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Brexit: Johnson faces mounting legal, political, diplomatic challenges

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By Guy Faulconbridge and Gabriela Baczynska

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Boris Johnson is outlining a very clear and firm position but it is a totally unreasonable position that the EU cannot facilitate

One of the most true statements regarding Johnson’s requests.

This is all fake news. Johnson promised a smooth and quick Brexit deal. I’m sure the EU has already given into everything he requested. England holds all the cards.

-13 ( +3 / -16 )

It's not just leaving without a deal, some of these traitors actually wants to thwart an exit altogether.

They should get their noses out of the EU trough and take a look, USA is realigning the global order, the sooner Britain is out of the EU, the sooner it can start bilateral free trade deals with the rest of the world.

The EU and China won't have its comparative advantage in tge very near future. Trump has unleashed on China, the EU will be next.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

"The EU and China won't have its comparative advantage in tge very near future. Trump has unleashed on China, the EU will be next."

The EU and China will still be out there long after Trump's gone; that's a fact.

Some in Britain seems to not know of this fact; Trump is ephemeral.

What about once he's gone?

Buy his bull at own peril.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

England holds all the cards.

What?

It's not just leaving without a deal, some of these traitors actually wants to thwart an exit altogether.

Spoken like a true demagogic nationalist populist authoritarian. Anyone against Johnson's Brexit coup is a traitor now, are they? It seems this drivel is what passes for normal in the foetid world of Trumpthink.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

Well, it seems that Russia and Mossad have already posted their nonsensical comments, especially like the one where Britain holds all of the cards against EVERY EU country, who so desperately need Britain's exports......of what? Nasty English sausage? I can't wait for the lines of trucks backed up for miles at the English border waiting to psy tariffs and for British tourists now having to get Visas. And then when the supermarket shelves to get emptied! What a hoot, and then the fights over the last bit of food and wine! Maybe, for act 2, england will build a wall around themselves, and then each town can seal themselves off from each other! That should solve the problem.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Brexit will be a disaster. The me and more obvious it looks, the more pro-Brexit fanatics dig their heels in with confused demands to "take back control". Yet none of them can ever manage to point to a law coming from the EU that Britain opposed and which they want to be free from.

It's quite a fun game to play with a Brexiteer.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

It is clear that the Tories for years have been operating without the purpose of determining what is best for the country, and instead what is best for them individually and as a party. 

It is also clear that the UK politicians do not understand the true nature of referendums, nor do they want to enact the TRUE will of the people. The initial vote was seriously flawed, much more information has come out, it was poorly structured since it didn't capture the options properly, and the electorate has changed over the last few years. Thus, if they were TRULY interested in understanding and enacting the will of the people, they would have had a second referendum to gauge the public will more accurately.

Lastly, the Tories (like the GOP in the US), have been infected with an erosion of democratic and constitutional values. Like ancient Rome, every generation must recommit to these in order to preserve them, and failing that, the entire constitutional system becomes corrupted and ultimately fails. Rome's republic lasted longer than ours, but ultimately failed for these reasons. Why should we think that the same rot won't do us in, especially when we see it growing now here in the US as well as the UK?

9 ( +11 / -2 )

It's becoming increasingly difficult to remain a free and sovereign nation any more. The world is moving rapidly to a completely intertwined global economy, culture and legal system. Nations that wish to retain thier own identity and culture and look out for thier own economy will have a hard time doing so. The globalists, other nations and some of thier own people will punish them.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Nations that wish to retain thier own identity and culture and look out for thier own economy will have a hard time doing so. The globalists, other nations and some of thier own people will punish them.

Not completely true. The problem with 'this' brexit is that the instigators didn't/ still don't really know what they want; they aren't rejecting globalism per se, they want to have their cake and eat it too, want access to EU markets...for free! Not gonna happen.

I would have no pbm (and would even applaud) a 'true' brexit i.e 'let's go it alone and be true to ourselves/our values even/especially if that means we have to scale down our lifestyle, less $ etc'. That's not what these guys want.

