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CEOs to Trump: Jobs exist; skills don't

36 Comments
By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER

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But he said that in his experience, most students coming out of high school lack the math and English skills to absorb technical manuals.

Uh oh, The Republican president who can't even remember how many electoral votes he got and who speaks in word salad has to improve Americans' math and English skills...

Not to worry, DeVos is on the case! No doubt their proficiency will skyrocket. Or maybe their growth, this administration always gets those confused. But whatever, the point is, it's going to be yuge! Bigly.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

Trump showed his lack of knowledge in yet another subject, this time manufacturing. His understanding of manufacturing probably comes from what he's been told by his fleet of accountants and lawyers about how much it costs his companies to make their products in overseas sweatshops. Not American.

And given his privileged upbringing and the fact that he's always been so far removed from everyday Americans, it's no surprise that he wasn't aware that many American workers lack the skills needed to meet modern industry needs.

And his choice of DeVos showed clearly he has no understanding of public education and worse no regard for it.

5 ( +12 / -7 )

I love all this liberal hate. Too funny.

Uh oh, The Republican president who can't even remember how many electoral votes he got and who speaks in word salad has to improve Americans' math and English skills...

Could be worse. Could be a highly college professor that talks and talks and talks and talks and then.....nothing happens, we went through that already and got nothing out of it, but debt and division and lack of employment opportunities.

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

I recall when Walmart stocked American-made goods in preference to foreign-made goods. After Sam died, that changed.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

The skills debate is common diversion from corporations, usually regurgitated without skepticism by the media. Left unsaid is that these CEOs like the status quo, paying small wages in poor countries that lack labor or environmental standards. I remain skeptical about Trump's ability to fix what ails the American economy but anything would be an improvement on neoliberal consensus that has united both parties for decades now.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Obama already brought manufacturing back, but it's hard to create jobs when they are so quickly being replaced by automation.

And at some point they have to realize that cutting taxes and investing in education can't be done at the same time. Usually the GOP cuts taxes and promises growth, the growth doesn't come, there's a hole blasted in the budget, and education is just too easy to steal from to make up the difference.

Tax cuts helped fuel a $250 million cut to the Wisconsin university system and reduced budgets for every grade under. In Kansas they had to end the school year early because they simply ran out of money after massive budget cuts totaling over $150 million. Louisiana is going to slash education funding after Jindal's anti-tax stance created another massive hole.

The good news is that the rich got tax cuts. Oh, and that growth will be coming any day now. Trust us.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

CEOs to Trump: Jobs exist; skills don't

Correction:

CEOs on Trump: Job exists; skills don't

4 ( +6 / -2 )

With the "Dumbing Down" of the average student around these parts( USA) I agree with these C.E.O.'s- so lets begin the training and get to work .

2 ( +4 / -2 )

They are kind of right, in as much as being good at Twitter and blathering half cooked notions to adoring crowds are skills that are worth almost nothing, which is what Trump insists he's getting paid for the next four years (nevermind the billion dollar security tab). Somehow, I have a hard time believing a career businessman wants to work this hard for nothing, but oh well.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Could be worse. Could be a highly college professor that talks and talks and talks and talks and then.....nothing happens, we went through that already and got nothing out of it, but debt and division and lack of employment opportunities.

Nothing happened because of a do nothing and good for nothing GoP congress and senate. Employment cratered with the financial crisis, and that crisis created a lot of debt, which if didn't exist would have resulted in even worse employment rates.

It is worse when the president (Trump) cannot understand the underlying problem let alone the problem, and then he appoints people too dumb (Devos) to do anything more than promote private religious schools, which is designed to prosthelytize and make money all in one neat package.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

CEOs to Trump: Jobs exist; skills don't

All the more reason to allow, inject and naturalize highly skilled & educated immigrants into the U.S. to give a much needed boost to the economy and education. If the best ones want in, let 'em in.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

This is what happens when kids study sociology, intercultural relations, and political science. More focus on tech, manu, and trades in schools is a must.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Is there a labour shortage in America, or just a skills shortage? If there's no labour shortage, I don't understand what these companies are complaining about besides not wanting to raise wages. If there is a labour shortage, then these so called CEOs should have brought this issue up with Trump. Either way, I don't see any unsolvable issues here

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Manufacturing jobs and wages will decline around the world as robots take over. Not sure why Trump wants to bring a shrinking source of employment back to the USA.

