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California to apologize for internment of Japanese-Americans

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Another shameful event in America's history. Like others who grew up on the US west coast I knew families that had their properties, including valuable farmland, and businesses 'legally' stolen by the predator class aided by politicians from their demographic. These Nisei and Sansei families included some of the nicest people I've ever met. Unlike those from the predator class.

20 ( +29 / -9 )

Japanese American are nothing like Japan Japanese, they have the regular trait of American, but not keen on Japanese custom and traditional

-24 ( +9 / -33 )

California has now apologized for its brutality and theft of the lands of Native Americans, they have apologized for slavery and Jim crow laws, and they have now apologized for Japanese internment camps.

Of those 3 groups. America has rewarded reparations only to 2 of them.

8 ( +18 / -10 )

It was wrong to imprison American citizens.

22 ( +25 / -3 )

Although obviously screwed up, their own homeland brought this upon them...and of course the military machine didn’t care...that’s what it means to be Japanese, like it or not.

-22 ( +7 / -29 )

Definitely not a shining moment in America’s history. The American Japanese community have always contributed a lot to the nation and California in general. Grew up going there visiting during the summer break, Love Little Tokyo and Torrance vibrant community.

22 ( +25 / -3 )

their own homeland brought this upon them

Their "homeland" was America. Majority born in America of Japanese descent.

23 ( +28 / -5 )

What year is this??

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

WA4TKGToday  08:26 am JST

Although obviously screwed up, their own homeland brought this upon them

Japanese immigrants who retained their nationality were deported as is normal custom. It was the imprisonment of American-born American Citizens of Japanese descent that was wrong. Your comment is a perfect example of the "they all look the same" racist mentality that brought about this huge stain in American history.

11 ( +19 / -8 )

Better late than never.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

@WA4TKG

Although obviously screwed up, their own homeland brought this upon them

Really? What were these 20,000 people going to do? The 20,000 comprised men, women, children, and elderly. Were they going to fight their way across the continental US and capture Washington DC?

10 ( +14 / -4 )

WA4TKGToday 08:26 am JST

Although obviously screwed up, their own homeland brought this upon them...and of course the military machine didn’t care...that’s what it means to be Japanese, like it or not.

Weren't they Americans though ?!

19 ( +22 / -3 )

I remember my buddy's dad tore up the $20,000 check he got from the government and chucked it in the trash.

The 20 grand was a slap in the face for having his whole family thrown in concentration camps and losing millions in agriculture, land and business they owned.

21 ( +22 / -1 )

Muratsuchi said the inspiration for that passage were migrant children held in U.S. government custody over the past year.

The two could not be more different. Comparing Japanese Americans to illegal immigrants is both insulting and it shows how the US has completely lost it's moral compass.

6 ( +17 / -11 )

There were also around 11,000 German-Americans (including children) interned in camps during WW2, often on flimsy evidence that they or their parents had some connections with the German government or the Nazi party. When compensation was paid in the 1980s exclusively to Japanese Americans and their descendants, some of the German-Americans who had been interned as children sued to say that it was unfair to exclude them. They ended up losing their fight because the courts said that even though they had been interned for years, they hadn't faced any racial discrimination. These child-internees have never received any apology from the US government, or any compensation, and they aren't being included in California's 'Day of Remembrance' (which is explicitly limited to Japanese-Americans) despite California hosting 5 of the internment camps for ethnic Germans.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

The two could not be more different. Comparing Japanese Americans to illegal immigrants is both insulting and it shows how the US has completely lost it's moral compass.

Insulting? How so? There are many Mexican Americans confined in those camps as well. Many children and families as well. Some of the Japanese that were confined were Japanese American and some where Japanese immigrants. Many Mexicans were ripped from their homes in the US. Many families were destroyed. Jobs lost and savings. There are some who genuinely had their property seized because the government concluded that the funds used to pay for the property was made by illegal immigrants who didn't pay taxes.