Brexit or not, I think UK pollies owe the Brits (remainers & leavers), Irish and all Europeans a formal apology for the shenanigans of the last 3 years & the millions of euros/pounds & energy wasted preparing/waiting for a 'confused' uk to make up their mind.

If they end up staying in the EU, they'll have to 'try harder/do better'.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Theresa May stalled and delayed and took it to the brink. She failed to get Brexit through.

Johnson is doing the same stalling and delaying, with more bravado perhaps, but its still brinksmanship and still likely to fail. That's because he doesn't have a majority in Parliament, like the defense secretary was caught saying on camera two days ago.

As for these tactics to outmaneuver Parliament, everyone saw it coming a mile off. Johnson and the people in his cabinet are on the record with those now embarrassing comments because they were asked direct questions about it two months ago. Cunning plans are not supposed to be predictable.

The clearest road to no deal is with a bumbling and divided opposition. Johnson's actions are hardening and uniting people against him. It won't take long to revoke Article 50, a simple procedure, so I guess the opposition will keep that up their sleeve as the last-minute nuclear option and work back from there.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

CrazyJoeToday  08:27 am JST

It is clear that the Tories for years have been operating without the purpose of determining what is best for the country, and instead what is best for them individually and as a party. 

Of course. That's how we got this stupid situation in the first place - Cameron thought the EU referendum would bury the Tory Eurosceptics when the public voted to remain. Just a tactic to cement his own authority and end party divisions that backfired catastrophically.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This is all fake news. Johnson promised a smooth and quick Brexit deal. I’m sure the EU has already given into everything he requested. England holds all the cards.

I feel hurt. No one recognizes my satire in my original post. Do I really think U.K. holds all the cards? No. Especially since leaving the EU now places them at risk of having the U.K. dissolved. Ireland wants to remain in the EU. While the U.K. is a major economic player, it does not come before Germany or even France in terms of economic power. So they are dwarfed by the EU as a whole.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This whole situation underscores the problems with our unwritten Constitution.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not knowing much about British parliamentary procedure, I'd like to ask someone who knows would it not be possible to bring down his government if enough members were to leave his party/coalition Last I heard, he had a majority of one.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Scottish courts yesterday rejected an appeal and the same is likely in English courts to reject the appeals against the shutdown.

I guess MP Bozo thought, well Trump shutdown the American government for the longest period in history so his five weeks would be shorter in comparison.

I think Bozo's exit plans will remain in place and only he has the real power to ask for a delay or even cancel Article 50. He's not even consulting with his cabinet. He's a one man band on the loose.

The country is on course to crash out without a deal.

Next the EU could scrap the Oct 31 deadline which was introduced by Macron. That would move the goal posts but PM Bozo could still decide to leave.

Terrible that this whole episode is happening with PM Bozo elected by less than 100,000 people. The has to be a better system for electing the PM.

Any Tory MP who votes to block the no deal next week will find themselves disqualified from contesting their seat in the next general election.

61 days and countdown......

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"Scottish courts yesterday rejected an appeal and the same is likely in English courts to reject the appeals against the shutdown."

That's incorrect; Mr, Justice rDoherty ejected to fast track an injunction.

Full hearing will take place next Tuesday, intead of yesterday.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

correction then

That's incorrect; Mr, Justice rDoherty ejected to fast track an injunction.

Full hearing will take place next Tuesday, intead of yesterday.

But I think the courts in Scotland and England will reject the appeals for injunctions since Bozo followed the laws.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Of course. That's how we got this stupid situation in the first place - Cameron thought the EU referendum would bury the Tory Eurosceptics when the public voted to remain. Just a tactic to cement his own authority and end party divisions that backfired catastrophically.

It’s also been suggested Cameron didn’t expect to win a majority and would have happily ‘caved’ to the wishes of a coalition partner in scrapping his referendum promise.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

How about suing the politicians responsible for delaying the will of the people?

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

Serrano

How about suing the politicians responsible for delaying the will of the people?

It wasn't a legally blinding referendum which only asked two questions, leave or stay?

There was no question about leaving without a deal.

