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Banned from school, Afghan girls turn to madrassas

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39 Comments
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It's medieval. What gives the Taliban the right to believe they can destroy the potential and limit the minds of perfectly good human beings with limited, rote-learning education about limited subjects just to try to force-fit them into a backwards idea of how society should be? No place should be like that.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

Religion untamed by reason, science and basic decency gives you this.

Never give it a foothold in government.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Biased and one-sided report as always.

-17 ( +2 / -19 )

Why would anyone voluntarily be a member of a religion that forces them to remain uneducated? Afghan women should get on a bus and put their country and Islam in their rearview mirror.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Despite all those current obstacles due to the harsh and religiously hardliner terrorist regime there, they will find a way out sooner or later, because always finally intelligence prevails over violence. I am convinced of that. Many centuries ago, the Arab and Persian countries had even much more knowledge of science, art or literature than other parts of the world. Not only in China, India, Ancient Greek or Roman Empire, no, also there a lot of discoveries were made and important scientific research results achieved. And at those former times there also wasn’t so much more available , for both genders btw, than only a few handwritten Quran exemplars or Madrassas for studying and basic education.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Everyone's dreams are lost," she said.

This is one of the saddest things about it all. Destroying young people's lives before they really even get started.

I am ever grateful that I won the lottery in being born where I was, and living where I am today.

I wish the kids here would get this!

6 ( +7 / -1 )

My grandfather, who came from a poor family, worked to support his family during his childhood and could not afford to go to school so he had no option but to complete his primary education in a madrassa where he was taught basic maths among other subjects.

He was not a Muslim but madrassas in those days (the 1930s) admitted financially disadvantaged kids who would otherwise have fallen through the cracks and imparted them a much needed basic education, without their religion being an issue.

He went on to do his PhD from the US and also became a Fulbright scholar but he remained grateful that he was able to complete his primary education inspite of his circumstances.

Madrassas have existed in South Asia for thousands of years, however their radicalisation and the fact that they are used to propagate a radical version of religion to children is a relatively recent phenomenon, which can be traced back to the politicization of Islam initiated by General Zia-ul-Haq.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Tell me again how (any) religion is a good thing.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Practically speaking, you are removing half of the high IQ people from your system. In the modern IQ driven economy, that is a recipe for disaster. And you'll be stuck in the middle ages forever.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

And you'll be stuck in the middle ages forever

I think that’s the plan.

As far as I can see, in terms of progress since the ‘revelation’, the Taliban enjoy assault weapons and Toyota trucks. I can imagine they enjoy online porn too if they can get it.

Can’t think of much else.

Butane gas lighters for smoking drugs?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The young women and girls had many hopes now stolen by the unelected Talitrash.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Biased and one-sided report as always.

Your chance to educate us about how denying women and girls (or anyone) education is in fact a good thing, Fahad Parvez Mahdi.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Is that picture above is the bottom line of a human right to a basic education.

If Faith the complete trust or confidence in someone or something, and proposedly any religious

Then.

The values of Love, Compassion, Kindness, Truth, Wisdom, Service and Forgiveness are just meaningless words.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nothing that a good Brain Washing won't fix.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is heartbreaking. The US was in Afghanistan for over 20 years and they did nothing for the people. At the end they left them high and dry.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Madrassas aren't going to earn you a good-paying job (except maybe only at other madrassas, lol)

It's just like Sunday school - it's a supplement at best. Not your main education

"Now that there are smartphones and the internet... schools are not the only way to get an education," she added.

She's right - online courses and training are growing

You can even earn your diploma online now

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Religion untamed by reason, science and basic decency gives you this.

Reason and science untamed by religion produce Communism and Nazism.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

First they banned women from universities, then from high school, now they even banned music and closed music schools.

All in the name of religious insanity.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Like it or not, Afghan society will probably still be around in 200+ years, long after our own modern secular societies have either collapsed or become unrecognisable. Religion might be harsh on the individual, but it's beneficial for the survival of the group.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

If the Talitrash is the future, there is no future.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I thought there was a war to change this. I guess wars are a waste of time. Just stick to taking care of your own country next time.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

What a beastly regime. They repulse me and should not have been allowed to retake the country and treat the people this way.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

That is the Afghan education system for women, very normal in Muslim countries

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

That is the Afghan education system for women, very normal in Muslim countries

Depends on the country. Muslim-majority countries tend to have a poor record on women’s rights but this extreme is not ‘very normal’

Bottom line - keep religion out of politics and education unless it’s teaching about religions.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I thought there was a war to change this. I guess wars are a waste of time. Just stick to taking care of your own country next time.

Says the guy commenting on a war between two other countries nowhere near him.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

This is heartbreaking. The US was in Afghanistan for over 20 years and they did nothing for the people. At the end they left them high and dry.

And did you support our mission there through all administrations? If not, this is rank hypocrisy isn't it? Societies as a whole have to want freedom in order to get it. Afghanistan as a whole wanted the Taliban.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Taiwan,the Afghanistan did nothing to really help themselves,but corruption,

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

the Afghanistan did nothing to really help themselves,but corruption,

Their country was invaded. They had no choice in the matter. It's not like they invited the invaders in.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Anonymous

Reason and science untamed by religion produce Communism and Nazism.

And yet the Nazis were mostly Christians.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"Efforts need to be taken so that the Islamic world is not left behind... letting go of modern education is like betraying the nation."

Afghans need to have a personal Jihad against preventing everyone of their countrymen and women from getting the best possible education so they can pull Afghanistan up from being one of the poorest nations on Earth to one where everyone has hope and capabilities to make life better for the next generation.

The old men need to go.

The future is for the young.

Blocking them from learning the latest technology, medicine and ways to raise food in the most effective ways is only harming Afghanistan. The level of ignorance shown by the current leaders are too ignorant to be left in charge of their own homes, much less a village, city, province, or country.

Learning religion is fine. It doesn't preclude learning other topics too.

BTW, Jihad means "struggle". There are personal struggles for all of us. If I were a woman/girl living in Afghanistan, I'd have a personal jihad to get educated.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Their country was invaded. They had no choice in the matter. It's not like they invited the invaders in.

If you are referring to the Taliban, my understanding is they are at least partly native Afghans. If you are referring to the US, I'm not sure what to make of the suggestion that the US would somehow eliminate corruption. We didn't exercise that level of control and you would have complained if we did.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Those poor schoolgirls, imagine being forced to wear those anti-social face covers, year after year. It wouldn't happen in Japan.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Says the guy commenting on a war between two other countries nowhere near him.

That’s why I made the statement. I’m sorry if I upset you, but there was a war and nothing changed.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Knowledge to compete the world can only come through educational institutes, not from religious training centers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The lives of the above are dependent on a the extremises that forces a require toan enforcement of religious further.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Religion might be harsh on the individual, but it's beneficial for the survival of the group.

How'd that work out for Japan's 200-year isolation for their worship of the Emperor and the Shogunate?

That is the Afghan education system for women, very normal in Muslim countries

Afghanistan is the only Muslim country that bans women education

Even Saudi Arabia and Iran allows women education

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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