Both are travesties and should not happen.

8 ( +15 / -7 )

Germans and Italians were interned in the US during WWII too; where's their apology and reparations?

7 ( +14 / -7 )

it's about time, it was pure racism. Where was German-American and Italian -American camps?

8 ( +12 / -4 )

For an easy read and understanding of just what many families had to undergo, please read something by Julie Otsuka, for example, I can recommend "When the Emperor was Divine".

I am not sure that an apology (or any payment of money) really addresses what happened at all; many of the underlying causes mean that something similar could even happen again.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

@fillmore2

"it was pure racism. Where was German-American and Italian -American camps?

There's a map on the link below of the dozens German internment camps in the US. The interned included US citizens, although you hardly hear about it, and the US House of Reps rejected a proposal not long ago to look into their treatment.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internment_of_German_Americans

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Insulting? How so? There are many Mexican Americans confined in those camps as well.

What exactly is your source on this. I could find no information on American citizens being detained. If it is happening its in extremely rare and special cases. Most people in those camps are people caught entering illegally, refugees and asylum seekers awaiting due process.

Many children and families as well. Some of the Japanese that were confined were Japanese American and some where Japanese immigrants.

How many Japanese Americans were illegal immigrants? Once again, you're trying to pick a rare exception and use it represent the general norm.

Many Mexicans were ripped from their homes in the US. Many families were destroyed. Jobs lost and savings. There are some who genuinely had their property seized because the government concluded that the funds used to pay for the property was made by illegal immigrants who didn't pay taxes.

Which was a result of someones choice to break the law. It is not the same as an entire ethnic group being rounded up and placed in confinement and having everything taken from them simply because of their race. Not since slavery has something like that happened on any scale.

Both are travesties and should not happen.

I'm sick of people trying to compare the worst atrocities of history to detaining immigrants at a border. It's despicable, its insulting to the people who were rounded up and mass murdered concentration camps and it shows that America has completely lost its sense of morality.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

@darknuts - There are numerous documented cases of this. The family of a very good friend of my father were U.S. citizens, were interned at Susanville, California and had a prosperous laundry business at the time, which they lost.

I am not sure if they teach this in U.S. high schools anymore but I learned this in high school in the 70s.

I am quite certain I can find some links to this as well

12 ( +13 / -1 )

It was not an attitude confined to California. The spirit of the time was based on the theory of eugenics. Standardized testing was based on it and was said to prove the superiority of certain people.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

It was 1942 and a World War. Applying todays standards to then doesn't cut the mustard. Wouldn't happen today. Worst part was taking their possessions. Canada did the same.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

It was a sad situation, but understandable why it was done.

-14 ( +5 / -19 )

@Bugle Boy - My dad and I spoke often of this before he passed away. He also said this was sad and in some ways understandable (considering the extreme fear after Pearl Harbor) but he believed (as do I) that it went way too far.

His friend's family were compensated somewhat (but according to my dad not nearly enough) for their lost time and also destroyed business.

It is a very shameful part of American History and although not much the apology is warranted. Reagan formally apologized for the country in 1988. I am glad to see the State doing this also as many impacted were in the State of California.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

The camps were concentration camps; "internment" is nothing more than a euphemism to disguise what they really were. The very existence, the very idea of the camps is a most shameful and unconstitutional part of our history.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Although obviously screwed up, their own homeland brought this upon them...

Their own homeland being the USA.

A shameful episode in the country's history. One which should never be repeated again.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

there was a book by Lowman "Magic" that seems to show strong proof that there was a spy ring of Japanese in the US who were spying for Japan

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

It was a necessary countermeasure. If Japan did the same thing would they apologize?

-10 ( +5 / -15 )

Any country that does not take care of potential problems during war is a foolish one.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

Vince BlackToday  05:11 pm JST

It was a necessary countermeasure. If Japan did the same thing would they apologize?