In the 2017 general election in the conservative manifesto there was nothing about leaving without a deal.

So there isn't a mandate for that.

Compared with your own president election, the will of the people voted for Hilary but Trump became president.

Just like American politicians they make promises by the hour but never keep them like Trump in his campaign, "Paid for Mexican Wall" "Bring the troops home" "Obamacare" "Will be too busy to play much golf"

11 ( +12 / -1 )

SerranoToday  11:39 am JST

How about suing the politicians responsible for delaying the will of the people

Yes, if I want to waste all of my savings on lawyer's fees for a case that gets laughed out of court that's definitely what I'll do.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

The EU have just announced that they wish to scrap the October 31 deadline to avoid a No-Deal Brexit.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/08/30/eu-wants-extend-article-50-avoid-no-deal-brexit-eurosceptics/

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@expat

Not knowing much about British parliamentary procedure, I'd like to ask someone who knows would it not be possible to bring down his government if enough members were to leave his party/coalition Last I heard, he had a majority of one.

Yes, the Government can be brought down if members leave or switch parties. However, Remainer MPs probably don't want to do this because it would result in an election.

Boris has the right to try and form a new government within 14 days, if the opposition cannot form one (which is virtually impossible with Corbyn), then Boris has the right to call a general election. Boris has the authority to call the election after October 31. This would be a nightmare for Remainers MPs, because parliament would be adjorned, but the PM remains the PM until there is a new government. This means Boris could do anything he likes without anyone in the HoC to oppose him.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

How about suing the politicians responsible for delaying the will of the people

Yes, if I want to waste all of my savings on lawyer's fees for a case that gets laughed out of court that's definitely what I'll do.

How about firing the judges that would laugh at efforts to get politicians to carry out the will of the people and replacing them with judges who won't do that? Nah, guess ya'll have to wait for the next election and vote out the politicians who have subverted the will of the people.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

This means Boris could do anything he likes without anyone in the HoC to oppose him.

That sounds so democratic.

This is where you tell us that that was all decided in June 2016, and the people voted for no-deal.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@wipeout

That sounds so democratic.

That is the parliamentary system that is in place. I don't think it was designed by Brexiteers.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The "will of the people" by a slight margin and not a clear majority of the people, but a majority of the voters who turned out was to leave the EU. There are two countries which overwhelmingly voted to remain. Scotland and Northern Ireland.

There is no "will of the people" to leave without a deal, and no mandate.

Better to delay than a no deal.

How about firing the judges that would laugh at efforts to get politicians to carry out the will of the people and replacing them with judges who won't do that? Nah, guess ya'll have to wait for the next election and vote out the politicians who have subverted the will of the people.

Does that equally apply in your America where even the president can be challenged?

How about the "will of the people" who voted for Hilary but Trump was made president?

Criticising our political system is like you throwing stones at your own glass house.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Anyone against Johnson's Brexit coup is a traitor now, are they?

How would you characterize them then?

The people voted to leave the cesspit, these 'xxxx' keeps working against the democratic will of the people. Also, why is the EU so desperate to keep Britain in the customs union? Because it knows Britain is a dependable trade partner of USA, and without Britain, the tariffs will be unleashed immediately.

The only people that can't see this are the ones highly dependent on the EU NOT the British democracy. Traitors.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The EU have just announced that they wish to scrap the October 31 deadline to avoid a No-Deal Brexit.

Surprise, surprise...so they were negotiating in bad faith with PM May previously then.

It takes a no deal politician to get the EU cesspit to arrive at this?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

But I think the courts in Scotland and England will reject the appeals for injunctions since Bozo followed the laws.

It's for the court to determine whether the law was followed. As these laws are not clearly written anywhere, it's a little complicated. During the case for an interim interdict (temporary injunction), the Claim of Right of 1689 was referred to. A little obscure, some might say, but as the Privy Counsellor who took the suspension request to the Queen is sometimes referred to as the Member of Parliament for the 17th Century, it may be appropriate. :-)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The EU have just announced that they wish to scrap the October 31 deadline to avoid a No-Deal Brexit.

