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Brexit battle looms as UK lawmakers attack May's 'Plan B'

16 Comments
By JILL LAWLESS

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16 Comments
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An IMC and SkyNews polls just revealed that a majority of Britons now want a hard break, no deal Brexit. Please give it to them Ms May.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

It’s a damning indictment on democracy when intransigent EU leaders refuse to negotiate but their future economic losses will come back to haunt them.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

No deal is going to be the outcome. I can't see any other outcome.

Its time for canzuk

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

When polled, 25% of Britons said "No Deal" meant staying in the EU.

Probably the classic work on British Politics, "The English Constitution" by Walter Bagehot written in the 1860s, refers to the "bovine stupidity" of the masses. We may have tvs and fancy computers now, but it seems like little has changed.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

There is no plan b.

May is going to have to ask for an extension to Article 50 soon.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Three things:

First, it never ceases to amaze me how many commenters who disagree with leaving the EU feel the need to call those that want to leave, "stupid".

Second, the EU has now said they will erect a hard border in the Republic of Ireland in the event of No-Deal. Varadkar is now starting to realise how little power he has over this situation, even if Ireland doesn't want a border.

Third, Queen Elizabeth has been drawn into this mess. Remainer MPs will try to force Brexit-wrecking amendments through parliament, forcing the the Queen to refuse Royal Assent if requested to do so by the Government. An extremely rare event (not happened since 1707), but now that the Monarch has been involved, it is highly unlikely that MPs who are trying to scupper/delay Brexit will be allowed to.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

EU spokesman Margaritis Schinas said Tuesday that in "a no-deal scenario in Ireland, I think it's pretty obvious, you will have a hard border."

Who is going to police this border?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Scrote

EU army personnel of course! Macron and Merkel were signing a treaty yesterday to bring the EU army one step closer.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Plan B = Back Up

But if people want new referendum and wins against Brexit.

Then it's draw. It's even more complicated. Somehow one has to win over another. Then again another referendum? That's why, this is it. The game already ended 2 years ago.

The only choice, Brexit without any deals. No such thing like meals for deals like in Subway or Mcdonalds. Stay British with its' own borders.

Where's the British Pride?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

May held talks with government and opposition politicians and came up with a "Plan B" — one that looked remarkably similar to her Plan A.

She continues to be a total disaster.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The mere suggestion that there could be a hard boarder between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom is fanciful, beyond ludicrous its preposterous political posturing.

Ireland has 208 border crossings, officials from North and South agree..........‘Nightmare’ of mapping out all roads, paths and dirt tracks that traverse 500km frontier

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/ireland-has-208-border-crossings-officials-from-north-and-south-agree-1.3474246

Such an undertaking could never be enforcible. The time set aside for legislative mapping procedures, agreed protocols to establish if the land or road is either private or public could or would be measured in years.

Then factor in a defined political methodology to extend article 50, and then the necessary new primary legislation. The specific question the electorate would need make an informed decision on must negotiate a route through parliament.

Then there are the hoops and hurdles presented by the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000.

The question would have to be assessed by the Electoral Commission. Not weeks or months, realistically think years. Longer if legal blocking manoeuvring slows down the legislation.

Politically, economically, all twenty eight will have to prepare for a clean break, and learn from there foolishness, intransigence.

*
-3 ( +0 / -3 )

After 2 years of no one coming up with any better ideas the May, MPs have almost decided to get together to come up with a plan the EU will reject. Facepalm.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

*than May

1 ( +1 / -0 )

BackpackingNepalToday  11:24 am JST

Where's the British Pride?

It's British pride that has created this mess! It's British pride that is making this process so bloody ridiculous. What we need is some humility to admit that the referendum process was flawed.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Who is going to police this border?

Ireland and the UK, obviously.

A hard border would be awful, it needs to be avoided at all costs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Luddite: The Irish government says it will not set up any border infrastructure. If the UK government does the same there will be no border controls at all. Neither side can be forced to set up border controls.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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