Are you putting the United States, a democracy with a constitution that protects the rights of every citizen, on the same level as the military controlled aligned-with-Nazi Germany Imperial Japan dictatorship of WWII??

10 ( +13 / -3 )

It was a necessary countermeasure. 

It wasn't.

The very existence, the very idea of the camps is a most shameful and unconstitutional part of our history.

We learned nothing: there are concentration camps on the border now. Fascism is back. It holds sway in the US Government. Let’s get rid of it.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Yes, Gemini-Americans and Italian-Americans were interned just like Japanese Americans. Internment orders for all of them were were issued on the same day. Only they received no compensation. Senator Russ Feigold (D. Wisconsin) was fighting for the recognition of German-Americans, Italian-Americans when he was defeated by the Republicans.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

"Yes, Gemini-Americans and Italian-Americans were interned just like Japanese Americans. Internment orders for all of them were were issued on the same day"

Yes, but it's also pointless to try to be economical with the truth in this day and age.

Google is your best friend.

German-Americans internees had it FAR EASIER compared with the Japanese-Americans; that's well document and anyone can find out the evidence.

There were over a million German-Americans in the US; only about 11,000 of them went to the camps.

Conversely, the entire "Japanese" contingent was interned.

RACISM PURE AND SIMPLE.

"There were approximately 1.2 million German nationals as well as another 11 million US citizens who had at least one German-born parent.

Cases were looked at on an individual basis. In theory, people were only to be detained if they there was some evidence to suggest that they posed a threat.

As a result, 11,000 people were taken to DOJ camps. The majority of these were German nationals, but the number also included US citizens of German descent."

https://www.warhistoryonline.com/instant-articles/internment-of-germans.html

You may try to put a lipstick on a pig, but...

10 ( +12 / -2 )

It was a necessary countermeasure. 

To intern American citizens?

I think not.

It was a racist act that even GOP types acknowledge today.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

German-Americans internees had it FAR EASIER compared with the Japanese-Americans; that's well document and anyone can find out the evidence.

So whats your point? Many US citizens were of German ancestry with shared values. The Japanese at that time were a less understood culture and had attacked Pearl Harbor. Americans in German POW camps fared far better than any in a Japanese camp.

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

Any country that does not take care of potential problems during war is a foolish one.

Pres. Abraham Lincoln suspended the writ of habeas corpus in the first year of the U.S. Civil War.

Habeas corpus is a constitutional mandate requiring the government to give prisoners access to the courts.

Without it, anybody can be imprisoned without due process in a court of law and no charges filed.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The Japanese at that time were a less understood culture and had attacked Pearl Harbor.

But Americans of Japanese heritage did not attack Pearl Harbour.

Many Americans still, to this day, do not have an understanding of other Americans of Japanese heritage.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

darknutsToday  10:10 am JST

Muratsuchi said the inspiration for that passage were migrant children held in U.S. government custody over the past year.

The two could not be more different. Comparing Japanese Americans to illegal immigrants is both insulting and it shows how the US has completely lost it's moral compass.

I don't think that is what he meant. It is more about the treatment of humans by coldly separating family members through internment and deportation.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

its unfortunate but they had no choice back then. there were so many ninja japanese spies within those communities gathering and stealing info I am sure. they were taking precautions putting them in those camps. those groups should understand, and also consider the people who were murdered on Pearl Harbor by a sneak attack.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

We learned nothing: there are concentration camps on the border now. Fascism is back. It holds sway in the US Government. Let’s get rid of it.

Apples and Oranges argument! You’re talking about American citizens, not illegals that don’t have rights for breaking the law under any circumstance, that’s not racist, that’s what ever normal country does, even Mexico itself is very strict when it comes to their own borders, but for Japanese Americans, fear, mistrust, stereotypes and xenophobia were the main root causes for implementing the internment camps.

Many Americans still, to this day, do not have an understanding of other Americans of Japanese heritage.

