U.S. National security adviser John Bolton, attends a conference of more than 50 nations that largely support Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido in Lima, Peru, Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019. Bolton says the U.S. will target anybody at home or abroad who supports the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro with stiff financial sanctions. Bolton spoke a day after the Trump administration announced a new round of sweeping measures aimed at pressuring Maduro from office. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
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Bolton says U.S. ready to negotiate post-Brexit trade pact

40 Comments

The United States is ready to negotiate a post-Brexit trade deal with the UK "in pieces" to help speed the process as Britain prepares to leave the European Union on Oct 31, National Security Adviser John Bolton said Monday.

Bolton told reporters after meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson in London that a piecemeal approach to trade negotiations was "not unprecedented" and talks between the U.S. and the UK could start with areas where the two sides are likely to agree.

"I think here we see the importance and urgency of doing as much as we can agree on as rapidly as possible," he said.

Johnson's office said the prime minister and U.S. President Donald Trump's adviser "spoke about Brexit and a range of other issues - including Iran, Hong Kong and 5G" network security.

Bolton suggested that discussing issues such as U.S. sanctions on Iran and a ban of Chinese tech giant Huawei could wait until after Brexit.

British newspapers reported in May that the UK National Security Council, which meets in private, had agreed to let Huawei participate in some aspects of Britain's new 5G wireless communications network.

The United States has been lobbying Britain and other allies to exclude Huawei from their 5G networks, insisting that the Chinese government could force the tech company to give it backdoor access to data.

But the British government has insisted no decision has been made about the use of Huawei's equipment in the UK.

Bolton said it was an honor for him to meet with Johnson.

"We have a strong commitment to deepening the U.S.-UK Special Relationship and working together to address global security issues," Bolton said in a tweet.

© Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

40 Comments

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The Trump Administration is ready and waiting to help make the UK great again. Go Brexit!

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

The UK will be much better off after Brexit.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Perhaps m'learned colleagues could explain how endangering the GFA will make the UK great again?

How will Scottish independence and the 6 counties being reunited with Ireland benefit the UK? I mean, I'm all in favor of it, but I don't think it will go down well with staunch unionists?

I can't see the DUP being very happy about it, especially with all the chatter about Sinn Fein doing the unthinkable and taking their seats in Westminster.

And the anniversary of Partition is looming, which probably won't be understood nor appreciated in modern Britain. It certainly will fire up some of the boys who see Mary Lou and the moderate Republicans as sell-outs. As her predecessor once said "they haven't gone away, you know".

The instability and volatility could lead to no small amount of chaos. And Brexit could be the spark, unfortunately.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@toasted

Just because you are wishing these things to happen, doesn't mean they will.

6 counties will stay with the UK. 2 of them voted leave, remember?

Scotland won't become independent. 40% of SNP members want to leave the EU, remember?

The GFA will be unaffected as it has been said numerous times by the leader of Ireland and the UK, remember?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

The GFA will be unaffected as it has been said numerous times by the leader of Ireland and the UK, remember?

Boris Johnson's word is worth nothing. His chief characteristic as a politician and a human is that he's a shameless liar and backstabber. He campaigned on a platform of waffle, scolding anyone to tried to press him on details for being too pessimistic. He stated that the chances of no-deal are "a million to one", then within hours of becoming Prime Minister installed a no-deal cabinet and has been looking at ways to make it a possibility through any means available, no matter how undemocratic or unconstitutional.

And no-deal is a direct threat to the GFA. So much for the leader of the UK.

The leader of Ireland, on the other hand, has said this about Brexit: "To me, Brexit is a threat to the Good Friday agreement simply because it threatens to drive a wedge between Britain and Ireland, between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and potentially between the two communities in Northern Ireland. And that’s why we must do all that we can to make sure that those wedges, that that risk, does not become reality."

How in your head do you reconcile your words, that the leader of Ireland has said numerous times that the GFA will be unaffected, with the leaders own words, "To me, Brexit is a threat to the Good Friday agreement".

For Christ's sake, he said that at a GFA 20th anniversary event in Washington.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Wipeout

You said pretty much the same thing last week. I posted two links in response, which answer the question of the GFA.

I'm not going to bother posting them again because you won't look at them, you'll whine again and then change topic. If you are being genuine, go back and have a look at them

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

You'll change the topic.

It's your topic, which I'll quote: "The GFA will be unaffected as it has been said numerous times by the leader of Ireland and the UK"

That's completely incompatible with Varadkar's words. He said the opposite.

Are you suggesting that Varadkar didn't explicitly state his belief that Brexit is a threat to the Good Friday Agreement?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

And what I have said is that the UK and Ireland have both said they will uphold the GFA come what may.

Varadkar said a couple of days ago now, that he will meet Johnson but will absolutely not renegotiate the backstop.

Perhaps you haven't understood this concept yet. The backstop is there to protect the Good Friday Agreement. Removing it is equivalent to creating a hard border, and a hard border is a threat to the Good Friday Agreement.

