Virus Outbreak Asia
People wait to be processed after arriving to receive the Moderna coronavirus vaccine at a mass vaccination center in Tokyo on May 24. Photo: Carl Carl Court/Pool via AP, File
world

After slow starts, some Asian vaccination rates now soaring

78 Comments
By DAVID RISING and SOPHENG CHEANG

When Cambodia rolled out COVID-19 vaccines, lines stretched down entire streets and people left their shoes out to save their places as they sheltered from the sun. But three months into its campaign, just 11% of the population had received at least one dose. In far wealthier Japan, it took two weeks longer to reach that level.

Now both countries boast vaccination rates that rank among the world's best. They are two of several nations in the Asia-Pacific region that got slow starts to their immunization campaigns but have since zoomed past the United States and many nations in Europe.

The countries with high rates include both richer and poorer ones, some with larger populations and some with smaller. But all have experience with infectious diseases, like SARS, and strong vaccine-procurement programs, many of which knew to spread their risk by ordering from multiple manufacturers.

Most started vaccinating relatively late due to complacency amid low infection rates, initial supply issues and other factors. But by the time they did, soaring death tolls in the United States, Britain and India helped persuade even the skeptical to embrace the efforts.

“I did worry, but at the moment we are living under the threat of COVID-19. There is no option but to be vaccinated,” said Rath Sreymom, who rushed to get her daughter, 5-year-old Nuth Nyra, a shot once Cambodia opened its program to her age group this month.

Cambodia was one of the earlier countries in the region to start its vaccination program with a Feb. 10 launch — still two months after the United States and Britain began theirs. As elsewhere in the region, the rollout was slow, and by early May, as the delta variant started to spread rapidly, only 11% of its 16 million people had gotten at least their first shot, according to Our World in Data. That's about half the rate reached in the United States during the same timeframe and a third of the UK.’s.

Today Cambodia is 78% fully vaccinated — compared to 58% in the U.S. It is now offering booster shots and looking at extending its program to 3- and 4-year-olds.

From the beginning, it has seen strong demand for the vaccine, with the rollout to the general public in April coinciding with a massive surge of cases in India, from which grim images emerged of pyres of bodies outside overwhelmed crematoria.

Prime Minister Hun Sen leveraged his close ties with Beijing to procure nearly 37 million doses from China, some of which were donated. He declared last week that Cambodia's “victory of vaccination” could not have happened without them. The country also received large donations from the U.S., Japan, Britain and from the international COVAX program.

Still, it took time to get sufficient supplies, and many countries in the region that started their programs later struggled even more, especially when the region’s major producer, India, suspended vaccine exports during its spring surge.

“Certainly getting the supply in place was really important for the countries that have done particularly well,” said John Fleming, the Asia-Pacific head of health for the Red Cross. “Then there’s the demand creation side — clearly this is about getting a buy-in from the population and also reaching out to marginalized groups.”

Early in the pandemic, many Asian countries imposed strict lockdown and travel rules that kept the virus largely at bay. As vaccines rolled out in force elsewhere, those low rates sometimes worked against them, giving some people the impression that getting the shot wasn't urgent.

But when the virulent delta variant began ripping through the region, cases rose, encouraging people to sign up.

Some countries, like Malaysia, made extra efforts to ensure that even the hardest-to-reach groups were offered the vaccine. It enlisted the Red Cross’s help to give shots to people living in the country illegally and other groups that may have feared showing up for a government-sponsored vaccination.

“We made the vaccine accessible to all, with no questions asked,” said Professor Sazaly Abu Bakar, director of the Tropical Infectious Diseases and Research Education Center.

As with Cambodia and Japan, Malaysia plodded along in its first three months, giving less than 5% of its 33 million people their first dose in that time, according to Our World in Data.

When cases surged, however, Malaysia bought more doses and established hundreds of vaccination centers, including mega hubs capable of providing up to 10,000 shots a day. The country now has 76% of its population fully vaccinated.

To date, about a dozen countries in the Asia-Pacific region have vaccinated more than 70% of their populations or are on the cusp of doing so, including Australia, China, Japan and Bhutan. In Singapore, 92% are fully vaccinated.