I was also hoping he would just eliminate the Dept. of Education. Since it was established it has burned through tax dollars to make the most ignorant "educated" generations the country has ever seen. Leave education the the state and local decision makers. If there is a skills shortage, local schools can react and train new workers while Washington DC is still drawing up the paperwork.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Not sure why Trump wants to bring a shrinking source of employment back to the USA.

He's over 70, an aging baby boomer who wants a return to the 1950s. Big auto, big oil, big coal, big manufacturing. His business knowledge seems limited to real estate development and ponzi schemes

His attitude toward states rights is also back to the 1950s, the days of separate but equal. If you're not familiar, click this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qk1tTCk2Kks

And now he wants to get the feds to go after states that have legalized marijuana. Trump doesn't seem to be guided by principles; it's all about contingencies. His lack of plans is going to cost Americans in every way possible.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Your first paragraph may be right.

Your second paragraph makes no sense at all, equating state's rights with racism is a straw man that completely avoids addressing the merits of state rights.

Your last paragraph has no evidence to back it up at all so far as the marijuana issue.

So far as principles, I agree Trump doesn't have a coherent set of them. Unlike other politicians, who are smart enough to pretend they have principles (all of which are for sale). Either way, Americans will eventually have to pay for decades of corruption and mismanagement, no matter who is president.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Your second paragraph makes no sense at all, equating state's rights with racism is a straw man that completely avoids addressing the merits of state rights.

I encourage you to read up on segregation - i.e. racism - in the US in the 1950s and how states rights were used to justify it. It took federal intervention to stop governors from having local police departments turn their batons and German Shepherds on citizens. Among other hideous things. Doesn't Nashi have info on that?

Your last paragraph has no evidence to back it up at all so far as the marijuana issue.

I beg to differ. Trump and the reactionaries want to limit it, which will take away jobs, decrease tax revenues, and increase police costs. Big pharma, big tobacco, big alcohol - 1950s redux. The only modern thing is Trump and the reactionaries want more private jails. So now add big jail.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/trump-might-be-coming-for-your-weed-231515133.html

1 ( +2 / -1 )

That is a common refrain always heard from CEO's - "not enough skilled workers." I heard the same thing from CEO's of big tech companies. Of course they neglected to mention that they fire skilled American technicians to replace them with ones from India, paying them a lot less and threatening to revoke their company-sponsored green cards if they ask for more money or want to change jobs and work for another company. Why pay Americans more than they can pay allegedly "skilled workers" from some third-world country? Might cut into their profits.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@ A Realist - this is a big issue. Very large U.S. companies have done this or are doing this. This includes Disney, Southern California Edison, Facebook, Google, etc. The abuse of the H1B visa programs are extreme and it really impacts the families of U.S. citizens drastically and also results in potential exploitation of foreign workers. This abuse comes from both conservatives and liberals and is one reason there is such a huge support from Silicon Valley for not changing the way immigration to the U.S. is currently dealt with (that is keep the status quo of ignoring the issue of illegal immigration or visa abuse). The one things these people do want is more leniency and a higher volume of H1B visas so they can lower their costs and make more profits.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

That is a common refrain always heard from CEO's

These are real CEOs (like Bill Gates) and not business flops like Trump. They know what they are doing (unlike Trump). And they (unlike Trump) would also make decent presidents.

Imagine Donald Trump vs. Bill Gates.

they can pay allegedly

Trump doesn't even pay his workers in the first place- and needs to be sued in court for it. Trump voters are so naive they think that Trump will bring iPhone manufacturing to the US.

Where does Ivanka have her shoes made?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@Nishikat - you brought out one good point. Trump is hypocritical when it comes to running his own businesses. This is similar to some of the Climate Change supporters flying around in private jets while trying to promote climate change and a regressive global climate tax.