That problem doesn't just wash away when Johnson makes some vaguely reassuring noises about the GFA. Johnson is untrustworthy and uninterested in detail, presumably from an inability to understand it.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Besides the fact that Ireland, the EU and the UK have categorically stated that they will not create a hard border.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/taoiseach-insists-there-will-be-no-hard-border-despite-eu-statement-1.3767158

https://twitter.com/nick_gutteridge/status/1110130145514438656

Can you tell me....apart from the phantom hard border argument, what other parts of the GFA are you afraid will be repealed?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Can you tell me....apart from the phantom hard border argument, what other parts of the GFA are you afraid will be repealed?

No it's not a phantom argument when it's central to the stance of the EU on the backstop, and to the agreement it spent two years negotiating with Britain.

No-deal is just a way to duck all of this.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Who will construct this hard border?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Given the already very low tariffs between the US and the EU it’s hard to see how this will compensate for the increased cost of trading with our nearest neighbours. I suppose it could open the doors to hormone injected beef, chlorine washed chicken and GM crops. Yum! lower food standards, just what we’ve always wanted.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Who will construct this hard border?

So it's just going to be left open then. That's what you're saying, isn't it?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Just because you are wishing these things to happen, doesn't mean they will.

Just because unionists are wishing to maintain the status quo but leave the EU, doesn't mean things will stay the same in Scotland and Ireland.

6 counties will stay with the UK. 2 of them voted leave, remember?

If the make up of the EU can be changed in just a few short years, the same goes for the UK.

The GFA will be unaffected as it has been said numerous times by the leader of Ireland and the UK, remember?

He's warned that “There is no Withdrawal Agreement without a backstop and there is no implementation period without a Withdrawal Agreement.”

If there is no backstop, there is a danger of the British border being fortified again, which nobody wants to see.

You got your Brexit, or would have, if the DUP and other hardliners hadn't stalled. Now it's time for others to get their independence. To "take back" their countries, to use a familiar phrase.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

So it's just going to be left open then. That's what you're saying, isn't it?

I'm caliming there isn't going to be a hard border. You are. So, I ask again. Who will construct it? If you are so sure there'll be one, who will build it?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

You got your Brexit, or would have, if the DUP and other hardliners hadn't stalled.

You got your Brexit? You mean May's surrender treaty which included continued membership of the Single Market and Customs Union, and then continued FoM. All of this with added "You can't make your own free trade agreements and you'll continue paying vast amount of money into the EU budget"? Yeah, no thanks. That wasn't Brexit in any sense. It was comfy Remain.

Now it's time for others to get their independence.

You need to stop being subversive. You have got to start respecting the wishes of people who have their own freedom of choice. Northern Ireland does not show any majority towards joining the Republic.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Irish reunification is going to happen. Partition wasn't meant to last.

There is absolutely nothing "subversive" about that.

What are you going to do when the people of Northern Ireland don't want it. Are you going to undermine them? That's pretty subversive.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

What are you going to do when the people of Northern Ireland don't want it. Are you going to undermine them? That's pretty subversive.

And that's pretty disingenous of you.

Nothing subversive about aspiring to a United Ireland. Post-Brexit, this is likely to become a reality.

Supporting the unification of Ireland is nothing sinister. Please don't conclude that it is.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

A united Ireland would be good and solve so many issues. Like the Irish the people of Northern Ireland would still be free to go to mainland UK, free to live and works there, just as for many decades.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'm caliming there isn't going to be a hard border. You are. 

My money's on Britain to put the first parts in place. After all, reassurances by the Johnson government are worth as much as...yours.

Meanwhile, the EU has already concluded that no-deal would create a hard border, and that the backstop was the way to avoid this.

Your problem, as with all no-deal fundamentalists, is your insistence that the circle can be squared.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You aren't content with leaving Northern Irish people to make the decision themselves. You want to work against that will. That is sinister.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Besides the fact that Ireland, the EU and the UK have categorically stated that they will not create a hard border.

And where in signed agreement between the EU and the UK does it state that when the current agreement includes the backstop.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You aren't content with leaving Northern Irish people to make the decision themselves.

You want to work against that will. That is sinister.

Twaddle. The people of Ireland, north and south will eventually vote in favour of a 32 county Republic.

Aspiring to that, by peaceful means, in a democratic fashion is not sinister.

Your attempts to smear me, however, are cause for concern.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The people of Ireland, north and south will eventually vote in favour of a 32 county Republic

But Toasted. What if they don't. What if they want the opposite of what you want?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@Zichi

And where in signed agreement between the EU and the UK does it state that when the current agreement includes the backstop.

All three parties have stated it.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/taoiseach-insists-there-will-be-no-hard-border-despite-eu-statement-1.3767158

https://twitter.com/nick_gutteridge/status/1110130145514438656

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

But Toasted. What if they don't. What if they want the opposite of what you want?