Some countries in Asia, however, have continued to struggle. India celebrated giving its billionth COVID-19 vaccine dose in October, but with a population of nearly 1.4 billion, that translates to a fully vaccinated rate of 29%. Indonesia started earlier than most but has also stumbled, largely due to the challenge of expanding its campaign across the thousands of islands that make up its archipelago.

Japan's vaccine program was notoriously slow — inching along while the world wondered if it would be able to hold the Summer Olympics. It didn't start until mid-February because it required additional clinical testing on Japanese people before using the vaccines — a move that was widely criticized as unnecessary. It was also initially hit with supply issues.

But then it turned a corner. Then-Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga brought in military medial staff to operate mass inoculation centers in Tokyo and Osaka and bent laws to allow dentists, paramedics and lab technicians to give shots alongside doctors and nurses.

The number of daily doses given rose to about 1.5 million in July, and the country is now at about 76% fully inoculated. A large part of Japan's success is due to the public's response, said Makoto Shimoaraiso, a senior official in charge of the country's COVID-19 response.

Many in Japan are skeptical in general about vaccines, but after seeing deaths soar around the world, it has not been an issue.

In fact, retiree Kiyoshi Goto is already clamoring for his next shot, as he looks warily at rising case in Europe.

“I want to get a booster shot as our antibody levels are going down,” the 75-year-old said.

In Phnom Penh, Nuth Nyra was just happy to get her first, saying she was afraid of COVID-19 before — but no more.

“I felt a little bit of pain when I got the shot,” the young girl said in a soft voice at a vaccination center on the outskirts of Cambodia's capital. “But I didn’t cry.”

Associated Press writers Kim Tong-hyung in Seoul, South Korea; Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo contributed to this report.

© Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.


78 Comments

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Good for Asia.

You wont find violent, anarchic anti-vaxxers at anywhere near the extent of many other nations, some of whom are now in deep trouble heading into a cold winter.

10 ( +23 / -13 )

Today Cambodia is 78% fully vaccinated — compared to 58% in the U.S

Which one is the developing country?

15 ( +30 / -15 )

Most started vaccinating relatively late due to complacency amid low infection rates, initial supply issues and other factors

'Other factors' include extensive disinformation campaigns conducted by fringe extremist groups aimed at an angry and alienated population comprised of anarchists and their ilk who seemingly welcome the further downfall of their democratic nation and its economy.

Hats off to Japanese people, and how they are now dealing with the pandemic, none of whom I am aware of actually believes wack things like Bill Gates has put tracking chips in the vaccines. But it could be some Japanese that I do not know are associated in some way with an outside person who actually believes crackpot theories pushed by Qanon etc. Fortunately no one in my family or circle of Japanese friends does. I am grateful to be in Japan where common sense seems to prevail and a high number of people have been vaccinated. And recognize that medicine for animals is best used on animals for its intended purpose.

12 ( +17 / -5 )

How surprising the article doesn't mention the fact Cambodia is using the only highly effective vaccine which has the added benefit of being perfectly safe.

and that Cambodia is getting all its vaccines through Covax which Japan is the largest donor. I wonder if Cambodia has a problem with Japan donating vaccines through Covax as some the posters on this website do? Japan saved Cambodia.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

the article doesn't mention the fact Cambodia is using the only highly effective vaccine 

I've read they've been using the Sinovac, Sinopharm, and AstraZeneca vaccines. And that they intend to switch for any booster vaccinations (i.e. if you had Sinovac initially, you get AstraZeneca for a booster). Which is the "only effective" one?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I would not recommend the Moderna vaccine. Several people I know had side effects, including my next bros in NY. We had the Pfizer shots.

-16 ( +4 / -20 )

I would not recommend the Moderna vaccine. Several people I know had side effects, including my next bros in NY. We had the Pfizer shots.

I know many people who had Moderna in Japan. They were all perfectly fine. Therefore I highly recommend it, along with the medical professionals.

14 ( +22 / -8 )

I would not recommend the Moderna vaccine. Several people I know had side effects, including my next bros in NY. We had the Pfizer shots.

Many of us in Japan had Moderna and have had no problems, including myself. Moderna also has one of the highest efficacy rates.

