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Anger as MH370 report offers no new clues to aviation's greatest mystery

14 Comments
By M. Jegathesan

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After years of fruitless searching in the world's most enduring aviation mystery,

Really and here all along I thought it was the disappearance of Amelia Earhart that was the world's most enduring mystery.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Pretty obvious it was the pilot, who zigzagged over national borders to avoid radar detection shortly after taking off and dipping his wings over his hometown. The recovered parts also show evidence of a deliberate dive into the ocean.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

The recovered parts also show evidence of a deliberate dive into the ocean.

Then you know a hell of a lot more than the people who actually did the investigation! Only 3 parts were found, and there is nothing concrete to support any theory.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Then you know a hell of a lot more than the people who actually did the investigation! Only 3 parts were found, and there is nothing concrete to support any theory.

The report is for the most part technical, and it tries to answer the question of what happened using hard science.

The thing is, since there isn't enough information to make a deliberation like that, they don't.

But the idea that the responsible was the pilot, and that it was deliberate is the most accepted theory in the aviation industry.

The facts are:

The plane was in route, but then took a turn exactly in the same place where another airway collided, and the plane started to move on that new airway. At almost the same time that there was the change in airway, the plane lost primary communication with air control, and stopped to broadcast it's primary position, making it "invisible" in commercial radar, but still visible in military radar, but since the plane was a commercial air plane using a common airway, the military probably overlooked this. The plane continued to broadcast hourly status requests from Inmarsat until about the time the plane was supposed to run out of fuel. Because of the communications from Inmarsat, and triangulation on the location of these communications, it is believed that the plane had to go down around the Southern Indian Ocean. In 2016, a leaked American document stated that a route on the pilot's home flight simulator closely matching the projected flight over the Indian Ocean was found during the FBI analysis of the hard drive of the computer used for the flight simulator.

So yeah, we cannot 100% conclude that it was intentional, or that the pilot was responsible... but there is very strong evidence that shows this as the most plausible cause.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The 400 pages could be summarised as, 'We Don't Know'. This report is just full of best guesses, assumptions, and some known technical facts that have little bearing on what really happened.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Total snow job on this one. Malaysia are covering up pilot suicide at worst, a terrorist attack at best.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The plane was not crashed nor did it explode. If this were so, there would have been pieces of it scattered all over the Indian ocean. Planes are heavily insulated and the insulation is buoyant. This means it would have been easily detected as the debris would have covered a large area. This points to the plane being landed on the ocean and sinking although, unless the water was very calm the plane would have still broken up. Of course, another theory is, the plane did not crash at all. It dropped off radar in Vietnamese airspace. It is possible it was flown to a remote landing strip on the coast of Vietnam. It's definitely one of the world'd great aviation mysteries. I hope they can find some evidence in the future for the sake of the families of those who are missing.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Really and here all along I thought it was the disappearance of Amelia Earhart that was the world's most enduring mystery. it still is enduring but compared to a large passenger jet with 239 people vanishing and with the technology available today you have to wonder how it hasn't been found yet.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Don't forget Glenn Miller. Also an aviation mystery.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's pointless to speculate when there is no data, it can hardly be any investigator's fault

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Yubaru

Then you know a hell of a lot more than the people who actually did the investigation!

Calm down. My knowledge largely stems to the conclusion of an independent -- independent - panel of aviation investigative and safety experts, rather than the "official" government version. And they know "a hell of a lot more" about this than you do.

https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/incidents/expert-say-theyre-confident-they-know-what-happened-to-flight-mh370/news-story/e77e332d1acf1cda5e234d8f80b32730

Only 3 parts were found, and there is nothing concrete to support any theory.

Wrong. Experts - independent experts - have noted the absence of marks or damage indicating an explosion and signs that the flaps were not engaged, strongly indicating a deliberate dive into the sea.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Jefflee...interesting that you can read how I am thinking and my emotional state as well over a few words. Even my wife of over 30 years can't do that.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It is possible it was flown to a remote landing strip on the coast of Vietnam

Do you know any shady landing strips where a Boeing777 can land? Undetected??

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It is possible it was flown to a remote landing strip on the coast of Vietnam

A remote 4000m landing strip off the coast of Vietnam.

Yeah, there must be dozens of them. I’m sure no one thought to look there

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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