In this case Trump does indeed need to start walking the walk if he wants to talk the talk of job creation in the U.S. He could gain alot of support by announcing he and his family's businesses will from this day forward manufacture all products domestically.

But I doubt this will happen.

Politicians and the elite feel that they need to tell others how to live or what to do, but they refuse to walk the line in their own lives. I guess one reason I do not really support either of the two "main" parties in the U.S.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

“The jobs are there, but the skills are not"

Trump (thinking to himself between tweets): "Oh, crap. And I just put that Devos donor person in charge of educating the next generation of Americans, didn't I? Damn. This is way harder than I thought."

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I encourage you to read up on segregation - i.e. racism - in the US in the 1950s and how states rights were used to justify it.

And it's still a straw man. States rights will become more prominent in the coming decades. People justify all kinds of horrible things. May as well ban religion, communism, democracy, as they have all been used as excuses for atrocities. Bringing up racism is just a way of avoiding discussing state's right in any rational way.

Trump and the reactionaries want to limit it, which will take away jobs, decrease tax revenues, and increase police costs. Big pharma, big tobacco, big alcohol - 1950s redux.

And you know this how exactly?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

LFRAgainFEB. 24, 2017 - 02:57PM JST Trump (thinking to himself between tweets): "Oh, crap. And I just put that Devos donor person in charge of educating the next generation of Americans, didn't I? Damn. This is way harder than I thought."

Let's be realistic: this is Trump after all we're talking about. If he was thinking about anything at all during that meeting, it was most likely about which beauty pageant dressing rooms he can force himself into as President and whether or not his executive powers include the ability to order underlings to give him golden showers.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@commanteer >Bringing up racism is just a way of avoiding discussing state's right in any rational way.

It's clear you're not from the US and probably haven't studied US history and learnt what's been done to minority cultures in the name of states rights. A bit of research might help in understanding what 'separate but equal' meant in the era of states rights. For a start, check the video link I sent. Bringing up racism is core to understanding problems with states rights.

@PT Trump and the reactionaries want to limit it, which will take away jobs, decrease tax revenues, and increase police costs. Big pharma, big tobacco, big alcohol - 1950s redux.

@Commonashi And you know this how exactly?

Strictly conjecture. However, the primary monetary contributors to anti-legalization campaigns have been big pharma, big tobacco and big alcohol, in addition to big religion. Oligarchs in those industries don't like competition.

The states that have legalized marijuana have seen new many jobs created, new revenues for local and state government, and reductions in law enforcement and judicial costs. The police and judges in these states can focus on crimes other than those that are pot related.

Here's more conjecture: Trump and the reactionaries want more private jails. Jails need criminals. If pot is criminalized once again, the courts could sentence them to jail time. Big win for big jail. Plus easy-peasy for the private jails: pot smokers tend to be pretty laid back.

Again, Trump and the reactionaries are all over the board on states rights, but that's what to be expected when the current leaders of the US are a-principled.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This is what happens when kids study sociology, intercultural relations, and political science. More focus on tech, manu, and trades in schools is a must.

Now you know it takes students on average 5 to 6 years to graduate from universities.

He's over 70, an aging baby boomer who wants a return to the 1950s.

Hillary is almost the same age, but with none of the business experience, which Trump has.

Big auto, big oil, big coal, big manufacturing. His business knowledge seems limited to real estate development and Ponzi schemes.

Ponzi schemes? I guess when Trump was a Dem just a few short years ago, the left didn't care about all that. My, my, how times have changed, but sadly, not the left.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

but with none of the business experience, which Trump has.

If you wanted business experience Bill Gates would be a better choice (and he was considered running mate for the Dems). Imagine Trump vs. Gates and Gates would be the clear winner x50 Billion.

One thing is Trump will be good for ladder sales when he builds his wall (and Americans pay for it - not Mexicans) so maybe his business experience counts for something.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"Big auto, big oil, big coal, big manufacturing. His business knowledge seems limited to real estate development and Ponzi schemes."