21 ( +25 / -4 )

and that Cambodia is getting all its vaccines through Covax which Japan is the largest donor.

You see what's happening all over the world but still think the 3 vaccines Japan has approved actually work? What is it? Willfully deluding yourself or have a financial interest in the Big Pharma concoctions?

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

zichiToday  05:45 pm JST

I would not recommend the Moderna vaccine. Several people I know had side effects, including my next bros in NY. We had the Pfizer shots.

I thought better of you Zichi. Some here could say the same thing about the Pfizer and others say they didn’t have any side effects they noticed.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

My brother in NY, a musician, had the Moderna vaccine. He did not want the vaccine but was required to be able to work the Tribeca Film Fest. He lost movement in the vaccinated arm for several weeks and was unable to play his guitar which he does for his living.

Another old person was in bed for 10 days after her vaccine. Another suffers from terrible allergy problems and can no longer eat the same foods as before. She was hospitalised.

There are other cases we personally know about.

We had Pfizer and had zero side effects.

Pukey2

Many of us in Japan had Moderna and have had no problems, 

Do you know everyone in Japan? You don't know me.

BTW I haven't driven a car since 1979.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

Luddite

zichiToday  05:45 pm JST

I would not recommend the Moderna vaccine. Several people I know had side effects, including my next bros in NY. We had the Pfizer shots.

I thought better of you Zichi. Some here could say the same thing about the Pfizer and others say they didn’t have any side effects they noticed.

So you think I should not post what I know happened to my family and friends. Everyone has to decide for themselves. I should not post that some people had side effects.

If people know something about the Pfizer vaccine, good let them post about it too.

Only when we have the full facts can we make the best decisions.

I already had to wait 18 months for the vaccination while my immune system grew stronger again after my cancer op. Excuse me if I am a bit nervous about the possible outcomes. I have already dealt with some very serious health problems and I do not want any new ones.

-12 ( +4 / -16 )

@Ingvar: Sinovac and AstraZeneca have by far the most widely used vaccines in Cambodia, yes, Sputnik is also approved for use but they were only supllied with a small amount. Cambodias government itself that they would source vaccines by all means necessary - In face Japan donated some of their domestically produced AZ to the country.

Sinovac has been given to those 5 and older. They have achieved a 79% vaccination rate thus far and life is returning to normal there. Fortunately they have not been exposed to anti-vax propaganda and/or have correctly chosen not to listen to it.

I had Moderna @zichi as did most of my colleagues. Yes - we all suffered side effects, nothing awful though 12-36 hours post jab and it came highly recommended by my doctor, who I consulted prior to my jabs whilst deciding between Pfizer through the ward office or Moderna arranged by my employer. Almost all the old and infirm that I know such as yourself, andincluding my own Mother seemed to suffer no side effects from Pfizer. The younger people did.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

You see what's happening all over the world but still think the 3 vaccines Japan has approved actually work? What is it? Willfully deluding yourself or have a financial interest in the Big Pharma concoctions?

Every single medical and scientific institution in the whole world also say they work and are very effective and safe, thinking your own personal opinion is enough to prove the world is wrong would be much more indicative of being deluded.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Good news!

They finally realized that vaccination is the only way back to normal!

6 ( +10 / -4 )

So you think I should not post what I know happened to my family and friends. 

I think it was the "not recommend" part that surprised some of us.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

zichiToday  06:09 pm JST

My brother in NY, a musician, had the Moderna vaccine. 

Just to clarify, that is your older bro in NY? Because:

zichiNov. 19  02:10 pm JST

Lived in Italy off and on for about three years. Youngest brother has been living there for thirty years. I have never eaten pizza with a knife and fork.

Pukey2Today  05:59 pm JST

Many of us in Japan had Moderna and have had no problems, including myself. Moderna also has one of the highest efficacy rates.

I heard the Moderna is a bit more effective than the Pfizer and that is why the side effects are a bit more extreme, but who knows, unless someone had both shots and experienced different side effects.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

I heard the Moderna is a bit more effective than the Pfizer and that is why the side effects are a bit more extreme,

Yeah, they are similar "vaccines", but the Moderna is given at a higher dose (3x higher?).