Surprise, surprise...

Strange that such as cataclysmic piece of 'news' is being reported only in the right-wing Telegraph. It's behind a subscriber wall, and since I'm not about to give the Telegraph my personal details, all I can read its the first couple of sentences or so....

... and those sentences do not say that 'The EU have just announced that they wish to scrap the October 31 deadline', merely that "the European Commission said another extension was “obviously a possibility”".

-which Bozo has said it is not. Do or die, and all that.

Invalid CSRF

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@cleo

Gordon Brown has just announced that the EU is ready to give an extension to avoid No-Deal

https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk/political-parties/labour-party/gordon-brown/news/106177/gordon-brown-eu-ready-offer-uk

Hopefully, that will satisfy you. (Not behind paywall)

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Gordon Brown has just announced...

Brown's 'ready to offer the UK an extension to the Brexit deadline' is a far cry from the Telegraph's 'they wish to scrap the October 31 deadline'.

In other words, the UK might be allowed a bit of wriggle room, not the EU will do anything to avoid a no-deal'.

Never take anything you read on the Internet at face value, until you've checked it from every angle.

And especially, never take at face value a click-bait headline in a paywall article.

And at the end of the Politicshome article, a quote from Bozo - '*that’s the best way forward for our country, *believe me'.

Never, ever, ever, believe a politician who needs to remind you to believe him.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Cleo, did you actually read it?

Here are some excerpts:

The former Prime Minister said he had been told by European leaders that they were prepared to scrap the 31 October cut-off.

Speaking in Edinburgh, Mr Brown said the 31 October was suggested by French president Emmanuel Macron, but that it could be ditched as early as next week.

The ex-Labour leader, who opposes Brexit, said: "My information is that Macron no longer holds to that deadline. It was really introduced for his campaign in the European elections to make him sound tough. And none of the other European Commissioners, including the new President of the European Commission [Ursula von der Leyen], I believe will hold to that 31 October deadline.

None of these quotes are anything to do with Boris.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The EU have just announced that they wish to scrap the October 31 deadline to avoid a No-Deal Brexit.

As far as I know, this has not yet been announced by the EU. There is only a vague statement from Gordon Brown that they might do this. I suspect he's been pushing for it. If it happens, it will be interesting to see how Johnson reacts. He could do his bit for democracy and put May's agreement to a referendum along with no deal and remain as alternatives.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

SerranoToday  01:18 pm JST

How about firing the judges that would laugh at efforts to get politicians to carry out the will of the people and replacing them with judges who won't do that?

Do you know who would do that?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If Britain's worthless politicians had carried out Brexit by the end of March as they were supposed to, Johnson wouldn't have all these legal, political and diplomatic challenges, Britain would already have negotiated new trade deals with various countries and would have control of their borders and their own destiny, free of the unelected globalists in Brussels.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

If Britain's worthless politicians had carried out Brexit by the end of March as they were supposed to, Johnson wouldn't have all these legal, political and diplomatic challenges

The exit agreement negotiated with the EU was submitted to Parliamentary vote. That was the opportunity to carry out Brexit by the end of March. Five of the current cabinet members, including Johnson, voted against it. Twice. On 15 January and 12 March. The second vote, as you see, was just over two weeks ahead of the deadline to leave.

He and his cabinet colleagues could have voted for it; and if it had passed, Britain would have left. He, like many others in parliament, chose to shoot the agreement down, and May, as PM, was able to request an extension of the deadline.

Apparently he believes his half-arsed approach as Prime Minister - that no one else gets to know what he's actually going to do, but we'll all just have to live with it once he's done it - is a better method than gaining the approval of parliament or the people. But what he (and you) can't say is that it's someone else's fault Britain hasn't left yet. He exercised his vote, twice, and voted against.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@albaleo

Apparently, Boris' negotiating team have refused the idea of even a technical extension from the EU to provide time to ratify any new deal. If you are interested in the details:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbEUPSn_FF0

It seems they really want to put pressure on the EU to deliver a reasonable deal by the EU summit on Oct 17. Fair play, I say. If the EU cannot produce a fair deal in those circumstances, then a WTO Brexit will be the best choice.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Bring back May.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Bring back May.