Not many, maybe less than 0.1% of people that never opened a book or ventured out of their home or even turned on a TV, but as Californian, you know all too well about the history of Japanese Americans and what they went through.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

"So whats your point? Many US citizens were of German ancestry with shared values. The Japanese at that time were a less understood culture and had attacked Pearl Harbor. Americans in German POW camps fared far better than any in a Japanese camp."

And exactly what's yours?

Mine is to respond to another poster constantly "complaining" that the German-Americans did not get compensated; they had no property confiscated, most of them were not interned. They had it EASY.

And your point is?!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

there were so many ninja japanese spies within those communities gathering and stealing info I am sure.

Whether or not you're sure is irrelevant. Whether or not they were doing it would have been more relevant. Do you have any, and I mean ANY, information to support this assertion of yours, or did you just make it up and claim you were sure of it?

Because if you don't, that's the type of thinking that led to this atrocity in the first place.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

It was a shameful time, but it was far more than just racism that led to it. Read up on the Niihau incident for some insight. Unfortunately for all those innocent Japanese-Americans that were interned, the first opportunity for Japanese on American soil to show their loyalty, they chose loyalty to Japan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niihau_incident

I'm not saying in any way that the internment was the right thing to do, but fear is a powerful motivator and there was much more to it than just saying everyone was racist.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

don't cover up racism with all type of lame excuses, how many German and Italian Americans were internment camps compare to Japanese American. Just look at the numbers and read U.S history if you can.

These were U.S born second, third generation Japanese Americans, who actually served in WWII in Europe, many including past Senator from Hawaii was given Medal of Honor,

What the ... you talking about Ninja? are you serious man? stop drinking Sake at home.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

It’s nice to do but the US Congress apologized for this back in the 1980’s. It was under federal not state authority that Roosevelt discriminated against Japanese Americans. The apology for an historical wrong that has still not be given is the Democrat party’s apology for supporting slavery, Jim Crow, and the Klan. That’s the apology all Americans are still waiting on.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Germans and Italians were interned in the US during WWII too; where's their apology and reparations?

Were they American citizens? It was always my understanding that the difference was that non-Japanese who were descendants of the Axis power nations were not placed in detention based on their nationality.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Do you have any, and I mean ANY, information to support this assertion of yours, or did you just make it up and claim you were sure of it?

@Strangerland

Just connect the dots! It is almost common sense.. And again, if something like that happened, again such as Pearl Harbor, I personally would do it again. In some cases, better to be safe than sorry. Some would say it similar to stop and frisk policy in some circumstances and situations.

But this I am sure,...they were far better treated than American and other nation's POW's held by the japanese... I can guarantee that. Then again, the japanese these days do such a good job hiding everything from history and replacing it with anime and pokemon,.. knobody knows nor even cares. as long as they get their maid cafe akb48 girlfriend.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Just connect the dots! It is almost common sense.. And again, if something like that happened, again such as Pearl Harbor, I personally would do it again. In some cases, better to be safe than sorry. Some would say it similar to stop and frisk policy in some circumstances and situations

This is a lot of words to say, “No, I don’t have any sources and I’m just making things up.”

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The apology for an historical wrong that has still not be given is the Democrat party’s apology for supporting slavery, Jim Crow, and the Klan. That’s the apology all Americans are still waiting on.

Im an American and I’m not waiting for that apology.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Were they American citizens? It was always my understanding that the difference was that non-Japanese who were descendants of the Axis power nations were not placed in detention based on their nationality.

This is a common misconception because we hear mainly about the Japanese internment.

Immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt issued Presidential Proclamations 2525, 2526, and 2527 to authorize the United States to detain allegedly potentially dangerous enemy aliens. The FBI and other law enforcement agencies arrested thousands of suspected enemy aliens, mostly individuals of German, Italian, or Japanese ancestry, living throughout the United States.

