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At least 65 dead at pro-Morsi Cairo rallies

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Wow! Looks like the Egyptian army really wants to do away with the Muslim Brotherhood! Not too sure what is going on but all of this violence can not be good for that country. Hey, lets go check out the pyramids, oh wait, the Egyptians are murdering each other left and right, kind of a civil war in the making?? Very scary and sad, me thinks.

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Wtf happens at these protests that someone always dies. It really doesn't make much. If a peaceful protest turns violent it must do that one dumbass that ruins it for everyone else.

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What Happened to All the Islamic fundamentalists? Keep accusing the west... May be they must read Quran 24hrs and accuse other religions...

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Truly pitiful what western countries have done to aid these despicable terrorists in having their so-called "arab spring".

Does anyone deny that these places are all worse off than when they were under Ghadaffi, Mubarak and Hussein?

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The pro-Morsi people are in the minority. Why should they get their way? Shouldn't the majority rule?

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I remember watching the original anti-Mubaraka protests early January 2011 when I started working at a startup in LA. I said to myself "Stupid Egyptians..." over and over knowing full well that this would happen/ Why? Egyptians (like all Arabs) have no vision. They thought they would implement democracy today that they would be better than America the next. Yes, there were protesters at the Mubarak protests who thought Egypt would really be better than America thanks to democracy.

Big mistake Obama and Co did. Forcing democracy on the Arabs is like putting a gorilla from the jungles of Africa in a tuxedo and inviting him over to the Queens ball in London and expecting him to fit right in. What works for John Smith in New Brunswick, Maine, will not work for Achmed in Alexandria behind the camel. What works for Olga Guttenheim in Dusseldorf, Germany, will not work for Amira I never had a life outside the kitchen.

I can say this folks with absolute certainty because I grew up with such a people. In fact, my uncle, Hossam El Gheriany, was the then constitutional judge of Egypt when the MB was drafting their constituion.

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metto81@so you are blaming Obama and the west for the sad fact that Egyptians are culturally incapable of comprehending, let alone implementing, any form of functional government other than military-backed dictatorships? Personally I'm in favor of reincarnating Rameses the 2nd and whipping everyone back into line by making them lug and tote enormous sandstone blocks until they croak of starvation and/or mistreatment.

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"Big mistake Obama and Co did. Forcing democracy on the Arabs is like putting a gorilla from the jungles of Africa in a tuxedo and inviting him over to the Queens ball in London and expecting him to fit right in. What works for John Smith in New Brunswick, Maine, will not work for Achmed in Alexandria behind the camel."

Not only is this comment award winningly wrong from the outset, it would seem to have quite racist undertones....

This situation is going from bad to worse. A confrontation with the fundies will end in more carnage, it's looking (hindsight applied) that the army acted unwisely, despite the will of the people to oust the Brotherhood.

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hiding out: Does anyone deny that these places are all worse off than when they were under Ghadaffi, Mubarak and Hussein?

Democracy isn't a switch. It takes a long time to take hold, and during that time there are hundreds if not thousands of things that can go wrong and derail the entire process. The changes from the top on down are extraordinary and people and government just don't change overnight. A lot of it is taken on faith during the hard times, but we all know that if you reach the point you need to be then you will be better off over time.

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Saying all that SuperLib, and I don't necessarily disagree, wouldn't the citizens of those countries have been better off if the West had just stayed out of their lives and left "democracy" to develop organically? Arming terrorists in order to overthrow (relatively benign by historical standards) dictators and "speed up the process" would seem akin to trying to throw a switch. I said at the time that the "arab spring" was a joke, and sure enough ....

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hidingout: wouldn't the citizens of those countries have been better off if the West had just stayed out of their lives and left "democracy" to develop organically?

Like Syria?

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Like Syria?

Are you suggesting that outside powers haven't been meddling in the affairs of Syria? Cause that obviously is not the case.

We never heard peep one about Assad until the arab spring virus (cooked up, fomented and supported by the West) spread to Syria .... and now he's suddenly the baddest man on the planet. I don't think he's a humanitarian or anything, but he's certainly better for stability in the region than the gong show that's bound to replace him if his government falls. Fortunately it looks like he's getting the upper hand.

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