Dialogue.

Not violence, not underhanded tricks, not smears or sectarianism.

Certainly not the jingoism and falsehoods promoted by Johnson et al.

Irish people want reunification. But it must be peaceful, democratic and inclusive. Otherwise it can't work.

I'm not sure what you want me to say - just what exactly are you implying?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Tangerine2000 

All three parties have stated it.

Then please provide a link to the document signed by the EU/Ireland/UK agreeing there will no border under any circumstances between the North and South of Ireland, and that the already agreed backstop is amended and cancelled

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Then please provide a link to the document signed by the EU/Ireland/UK agreeing there will no border under any circumstances between the North and South of Ireland, and that the already agreed backstop is amended and cancelled

Why would there be a document? I have never said that there is an agreement between them. I am saying there'll be no hard border because all three parties have said they'll not construct/enforce one.

You need to produce some evidence of the EU, UK or Ireland stating that they'll create a hard border. Do you have such evidence?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Irish people want reunification. But it must be peaceful, democratic and inclusive. Otherwise it can't work.

Can't speak for the Republic, but Northern Irish people don't want it. You need their consent. You believe they want to rejoin Ireland, but I'm telling you they don't.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Can't speak for the Republic, but Northern Irish people don't want it.

You can't say all the people of Northern Ireland do not support a united Ireland. You can say a majority of people don't support but that may change depending on what happens with the Brexit.

Recent poll

March 2019

Irish Times/Ipsos Mori

United 32%

Against 45%

Undecided 23%

Lead 13%

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why would there be a document? I have never said that there is an agreement between them. I am saying there'll be no hard border because all three parties have said they'll not construct/enforce one. 

Because all government agreements require a legal signed document not just "he said so!"

You need to produce some evidence of the EU, UK or Ireland stating that they'll create a hard border. Do you have such evidence?

The backstop is a hard border. The EU requires a border between itself and the other non EU countries just like in the case of the UK/France.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Zichi

You can't say all the people of Northern Ireland do not support a united Ireland

Yes, you can. If that changes in future, then you can say the opposite.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Can't speak for the Republic, but Northern Irish people don't want it. You need their consent. You believe they want to rejoin Ireland, but I'm telling you they don't.

I can't speak for the Irish people ( of the 32 counties) but there was no consent when Partition was forced upon the country.

I'm telling you. The days of "no surrender" triumphalism and discrimination against Catholics are long over.

From Ballymena to Bantry, the bells will be ringing when the chains are finally broken.

5, years, 15, 25... it's going to happen. And to think, it was Brexit that broke the union!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm telling you. The days of "no surrender" triumphalism and discrimination against Catholics are long over.

Yes, the days are over. So, stop trying to force your will on others.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@Zichi

It's starting to feel like I'm having a conversation with an automated voice service.

Because all government agreements require a legal signed document not just "he said so!"

I. AM. NOT. SAYING. THE. UK. AND. EU. HAVE. MADE. AN. AGREEMENT. TO. HAVE. NO. BORDER.

They have all stated that they themselves will not construct one.

The backstop is a hard border. The EU requires a border between itself and the other non EU countries just like in the case of the UK/France.

Not my question. One last time. WHO. WILL. BUILD. THE. HARD. BORDER?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@Toasted Heretic,

youre the one who said when people are fighting for their freedom there are going to be casualties.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Tangerine2000

They have all stated that they themselves will not construct one.

First there has been a border between the North and South for many decades but because both the UK and Ireland were members of the EU and more importantly because of the Good Friday Agreement the passing of the border was relaxed such like in all the other EU countries.

The EU wants a backstop and are not prepared to remove it.

Politicians state all sorts of stuff all of the time which later they find some excuse not to do.

The backstop is already in place and the EU can make it happen.

Until Ireland/EU/Uk signs a legally binding document stating under no circumstances will there be a border then I don't just accept their word as being their honor. More fools those who do.

It's starting to feel like I'm having a conversation with an automated voice service.

Then you are freed from responding to my comments and just ignore them then.

There is a border between Northern counties and Ireland. Been there since the British invented it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Ireland tells Boris Johnson there will be no backstop renegotiation

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/aug/11/ireland-tells-boris-johnson-there-will-be-no-backstop-renegotiation

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Not my question. One last time. WHO. WILL. BUILD. THE. HARD. BORDER?

You suffer from the usual Brexit delusion. That you can ignore reality and crap on everyone who won't go along with you on that.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

youre the one who said when people are fighting for their freedom there are going to be casualties.

Yes, see the peaceful Civil Rights marches in Derry and how British soldiers murdered protesters.

You haven't replied to my initial question, btw. About the GFA, and how it will make the UK much better off, being endangered.

I'm presuming you don't wish for a resurgence of the troubles and children's being intimidated on them way to school.

Do you think the DUP have a leg to stand on?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

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