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Canadian Mounties to allow Muslim officers to wear hijab

12 Comments
By ROB GILLIES

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12 Comments
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Being an atheist, I prefer my cops to be secular. Keeping religion at bay is behind the West's vast accomplishments over the past couple of hundred years.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Hijabs are fine to some look really nice with different colours western women used to cover up their hair as well but burkas is were I draw the line those really have no place in modern secular society.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Funny how liberal atheists who are usually all over Christianity give Islam a free pass.

I'm as critical of the fallacy of Christianity as I am of the fallacy of Islam. Believing in a god defies logic.

But I'd be just as critical of those who discriminate against Christians for being Christian as I am of those who discriminate against Muslims for being Muslims.

We just don't see that bigotry against Christians these days in the same levels we see it against Muslims though.

So it's not about discriminating against Christians and giving Muslims a pass. Both Christians and Muslims have a right to believe what they want. I'll ridicule that belief though, while protecting their right to believe it.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Julie Gagnon, a spokeswoman for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, said the organization developed a special hijab but said no officer is wearing it as no members have requested to wear the hijab on duty since the policy was officially adopted in January. She said offering female Muslim officers the choice to wear it reflects the diversity of the force’s workforce. It’s unclear how many Muslim officers the Mounties have.

so it is an empty gesture.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

As long as you can see their entire face and so does not interfere in the performance of their duties, AND does not allow them anything special, there is nothing necessarily wrong here.

So long as they understand this is a privilege, and not a right.

The bonus, of course, is the religious feel part of secular society.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"Both Christians and Muslims have a right to believe what they want."

This isn't about their personal beliefs. It's about being allowed to display items that symbolize a religion -- while performing duties of a government authority. By the same standard, Catholic cops and civil servants should be allowed to wear red capes with large crucufixes on chains....the garb of the Spanish Inquisition.

But they'll be a snowball in Hades before that's allowed. Yet another skewed double standard by our friends from the regressive left.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This isn't about their personal beliefs. It's about being allowed to display items that symbolize a religion -- while performing duties of a government authority.

A quick google shows me Canada has freedom of religion: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_religion_in_Canada

And it specifically says this:

Canadians are therefore free to have their own beliefs and opinions, are free to practise religion or refrain, and are free to establish media organizations with or without religious content.

And:

While religious freedoms are protected from state interference by the Charter, the actions of private individuals are largely governed by the provincial human rights codes. These codes prohibit discrimination in the marketplace, accommodation, and employment on the grounds of a variety of personal characteristics, including religion.

And:

In 1995, the Federal Court of Appeal upheld the exemption for Sikhs from wearing the "Mountie hat" as part of the RCMP dress requirements.

It would appear that under Canadian law, while performing duties of a government authority, it has been legally established that members have the right to display items that symbolize a religion.

By the same standard, Catholic cops and civil servants should be allowed to wear red capes with large crucufixes on chains....the garb of the Spanish Inquisition.

Maybe, but does anyone actually want to do that?

they'll be a snowball in Hades before that's allowed.

If it were to be allowed anywhere, it would be in Canada, which seems a hell of a lot more enlightened on these matters than other countries.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Strangerland

" it has been legally established that members have the right to display items that symbolize a religion."

Yeah, but they don't.

http://news.nationalpost.com/holy-post/b-c-pastafarian-fights-for-a-drivers-license-and-religious-freedom-with-a-spaghetti-colander-on-his-head

0 ( +0 / -0 )

1) That article has nothing to do with the police

2) I fully support the pastafarian movement. It's a great thing for pointing out the illogicality of religion.

But that said, it's a joke, it's not a real religion. How do I know? Same way I know what love is. I can't put it in words, but I definitely know it when I see it.

You'll notice in the article that you linked to that it says this:

Here in one of the most religiously diverse communities in Canada, it is possible to obtain a driver’s license wearing a kipa, hijab, habit, turban or Amish cap — really, any piece of religious headgear that does not obscure the face.

As you can see, real religions do have the right to wear their headgear.

You pulled out an article about a guy from a fringe group that is parodying religion in an attempt to show that people that belong to real religions don't have protection of law for their headgear, except that the very article you pulled out does indeed point out that they have protection of law for their headgear.

... for driver's license pictures. The article has nothing to do with the police.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

so it is an empty gesture.

Offering inclusion is not an empty gesture. It shows Muslim colleagues that they are part of the group, not an enemy force.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

My only question is, will the officer be safe. Does it have any potential for putting her at a higher risk in a confrontation with a bad guy? Im not referring to religious issues although that could be a factor setting off the confrontation. Im thinking about basics like hearing and seeing threat to her and her comrades. Is this something that can break away if the bad guy grabs it or will this put her a greater risk. I suppose the RCMP has thought of this, at least I hope they have and not been pressured into responding to a poorly thought out and implemented instruction from the Trudeau Government. Hopefully this a benign policy without repercussions.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Good on them. France using the polar opposite with even private lives, and pres tel who keeps getting attacked?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

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