The Department of Justice oversaw the processing of the cases and the internment program. Although many were released or paroled after hearings before a local alien enemy hearing board, for many the adversarial hearings resulted in internment that, in a few cases, lasted beyond the end of World War II.

https://www.archives.gov/research/immigration/enemy-aliens-overview

2 ( +3 / -1 )

But this I am sure,...they were far better treated than American and other nation's POW's held by the japanese... I can guarantee that. Then again, the japanese these days do such a good job hiding everything from history and replacing it with anime and pokemon,.. knobody knows nor even cares. as long as they get their maid cafe akb48 girlfriend.

Bingo!

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Apples and Oranges argument! You’re talking about American citizens, not illegals that don’t have rights for breaking the law under any circumstance

Anyone with a measurable intelligence knows that seeking asylum is not a criminal act.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Anyone with a measurable intelligence knows that seeking asylum is not a criminal act.

But entering in illegally is and the US does not under ANY circumstance have to accept any asylum seeker for any reason under the constitution.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

It’s nice to do but the US Congress apologized for this back in the 1980’s. It was under federal not state authority that Roosevelt discriminated against Japanese Americans. The apology for an historical wrong that has still not be given is the Democrat party’s apology for supporting slavery, Jim Crow, and the Klan. That’s the apology all Americans are still waiting on.

I agree.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Les Ouchida was born an American just outside California's capital city, but his citizenship mattered little after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and the United States declared war. Based solely on their Japanese ancestry, the 5-year-old and his family were taken from their home in 1942 and imprisoned far away in Arkansas.

Not "based solely on their Japanese ancestry". As mentioned above, there is the Niihau incident. On the same day as the undeclared Dec 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi crash landed his shot up plane on the sparsely-populated Niihau island. With the help of three, local, Japanese-Hawaiians, they terrorized the inhabitants of Niihau island until Dec 13.

The actions of Shintani and the Haradas, all Niihauans of Japanese ancestry, were noted in a January 1942 Navy report as indications of the ‘likelihood that Japanese residents previously believed loyal to the United States may aid Japan.’ With the nation in an uproar over the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, there can be no doubt that the Niihau event influenced the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt to summarily remove more than 100,000 persons of Japanese ancestry from the West Coast and intern them in the U.S. interior.

https://www.historynet.com/the-niihau-incident.htm

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Arrest: In your attempt to disprove it was based in Japanese ancestry, you proved it was based on Japanese ancestry. Smooth.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

But entering in illegally is and the US does not under ANY circumstance have to accept any asylum seeker for any reason under the constitution.

Uhhh . . . The constitution does not speak to who should be accepted upon applying for asylum. How did you get that so wildly incorrect?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Uhhh . . . The constitution does not speak to who should be accepted upon applying for asylum.

“Illegal” is illegal, breaking and entering regardless is illegal and as such is an act that can be prosecuted

Yes, it is.

No, it was not.

If entering the US without documents is illegal, why isn’t it held against people seeking asylum?

It often is and especially now more than ever.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Many Americans still, to this day, do not have an understanding of other Americans of Japanese heritage.

And whos fault is that? There were many complaints from locals when Japanese immigrants came to Hawaii as they were being insolent and insular.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

“Illegal” is illegal, breaking and entering regardless is illegal and as such is an act that can be prosecuted

You have zero understanding of immigration law and are arguing with someone who has a six digit number that allows him to represent people in court.

No, it was not.

Prove it. What is it with conservatives and not taking responsibility for their own words or actions?

It often is and especially now more than ever

No, it isn’t. You’re doubling down on displaying your ignorance of immigration law. It’s entertaining to watch.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

“Illegal” is illegal, breaking and entering regardless is illegal and as such is an act that can be prosecuted

Nobody is arguing against this. This, however, is irrelevant to the constitution not speaking directly to who should be granted asylum.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Any country who has been attacked has the right, and will, investigate insular communities whos alignment and allegiance is with the attacker. that could be muslim or Japananese or whoever. the elephant in the room your ignoring is that the country had just been attacked and suffered many deaths from that, and the same enemy wanted to expand their empire to include Hawaii Alaska and the west coast.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

You have zero understanding of immigration law

I do, I’m from a border state.