What for? We are not masochists here.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Bring back May.

May blew a majority with what is widely regarded as one of the worst general election campaigns in history. The parliament wiped its backside with her withdrawal agreement more than once.

A terrible PM.

@serrano

You need to expand your sources. Fox News, deranged crackpots in basements and Katie Hopkins are not generally good with detail.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Shutting down parliament for the longest time in history. Thinking of introducing a new bank holiday. Not talking with his other cabinet members some who oppose the shutdown. Having no mandate to leave without a deal.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Tangerine2000, yes I read it and it said nothing about the EU wanting to scrap the deadline.

prepared to scrap** **is not the same as ***wish to scrap.

*could be ditched** **is also not the same as ***wish to scrap.

*And none ....., I believe ~* is nothing more than hearsay and wishful thinking on the part of Gordon Brown.

None of these quotes are anything to do with Boris.

Doesn't change the fact that any politician who has to ask people to believe him is definitely dodgy.

If Britain's worthless politicians....

Oh my, a colonial calling another country's politicians worthless.

Still, I suppose you get plenty of practice picking 'em out at home.

T'would be funny if it weren't so sad and a bit embarassing. And if there didn't seem to be a worldwide trend to put moronic crazies in positions of power.

Invalid CSRF

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What a sad end to the country formerly known as "Perfidious Albion". Over the last couple of centuries, Britain's elite has taken a robust, strong population of enthusiastic people and left their best all over the world in ditches and sick tents and colonists and much that was 'best' in a people did not come home. We see the result of these many years of the export of the Best of Britain. The remaining "Great Britain' relative to its former glory is pathetic. Political talent is zero. The People faced with yet another disastrous choice of their elite are essentially as quiet as the cows further back in the corral who don't see what's going on at the abattoir end. They seem, in the main, to 'trust' their politicians, the same dementation afflicting many in America today. I suspect that Britain will step off of The Union and look down and see what the Roadrunner ALWAYS sees. And the landing won't be pretty if those who claim to know are correct. And nothing says "Let's pick on that guy nextdoor" to average people like financial desperation. Hmmm, 'interesting times' ahead for the Brits, methinks.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

zichi - It wasn't a legally blinding referendum which only asked two questions, leave or stay?

There was no question about leaving without a deal.

This non-legally "blinding" referendum has resulted in G.B.'s THIRD government since the people voted to leave the E.U.. It certainly appears that a great many people are taking the leave/remain vote very seriously.

The voters were asked whether, or not, they wished to leave or remain. The voters were not asked for suggestions as to how their elected representatives should carry out a democratically arrived at demand that G.B. leave the E.U.. The "how" of how the elected representatives would accomplish the will of the people would be left up to the elected representatives, because the people did not specifically tell their elected reps how to leave the E.U.. The people elected representatives to represent the will of the people, not to undermine the will of the people. Plus various factions within the democracy have chosen to stymie, or delay, carrying out the will of the people.

Why bother to have a democratic vote if elected reps can chose not to obey the will of the people? Might as well return to Royal rule.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

zichi - Having no mandate to leave without a deal.

The "mandate" from the voters is to leave the E.U..

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

It’s cleat that the leavers have zero confidence that the people still want to leave, which is proven by their desperation to avoid actually finding that out, screaming that what people felt three years ago is more important than what they think now. Sure they come up with lies to pretend otherwise, but their lies are transparent for all to see.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The voters were asked whether, or not, they wished to leave or remain. The voters were not asked for suggestions as to how their elected representatives should carry out a democratically arrived at demand that G.B. leave the E.U.

That is because the voters understand that we have a parliament, and that as part of British democracy, these decisions are made by parliament, not forced on the country by Prime Ministers suspending parliament. Precedent and constitutional norms are important; all elections and referendums are held on that understanding.