So if you just want to get a "vaccine" for travel or for keeping your job, then you should get the Pfizer. If you actually want a "vaccine" that offers more than a few months protection from symptoms, then get the Moderna, but you should expect more side effects...

Of course, if you are healthy you should avoid both, you don't need them...

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

My wife and I had Moderna and the side-effects were not exactly enjoyable (my wife worse than myself) but as it seems to be the most effective and longest lasting, I am glad we got it and look forward to my booster sometime between Feb and April.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I wonder if a while back European countries and America were writing articles about their vaccine rates being higher than Asia?

Nah, didn't think so. I don't know why vaccination rates seem like a competition here in Asia.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

The Europeans made a big deal of their rates compared to other countries early on, especially the UK. Wrong again Thomas.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

@Raw Beer, Yes - Nonsense.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

Every single medical and scientific institution in the whole world also say they work and are very effective and safe,

Every medical institution in the world not censored for telling the truth is busy embellishing the dangers and lack of efficacy of the Big Pharma concoctions. The latest but the poorest attempt was by Dr Fauci himself. Admitting fully vaccinated, previously healthy young people are succumbing to the virus.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Wait, the US is still stuck at 58%?! Didn't they claim like half a year ago about their victory against covid and high vaccination rate? I can't believe they are still stuck at that % after so many months. What is Biden even doing? You cannot blame Trump anymore for any of this. It's been a year already.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Meanwhile, testing remains at a minimum in Japan, and I understand first-hand why -- they make it near impossible. Places boast about it, then in fine print say, "Please do not come if you have a fever", or "doctor's referral required" (and doctor's office asks you not to come if you have a fever), tell you to wait at home, etc. It's absolutely ridiculous, and they are still far, far behind many nations in both testing and as such, in diagnosing and treating actual numbers of positive cases.

It's good that they finally got off their butts and starting vaccinating, once it was clear their reputation was on the line after domestic results at producing a vaccine failed and the Olympics might actually get canned, but still.

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

RegBilk

zichi

*My brother **in NY, a musician, had the Moderna vaccine. *

Just to clarify, that is your older bro in NY? Because:

DF

Just read the comment properly.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

SmithinJapan having 1 case or 1 million case will not change the fact that there are few people hospitalized in Japan. In addition to that, I don't know any country in Europe that have more test than Japan that has same number of hospitalized people.

Doesn't matter how many people are tested, as long few people are hospitalized and the number of recovering is higher, the test thing is irrelevant.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Thomas GoodtimeToday  07:50 pm JST

I wonder if a while back European countries and America were writing articles about their vaccine rates being higher than Asia?

Nah, didn't think so. I don't know why vaccination rates seem like a competition here in Asia.

The article is just here to explain how much things has being improved in Asia. Comparing numbers with Europe or US doesn't mean Asian are using this number as competition as you suggest. When we work with statistics we need to make comparisons in order to see if we improved or not.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

@fightho I got my flu shot but still don’t want covid shot doesn’t make anyone a antivaxer. People are selective about what they consider safe for them.

-8 ( +4 / -12 )

As many people are getting vaccines, the more hope we have that things will improve. Of course, vaccines itself will not cure people. So, we still need to wear our masks and wash our hands with soup often.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

I like seeing some people talk good about the shots. I hope it all works out in the end...if it ever ends. Best of luck to all of you.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The Europeans made a big deal of their rates compared to other countries early on, especially the UK. Wrong again Thomas.

@theresident

Pardon me, but I think he/she is correct here. I don't think Europe or America boasted about vaccination at all in comparison to other nations.

For some reason, Japan does. It's a little bit embarrassing

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Sinovac and AstraZeneca have by far the most widely used vaccines in Cambodia, yes, Sputnik is also approved for use but they were only supllied with a small amount. Cambodias government itself that they would source vaccines by all means necessary - In face Japan donated some of their domestically produced AZ to the country.

Firstly, it's good you acknowledge the fact THAT vaccine is the only safe and highly effective vaccine. The next step is telling everyone you know to demand the Japanese government put politics aside and allow it in Japan. Why not give us a choice? If you want to the take the Big Pharma concoctions every few months, I wish you well (god knows, you'll need luck). I'll pass.