"Ponzi schemes? I guess when Trump was a Dem just a few short years ago, the left didn't care about all that. My, my, how times have changed, but sadly, not the left."

Why would people care what a loudmouth TV celeb thought about politics? It was when he stepped into politics it rightly became an issue.

Some thought he was a vulgarian but later jumped on the bandwagon. There were also those who thought he knew nothing of substance but later jumped on the bandwagon. Others got really insulting, as bad as many liberals, and called his supporters a lunatic fringe before jumping on the bandwagon.

So, yes, times have changed.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It's clear you're not from the US and probably haven't studied US history ....Bringing up racism is core to understanding problems with states rights.

I am and I have. Very familiar with it. You are taking a narrow historical event and using it to frame a much wider discussion of states rights. Your argument implies that states, if left to their own devices, would revert back to the racism of the 60s. That's absurd. The states rights defence wasn't even valid when it was used. It certainly isn't an excuse to strip the states of their constitutional rights and concentrate all power in the hands of Washington DC. Though, I see where that argument is a very convenient one for politicians who want to keep the power all in their own hands.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It certainly isn't an excuse to strip the states of their constitutional rights and concentrate all power in the hands of Washington DC.

That's not even close to what I'm saying; you've stretched my point to an extreme. My fear, extreme as it might be, is a return to the days of Wallace, Faubus and other white nationalist state leaders. The Washington vs Jefferson argument is one that will never be settled, nor should it be. The tension needs to always be there; there needs to be flexibility.

Though, I see where that argument is a very convenient one for politicians who want to keep the power all in their own hands.

With a megalomaniac like Trump in office, with a snake like Bannon pushing his policies while trying to stifle the media and any criticism of the new regime, and while they're trying to undermine the judiciary and handcuff intelligence agencies, I fear the White House is trying to take power in their own hands. And I also fear any governor doing the same.

And it's not absurd to fear a return to the racism of the 1950s. White nationalists are getting increasingly brazen.

http://www.newsday.com/opinion/editorial/hate-speech-and-donald-trump-1.12650102

1 ( +2 / -1 )

He could gain alot of support by announcing he and his family's businesses will from this day forward manufacture all products domestically.

I have seen some of the suits in the Donald Trump Collection on Amazon that are advertised as Made in America....but I really don't know an apparel company that both manufactures in the US and uses American textiles and fabrics in the process. Do you ?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Why would people care what a loudmouth TV celeb thought about politics?

Because he sounded like a human and NOT a politician.

It was when he stepped into politics it rightly became an issue.

Well, it became an issue when the left found out he could possibly win.

Some thought he was a vulgarian but later jumped on the bandwagon. There were also those who thought he knew nothing of substance but later jumped on the bandwagon. Others got really insulting, as bad as many liberals, and called his supporters a lunatic fringe before jumping on the bandwagon.

And there were many that felt wrong, naive and evolved and realized, he makes sense.

So, yes, times have changed.

For liberals, most definitely!

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

"Why would people care what a loudmouth TV celeb thought about politics?"

"Because he sounded like a human and NOT a politician."

What in the name of calling the poor morons and discriminatory renting policies are you CNNing about now? I was replying to your post about the days when Trump was a democrat.

"And there were many that felt wrong, naive and evolved and realized, he makes sense."

That mind-boggling sentence furthers my theory that to minds that are wired differently, Trump's inane gibberish sounds like Winston Churchill.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What in the name of calling the poor morons and discriminatory renting policies are you CNNing about now?

Please give up the humor attempt.

I was replying to your post about the days when Trump was a democrat.

I was aware of that.

That mind-boggling sentence furthers my theory that to minds that are wired differently, Trump's inane gibberish sounds like Winston Churchill.

And most of us are proud of it.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I have seen some of the suits in the Donald Trump Collection on Amazon that are advertised as Made in America

I see made in China. Made in the USA would means something very expensive.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Usually you hear the GOP say things like "he sounds like a real person" for the dense leaders in their party like George Bush, Sarah Palin, and Donald Trump. And it's usually said right after something stupid comes out of their mouths.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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