Prove it.

I already outlined it. Entering in any sovereign country illegally is a crime and even if you have asylum papers, it doesn’t have to be granted.

No, it isn’t.

Yes, it is

https://thehill.com/opinion/immigration/413470-trump-can-refuse-to-accept-asylum-applications

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Chipstar - Arrest: In your attempt to disprove it was based in Japanese ancestry, you proved it was based on Japanese ancestry. Smooth.

LOL. Many people realize that it was the fact that several people of Japanese ancestry had immediately aided an Imperial Japanese soldier when the chance arose, which makes the Niihau incident important.

Did you ever notice that successful lawyers seem to have very little time for squawking nonsense on the internet? Unless that is their job, of course.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

TheLongTermerToday  07:29 am JST

Any country who has been attacked has the right, and will, investigate insular communities whos alignment and allegiance is with the attacker. that could be muslim or Japananese or whoever. the elephant in the room your ignoring is that the country had just been attacked and suffered many deaths from that, and the same enemy wanted to expand their empire to include Hawaii Alaska and the west coast.

oh really, why then jJapanese Americans were in prisoned 10 to 1 , compare to Italian or Germans?

it was all fake news, no Japanese Americans help Japanese military,

don't tell me you have right to lock up anybody, people like you created a mess in middle east, taking out one leader after another, hope things will get better,

is it better now in Iraq, Syria, ?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

John RichardsonFeb. 17  11:24 pm JST

its unfortunate but they had no choice back then. there were so many ninja japanese spies within those communities gathering and stealing info I am sure. they were taking precautions putting them in those camps. those groups should understand, and also consider the people who were murdered on Pearl Harbor by a sneak attack.

can you give me one documented proof that Ninjas were in U.S soil spying for Japanese Military? not fake news or propaganda, but actually proof of arrest and prosecution.

What type of sake do you drink at home?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

@fillimore,

David Lowman has already done the research for us, in his book "Magic" many excellent proofs and evidence for your review. I suggest you take a look at the cables he provided.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

From slavery, genocide of Native Americans, land grab from Mexico, Vietnam war, Iran Contra, invasion of Iraq, Japanese American internment camps/prison and many more events, US has color history of abuse and down right genocidal tendencies, I wouldn't try to sugar coat it , just admit when you are wrong and move on. you can't sugar coat history....

5 ( +7 / -2 )

i don't read ultra right books which has no vaild points but just more racist garbage.

so you can telling me you have no proof , just some ultra right guy making claims, in your windows, and etc.

yes, Beaver, there were no Ninjas in California so please go to sleep.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

TheLongTermerFeb. 17  08:21 pm JST

Americans in German POW camps fared far better than any in a Japanese camp.

POWs have nothing to do with this issue. The article is about civilian non-combatant American citizens living in the United States who were deprived of their constiututional rights. Again, the inability to descern the difference exposes the "they all look the same" ignorant prejudice that caused this mistaken action, albeit in hindsight, to be taken.

extankerToday  03:08 am JST

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niihau_incident

I'm not saying in any way that the internment was the right thing to do, but fear is a powerful motivator and there was much more to it than just saying everyone was racist.