Secondly, where do you get the info about what and how much of each vaccine they are using in Cambodia? The Chinese vaccines are pretty good. At least, very safe which I feel is very important for a disease which isn't very deadly, like coronavirus. However, it seems they are only a little more effective than the Big Pharma concoctions. That is what was reported by the government of Hungary and I haven't seen anything to contradict that. Though at that time the government of Hungary didn't know the Big Pharma concoctions became useless (at best) so quickly.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

For some reason, Japan does. It's a little bit embarrassing

Nope, that is not embarassing at all. Whoever who make statistics need to draw comparisons in order to have idea of how effectivity Asian countries are doing. If Europe is doing or not, that is not our problem.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Great news! Soon all of Asia will share the great success story of Singapore!

Oh, wait....

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

@Ingvar: At no point did I acknowledge Sputnik was the mist effective and safest vaccine out there.

Plenty of information to be found on which vaccinations are being used in Cambodia, and AZ is being used as a booster for those who had Sinovac the first time round.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Keep going forward, asians.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Anecdotal musings, by folks with not even a minimal understanding of vaccines or viruses. Citing completely bogus non-facts as critiques of Moderna, Pfizer or other vaccines in terms of efficacy.

Additional incorrect statements about Sputnik which is lacking in testing standards and if one looks at Russia, cases and deaths far exceed Japan's. Both countries have similar size populations. Moderna, Pfizer and Oxford are in the 90th percentile and superior to the others. Which is not to deny their effectiveness of the other vaccines, but their efficacy is in the 80th percentile.

Adverse reactions to the vaccines are limited and brief. Not long-lasting and there are no reported deaths.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

If Europe is doing or not, that is not our problem.

@mitsuo

And there we are. It IS our problem. We expect to journey off to Europe whenever we feel like it, but there is no reciprocation.

The old us and them adage is ruining our reputation worldwide and I don't like it. Let's be fair.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

we still need to wear our masks and wash our hands with soup often.

And come on, Mitsuo, have you ever been in a public toilet here? Most men dangle the tips of their fingers under the tap at most!

0 ( +7 / -7 )

And come on, Mitsuo, have you ever been in a public toilet here? Most men dangle the tips of their fingers under the tap at most!

@thomas

Hey!! Lol. We're not all like that lol!!

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

RobToday 06:03 pm JST

and that Cambodia is getting all its vaccines through Covax which Japan is the largest donor.

You see what's happening all over the world but still think the 3 vaccines Japan has approved actually work? What is it? Willfully deluding yourself or have a financial interest in the Big Pharma concoctions?

The problem is that people aren't seeing what is happening around the world. Sick of trying to warn people of the vaccine dangers and getting deleted by the moderator continually. About 38 times so far.

Let them get their shots. Many will find out later whether the got the placebo or real one. All drug companies when testing any drugs etc., include placebos.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

At no point did I acknowledge Sputnik was the mist effective and safest vaccine out there.Plenty of information to be found on which vaccinations are being used in Cambodia, and AZ is being used as a booster for those who had Sinovac the first time round.

I mentioned the fact Cambodia has long been using the ONLY safe and highly effective vaccine (Chinese vaccines = safe but not very effective. Big Pharma concoctions = dangerous and highly ineffective) but the article didn't mention it and then you went on a rant about how they are only using THAT vaccine a little.

By this point, with data from all over the world readily available, these facts can no longer be denied.

Could you provide a link about how much of what vaccines Cambodians are using?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

I applaud those Asian countries. Cambodia, Vietnam, Singapore, etc.

Japan must work harder to catch up to them.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

the sudden, massive uptick in healthy, young people having heart attacks

Fake news. But well disguised, so that only people who aren't complete and utter morons can see through it.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Of course, if you are healthy you should avoid both, you don't need them...

The same sort of upside down feeble nonsensical thinking that makes people believe that the earth is flat or that we are ruled by a secret race of lizard people. A David Icke-esque style psycological illness.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

zichiNov. 23  06:09 pm JST

We had Pfizer and had zero side effects.

Didn't the vaccinations just start to be administered worldwide less than 12 months ago?