And when you speak of elected representatives, Johnson is Prime Minister not by popular will, but by virtue of winning the Conservative leadership contest, with a total of 160,000 votes. The Conservative Party itself is in government because it won the most recent general election with just 42.4% of the total vote against Labour's 40%. They had no party majority in the House of Commons, winning only 318 out of 650 seats (currently reduced to 311 and a parliamentary majority of 1). They were able to retain power by establishing a coalition with the DUP, a party that represents one side of a dangerously divided community in Northern Ireland; a region whose own Assembly has been suspended since before the 2017 UK general election. There is little appetite outside Northern Ireland for the DUP, any more than there is for Sinn Fein.

What this comes down to is that Johnson cannot possibly be assured of winning a general election, whether held before or after Brexit. He has the smallest parliamentary majority it's possible to have; he fronts a party that has no outright majority in parliament and won by

0 ( +2 / -2 )

and won by

0 ( +0 / -0 )

arrestpaulToday  08:19 am JST

zichi - Having no mandate to leave without a deal.

The "mandate" from the voters is to leave the E.U..

-1( +1 / -2 )

arrestpaulToday  08:14 am JST

The voters were asked whether, or not, they wished to leave or remain.

I think fewer people would have voted to leave if they knew the politicians leading the pro-Leave campaign had no idea what to do next if the referendum went their way.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

arrestpaul

The "mandate" from the voters is to leave the E.U..

Yes but that does not include leaving without a deal which wasn't a question on the referendum nor was it in the conservative manifesto in the last 2017 general election.

So again, there is a mandate to leave but not without a deal

Why bother to have a democratic vote if elected reps can chose not to obey the will of the people? Might as well return to Royal rule.

Politicians do that daily world over.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

arrestpaulToday  08:14 am JST

Why bother to have a democratic vote if elected reps can chose not to obey the will of the people?

Because the actual purpose of the referendum was to shut up the Tory Eurosceptics. Cameron took it for granted that most people would vote Remain. So did the Leave campaign, so they had no idea what to do when they did actually win.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It wasn't the "will of the people" it was the will of about 17 million voters but the turnout was not 100%. Total voters is about 47 million people so 17 million isn't a majority of the people or the "will of the people".

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The decision to leave the EU without a deal isn't a decision made by the people or even parliament. That decision was made by PM Bozo without consulting with parliament or even his own cabinet members.

During a very important and critical time it's a disgrace to democracy to shut down parliament for longest period in history.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Prevarication is not on the table any longer.

If the people wish to end Tory rule after Brexit then they are able to.

However, with the support given from Nigel Farage supporters to the Tories then Boris Johnson is set to rule.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

kurisupisuToday  05:20 pm JST

However, with the support given from Nigel Farage supporters to the Tories then Boris Johnson is set to rule.

Do you think those Farage supporters will be happy to vote for Tory Brexit rebels who have defected to the Lib Dems or been de-selected?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Boris has stepped into deep dog dung on this one. I wouldn't be surprised if the Queen didn't step in and dismiss him and schedule new PM elections.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

wipeout - That is because the voters understand that we have a parliament, and that as part of British democracy, these decisions are made by parliament, not forced on the country by Prime Ministers suspending parliament. Precedent and constitutional norms are important; all elections and referendums are held on that understanding.

And when you speak of elected representatives, Johnson is Prime Minister not by popular will, but by virtue of winning the Conservative leadership contest,

MP's are elected representatives. You seem to be under the mistaken impression that I have claimed that the PM is elected by the people. Quite the opposite.

Let's recap the situation. A democratic vote resulted in a mandate from the people to leave the E.U.. How G.B. would leave the E.U. would be left to Parliament.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Simon Foston - Because the actual purpose of the referendum was to shut up the Tory Eurosceptics.

Regardless of why the original referendum was created, it has since taken on a life of it's own. A majority of the people who bothered to vote, voted to leave the E.U.. So far, it appears that many elected representatives have either been fighting the effort to leave, or dragging the process out and making a successful conclusion (to leave) all but impossible.

Demanding that a 2nd referendum be held sounds like good idea, but undermines the democratic vote process. Unless, of course, you want to keep having referendums until you get the results you want/demand.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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