The problem with using the Niihau incident as a reason to support the internment of all Japanese-Americans is that it would be equivalent to rounding up and imprisoning all Muslim Americans because of 911. Racism usually comes out riding on the wave of real fears, be they economic or, as we see today with contageous disease. That anti-Japanese racism existed on the West Cost well prior to 1941 is historically documented and even legalized by immigration exclusion laws. Post WWII investigations showed that there were no acts of espionage or sabotage carried out against the US by the J-A population. Furthermore, Hawaii, where the Niihau incident occured never even had to put their J-A citizens into internment camps. We have the benefit of hindsight to see the errors that were made and as a nation should have the courage to face up to them to ensure that we don't repeat them. The easiest way to repeat a mistake is to deny that you made one the first time.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

The easiest way to repeat a mistake is to deny that you made one the first time.

you just posted a whole lot about nothing. when a country is attacked. all of that you posted is no longer a priority. It was proven there were japanese americans who were supporting the empire of japan.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

If only sanctuary cities had been in place in 1941, eh, Governor Newsom?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Sneezy: “We learned nothing: there are concentration camps on the border now.”

”Concentration camps”? Please define. The term is inflammatory as you well know. The association for the past 75 years has been with Nazi death camps. No, there are none of those on the border.

Nice try. No cigar.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

About time. California legislators also apologized to others in the past with as Native Americans, Latino Americans, and Chinese Americans.

I've also seen people make ludicrous comparisons in regards to not only this apology, but the compensation of internees back in the 1980's.

One such comparison being, Japan has 'never' apologized for its past so why should America apologize to internees. First of all, Japan has apologized numerous times for its last conduct to multiple nations. Second, the internees were Americans of Japanese descent, and had no relevance to Imperial Japan and its wartime actions.

Another ludicrous comparison made is that America has not apologized for slavery so why apologize to Japanese (conveniently leaving out the Americans part).

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

OssanAmerica - The problem with using the Niihau incident as a reason to support the internment of all Japanese-Americans is that it would be equivalent to.....

Interesting claim, but there is no problem. "All Japanese-Americans" were not interned. You can chose to ignore the Dec 7th, 1941 Niihau incident, but that doesn't mean it didn't happen. Or that elected leaders in various U.S. governments, leaders in U.S. military forces, or the people running shipping, and ship building in the San Diego area weren't aware that a few, or some, people with Japanese ancestry had chosen so quickly to aid a U.S. enemy.

Given the times (1940s), the unannounced attack, the general uncertainty, the rumors, the fears, and the rush to prepare to meet a suspected enemy attack, a decision was made to move potential enemies away from U.S. military ports, and installations. At that point in time, it was decided that Japanese-Americans would receive treatment similar to suspect German-Americans until their loyalty was no longer in question. For one thing, the heroic actions of the all-Nisei, U.S. Army 442nd Regimental Combat Team fighting Nazis in Europe helped many overcome some doubts of Japanese-American loyalty.

California should apologize. For lots of things. Homelessness, hollyweird, stealing water from neighbor states, gangbangers, sanctuary cities, etc.. If todays Californians wish to apologize for 1940s Californians, that's fine by me.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I know and totally understand from our perspective it doesn't look good. But you have to remember the mind set back then. It was totally different to now.

The Japanese had attacked the US and killed 1000s and the US had no experience of this before. It was WAR, it wasn't business as usual!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

there is no excuse for putting American born & raised citizens in prison for actions of Japan. You try to give so many reasons and excuses , sugarcoating it and once and twice, it was pure racism period.

Don't make excuses for past mistakes, same types of people would put 1000s of Muslims in prisons after 9/11. whether 1940s or 2001.

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On February 19, 1942, Franklin D Roosevelt (Democrat) issued Executive Order 9066, which led to the forced relocation of approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast. They stripped them of everything (homes, jobs, personal belongings, businesses, etc. ) More than 2/3 of them were American Citizens.

President Ronald Reagan (Republican) signed into law the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 which apologized for the internment on behalf of the U.S. government and authorized a payment of $20,000 to each camp survivor.

Just some facts of the Japanese Internment. Food for thought.

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You try to give so many reasons and excuses , sugarcoating it and once and twice, it was pure racism period.

Absolutely.

As I said earlier, the majority of Americans realize this but you'll always have a few trying to justify these camps.

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As I said earlier, the majority of Americans realize this but you'll always have a few trying to justify these camps.