And didn't Japan just start their vaccination program less than 6 months ago?

zichiNov. 23  06:19 pm JST

I already had to wait 18 months for the vaccination

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

While your experience is real, but with the amount of vaccines put into arms world wide, anecdotal cases of side effects simply don't matter much as a deterrent to getting the shot by this phase of the game. It is just part of variance.

I've heard fair share of varying reactions from the big 3, and they all vary. Even myself had differing reaction to the first and second shot, with mild to severe fatigue reaction but none the less, by now it's nothing more than anecdotal.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Didn't the vaccinations just start to be administered worldwide less than 12 months ago?

A scientist I was listening to explained that no vaccine side effects have ever been seen after 40-some days. This is why they did 6-week trials.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Thomas GoodtimeNov. 23  10:31 pm JST

> And come on, Mitsuo, have you ever been in a public toilet here? Most men dangle the tips of their fingers under the tap at most!

That’s just before they rin their fingers through their hair for ten minutes.

The reason Japanese people think washing your hands doesn’t involve soap and think a few seconds of dangling fingertips is appropriate because of the sinks in the backs of toilets at homes. Japanese people are taught that dangling their fingers under the tap in that sink is washing your hands.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Australia is now at 91.7% single dose and 85.5% of population double vaccinated. On December 10, (16 days) Australia will achieve 90% according to data. Let's go Japan hurry up and get it done and scrap your home quarantine please.

https://covidlive.com.au/

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I would not recommend the Moderna vaccine. Several people I know had side effects, including my next bros in NY. We had the Pfizer shots.

Your "side effect" is called an immune response and it's what is supposed to happen as a person's body reacts to the vaccine and then produces antibodies that protect them from the virus that they are being vaccinated against.

ALL of the vaccines produce an immune response in ALL recipients. That's the point of a vaccine. Ask Edward Jenner. However your immune response may have been so mild that you didn't feel it, while other people have more of a reaction. That is to do with you, not the brand of vaccine that you have received.

The people who experience a more severe immune response are likely the people who would be more seriously sick if they were unvaccinated and caught the virus.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Of course, if you are healthy you should avoid both, you don't need them...

You're saying the healthy are immune to covid infection?

They're not.

And if they want to remain healthy they must continually observe anti infection measures.

The best one is getting vaccinated.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

and that Cambodia is getting all its vaccines through Covax which Japan is the largest donor.

Wrong! Both the US and Germany contribute more.

COVAX - Wikipedia

Nice try though

2 ( +6 / -4 )

ian

You're saying the healthy are immune to covid infection?

They're not.

Neither are the vaxxed (with the currently available mRNA shots). So what is the point.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

PTownsend

'Other factors' include extensive disinformation campaigns conducted by fringe extremist groups aimed at an angry and alienated population comprised of anarchists and their ilk who seemingly welcome the further downfall of their democratic nation and its economy.

Wow, you are being critical of CNN now? That is a first.

I say it is sad that open debate about this virus and vaccination issue is now de facto impossible, because it has become so radically politicized.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

virusrex

Every single medical and scientific institution in the whole world also say

I am quite sure you do not every single medical and scientific institution in the whole world, so can we do without the posturing?

Fact is, this is a new area with lots of hypothesis and research going on.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The reason Japanese people think washing your hands doesn’t involve soap and think a few seconds of dangling fingertips is appropriate because of the sinks in the backs of toilets at homes. Japanese people are taught that dangling their fingers under the tap in that sink is washing your hands.

Not in my family, but you're right about that washing hands point. It's so dirty.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Neither are the vaxxed (with the currently available mRNA shots). So what is the point.

Rubbish

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

N. KnightToday  08:14 am JST

Your "side effect" is called an immune response and it's what is supposed to happen as a person's body reacts to the vaccine and then produces antibodies that protect them from the virus that they are being vaccinated against. 

ALL of the vaccines produce an immune response in ALL recipients. That's the point of a vaccine. Ask Edward Jenner. However your immune response may have been so mild that you didn't feel it, while other people have more of a reaction. That is to do with you, not the brand of vaccine that you have received.

The people who experience a more severe immune response are likely the people who would be more seriously sick if they were unvaccinated and caught the virus.

Any peer-reviewed studies?

