negative information about marijuana is seen as sacrilegious. There's very little balance in the discussion.

Like it or not folks, it's not going to be all bread and roses with legalization.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

opium and cocaine were legal and freely available about a hundred years ago. Did that nasty William Randolph Hearst spoil that one for everyone too?

Unlike the direct and proven connection between Hearst and marijuana prohibition, I haven’t heard any connection between he and those substances. Have you?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I just worry that with legalization, the usage will increase among society's most vulnerable. 

They can already go get drunk. Marijuana is a preferable alternative.

Anyways, why should the rest of us who are responsible be prohibited because some are not? Whatever happened to personal accountability,

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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