Explaining that it was not just 'pure racism' that led to the interment camps, is not the same as trying to justify them.

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Living in or even being born in a country doesn’t necessarily result in loyalty.

A quick look at the UK today will show you that a substantial number of muslims born and raised in the UK join terrorist networks against UK interests. Of course I’m not suggesting the internment of all UK born Pakistanis.

However, during war time, it makes perfect sense to lock up those connected to the enemy. The UK did it with Germans. Germany to UK nationals.

I have lived more than half my life in Japan but have no loyalty to Japan what so ever.

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I wasn't alive then, didn't live through it, but we have in-laws who were in the camps. One of them enlisted and fought in Europe. These camps were far better than what civilians went through in Japanese or German camps. By 1943 the internees were being asked to relocate outside the camps, back into civilian life.

It seems strange to me that the Supreme Allied Commander in the European Theater was an American of German descent, Eisenhower, while people of Japanese descent were feared and interned. It is difficult to imagine someone in a position of authority in the Pacific area of operations who was of Japanese descent.

There are of course many anecdotes from that time. There was the case of a Japanese-American living in a small town in the state of New Mexico. He was ordered to relocate to an internment camp. The mayor and chief of police wrote a letter to the federal government asking that he not be interned, as he was such a valuable member of the community. President Franklin Roosevelt personally intervened to say that he did not have to be interned. I don't remember the details, like the name of the town, but memorable. Brave, good people can make a difference.

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TheLongTermerFeb. 18  08:57 pm JST

The easiest way to repeat a mistake is to deny that you made one the first time.

you just posted a whole lot about nothing. when a country is attacked. all of that you posted is no longer a priority. It was proven there were japanese americans who were supporting the empire of japan.

So why don't you post actual cases of acts by Japanese Americans agauinst the United States during WII? So far you've posted nothing but your forced denial of US responsibility by insisting that Japanese-Americans were enemies of the U.S.

Do I need to educate you about:

"During the early years of World War II, Japanese Americans were forcibly relocated from their homes in the West Coast because military leaders and public opinion combined to fan unproven fears of sabotage. As the war progressed, many of the young Nisei, Japanese immigrants' children who were born with American citizenship, volunteered or were drafted to serve in the United States military. Japanese Americans served in all the branches of the United States Armed Forces, including the United States Merchant Marine.[1] An estimated 33,000 Japanese Americans served in the U.S. military during World War II, of which 20,000 joined the Army. Approximately 800 were killed in action.

The 100th/442nd Infantry Regiment became the most decorated unit in U.S. military history.[2] The related 522nd Field Artillery Battalion liberated the infamous Dachau concentration camp. Other Japanese-American units also included the 100th Infantry Battalion, the Varsity Victory Volunteers, and the Military Intelligence Service."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese-American_service_in_World_War_II

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arrestpaulFeb. 19  08:05 am JST

OssanAmerica - The problem with using the Niihau incident as a reason to support the internment of all Japanese-Americans is that it would be equivalent to.....

Interesting claim, but there is no problem. "All Japanese-Americans" were not interned. 

Yes, those who proclaimed loyalty to Japan were deported, which is normal. So which Japanese-Americans who were US citizens born in the US who declared allegiance to the United States were "not interned"? As far as I am aware the only ones not interned were those who served in the US military armed forces.

Also, please tell me what "incidents" are documented where Japanese-Americans acted against the United States after the Niihau incident.

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OssanAmerica - So why don't you post actual cases of acts by Japanese Americans agauinst the United States during WII?

Before, or after, the internment? It should be obvious that acts of sabotage would have been very difficult, if not impossible, after the internment.

Just to be clear, WWII was a long time ago. We are discussing history from a different time. Currently, the U.S. people and Japanese are good friends, and trading partners. The Imperial Japan mindset is gone. Mistakes were made by all sides back then, and things are better now, 75 years later.

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