You're making the claim. The burden of proof is on you to back this up otherwise your opinion is meaningless uninformed nonsense.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

So you think I should not post what I know happened to my family and friends. Everyone has to decide for themselves. I should not post that some people had side effects.

Post your experiences, yes; but telling people not to have the Moderna is irresponsible.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

ian

You're saying the healthy are immune to covid infection?

They're not.

Reality check: The vaccinated are not "immune to covid infection" either. Not even the authorities, pharma companies and media who are pushing the vaccination are claiming that anymore. The best claim currently is that the vaccinations reduce hospitalizations.

But hardly and healthe people are hospitalized anyway.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

N. Knight

Your "side effect" is called an immune response and it's what is supposed to happen as a person's body reacts to the vaccine and then produces antibodies that protect them from the virus that they are being vaccinated against.

No. Myocarditis, Pericarditis, blood clots and strokes are not "supposed to happen". They are what fills the VAERS and EUDRA registers. Expected side effects like a sore arm and headache are not registered there.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

According to the New York Times, 1 in 6,800 people in Japan have died from the coronavirus since the start of the pandemic, while in the United States, the corresponding figure is 1 in 428. Thanks a lot, Trump.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

On the block where we live, four people have died from the pandemic, all of them younger than me. When I finally got my shots, it was like a weight being lifted off my shoulders.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Is the India vaccination rate miscalculated?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The singular question is why are the vaccinated so afraid of the unvaccinated if the vaccine really works. There is no getting around this question. Game over.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

The singular question is why are the vaccinated so afraid of the unvaccinated if the vaccine really works.

Maybe because we live in the real world and not some binary fantasyland where the virus either works or doesn't.

Some people were stupid enough to assume that vaccines would work 100%, and then got angry and blamed "them" for daring to make a medicine that only protects most of us most of the time, instead of all of the time.

Children.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

In reality, this reigns true below, despite the positive spin about Cambodia:

The lockdowns have failed to stop the Covid-19 virus.

The universal masking regime have failed to stop the Covid-19 virus.

The millions and millions of societal restrictions and business closures failed to stop the Covid-19 virus.

And now it’s become pretty clear that the highly-touted “miracle” mRNA and DNA virus shots are failing to stop the Covid-19 virus.

Instead of accepting this reality, world governments are doubling, tripling, and quadrupling down on the madness.

Despite incredibly high compliance rates, with an estimated 7.5+ billion COVID shots delivered in arms, the mRNA and viral DNA gene therapy “cure” has in no way lived up to its admittedly impossible-to-achieve standards.

And many still don't get it.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

And many still don't get it.

Some of you don't get it alright.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

No. Myocarditis, Pericarditis, blood clots and strokes are not "supposed to happen". They are what fills the VAERS and EUDRA registers. Expected side effects like a sore arm and headache are not registered there.

Yes they are, mild and uninportat expected side effects are also included, by the way all of the importants side effects you mention are much more frequently presented in people infected by COVID than those receiving any of the approved vaccines.

The singular question is why are the vaccinated so afraid of the unvaccinated if the vaccine really works. There is no getting around this question. Game over.

That has been repeatedly answered, people are not by default self centered monsters that only care about themselves as the antivaxxers tend to think. so even if someone is well protected this person is still very much interested in lowering the risk for everybody else by limiting the extra dangers of unvaccinated people trying to get the same treatment as vaccinated ones.

Despite incredibly high compliance rates, with an estimated 7.5+ billion COVID shots delivered in arms, the mRNA and viral DNA gene therapy “cure” has in no way lived up to its admittedly impossible-to-achieve standards.

That is the thing, the "impossible-to-achieve standards" exist only in the antivaxxer propaganda. For the rest of the world and specially the experts on control of infectious diseases the true purpose of the vaccines has always been protecting from the most dangerous complications as much people as possible, and reduce the spreading of the disease even if not stopping it completely (the same thing that other vaccines are aimed to).

And this has been done very well, as the evidence from all over the world proves, with complications and deaths being predominantly in unvaccinated people, even with a variant against which the vaccine was not even designed for.

The same applies for all the other measures, none are perfect but the better they are implemented the safer the population is from the pandemic.

Antiscientific people are terribly frustrated by this and that is why they try to misrepresent the situation, present very effective meausres as useless just because they can't be absolutely perfect, and trying to hide the fact that they offer nothing better to replace them. Just letting a lot of people die unnecessarily and call it a "solution".

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

When Covid first came on the scene, it was less transmissible than it is today, with the Delta variant. The virus evolved, in people who were capable of coming down with the disease. Although most people are today vaccinated, the virus has the potential to continue evolving, in ways that may make it even more deadly. If it evolves, it will most likely evolve in people who are capable of getting sick, which in more than 90% of cases, means the unvaccinated.

Thus, getting vaccinated helps to protect against future deadly variants, as well as helping to protect those who are vaccinated but have underlying health concerns that make them more susceptible, such as those fighting cancer, and people who have had transplants, and who are thus taking drugs to suppress their immune systems.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

1glenn

According to the New York Times, 1 in 6,800 people in Japan have died from the coronavirus since the start of the pandemic, while in the United States, the corresponding figure is 1 in 428. Thanks a lot, Trump.

Pretty ironic to lambast Trump while at the same time insisting that everybody gets Trumps "operation warp speed" experimental mRNA shots, of which Trump is a great supporter. Love this split reality.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

That is the thing, the "impossible-to-achieve standards" exist only in the antivaxxer propaganda. For the rest of the world and specially the experts on control of infectious diseases the true purpose of the vaccines has always been protecting from the most dangerous complications as much people as possible, and reduce the spreading of the disease even if not stopping it completely (the same thing that other vaccines are aimed to).

That is not true. Most vaccines are immunizing, i.e. if you have the measles shot you are not going to get measles. Which was also the original claim for the experimental mRNA shots, which only classify as "vaccines" because of the watered-down new vaccine definition that the CDC uses now. According to the traditional definition, they are not vaccines.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

No. Myocarditis, Pericarditis, blood clots and strokes are not "supposed to happen". They are what fills the VAERS and EUDRA registers. Expected side effects like a sore arm and headache are not registered there.

Yes they are, mild and uninportat expected side effects are also included, by the way all of the importants side effects you mention are much more frequently presented in people infected by COVID than those receiving any of the approved vaccines.

Are you suggesting that if you complain to your doctor that you got a sore arm from the vaccine, he/she will go through the time and trouble to submit it to VAERS? I think not? Also, when you search the database, you can specify the adverse effects, and the serious effects like myocarditis are off the charts...

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Are you suggesting that if you complain to your doctor that you got a sore arm from the vaccine, he/she will go through the time and trouble to submit it to VAERS? I think not?

Unlike many here, I actually looked through VAERS results. "No side effects" has been listed as a side effect literally thousands of times. As have "stomach x-rays", as though if you get the vaccine x-ray machine spontaneously appear in front of your abdomen. And no, it's not a result of stomach ache - that's also listed.

You don't know what you're talking about.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

That is not true. Most vaccines are immunizing, i.e. if you have the measles shot you are not going to get measles

That is false, most people are never involved in outbreaks precisely because herd immunity is reached, but in populations with low levels of immunity people do get measles even after vaccination, and more than that get the infection (without the disease) as evidenced by an increase of immunoglobulins after exposure. The same happens with polio vaccines and many others. What you are confused about is that people do not get tested for infection and only for disease for other pathogens, but for COVID testing even for infection is necessary because of the importance of asymptomatic carriers.

And if all the professionals that produce, examine, and distribute vaccines for public health purposes say they are vaccines then the personal, baseless opinion of some nameless people on the internet is irrelevant in comparison.

Are you suggesting that if you complain to your doctor that you got a sore arm from the vaccine, he/she will go through the time and trouble to submit it to VAERS?

Yes, professionals do that without much problem, the same as with any other vaccine, if a patient took the time to go to the doctor to complain then the doctor can take a tiny fraction of that time to report it, you would know that if you had ever checked the system and see the kind of complains that are included.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Pretty ironic to lambast Trump while at the same time insisting that everybody gets Trumps "operation warp speed" experimental mRNA shots, of which Trump is a great supporter. Love this split reality.

Remember the "Trump vaccine" rhetoric? Lol, leftists are a riot.

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