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Armed gangs free Muslim militants in Egypt

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Too bad the Egyptians don't want America's boy no more

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And i thought Greece was in trouble... It seems like there is a riot virus spreading around in all countries...

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When some people were dreaming of the "democracy domino" effect, wait for the "integrist taking over" effect. Sometime, a dictator keeping some kind of stability a la Sadam is somewhat better...

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This and what has/is happening in Tunisia and Yemen are amazing developments - popular uprisings - the French Revolution of the 21st century.

It seems like the govt. overthrow in Tunisia has inspired the Egyptians. And a total Internet shutdown in Egypt - all 4 main Internet service providers apparently forced by the govt. to suspend services - wow. A major concern, of course, is who is going to replace these quasi-dictators.

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A leaked U.S. diplomatic memo said Gamal and his clique of ruling party stalwarts and businessmen were gaining confidence in 2007 about controlling power in Egypt and that they believed that Mubarak would eventually dump Suleiman, who was seen as a threat by Gamal and his coterie of aides.

Thank you Mr. Assange for your wikileaks fiasco (sarcism intended). I wonder how many other revolts and changes we will see because of this man.

I am not silly enough to say that it was all his fault, I know that things have been brewing in Egypt for a long time, but those cables sure helped to get things started.

Too bad the Egyptians don't want America's boy no more

Why is it that China can get away with backing cut throat leaders in places like Africa and NK, to get the resourcs that it wants,; but then if the US backs a dictator, we are just being puppet masters?

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Why is it that China can get away with backing cut throat leaders in places like Africa and NK, to get the resourcs that it wants,; but then if the US backs a dictator, we are just being puppet masters?

So you equate America with China? So much for being exceptional.

Anyway, America has supported dictators, like Mubarak and worse, all my life and well before you and I were born. So stop feeling sorry for yourself.

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but then if the US backs a dictator, we are just being puppet masters?

Actually, the US and Israel is engineering this "revolt" to install Mohammed El Baradei as leader.

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Anyway, America has supported dictators, like Mubarak and worse, all my life and well before you and I were born.

Yes, and back during the Gamal Nasser days, the Americans supported the Islamists as a way of undermining the rising Arab nationalism of the 50's and 60's. The United States foreign policy usually blows up in its face. The best path is neutrality, but that is politically impossible today in the United States when the Middle East is concerned.

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BEFORE this episode of unrest were other countries like Japan, Australia, Canada, England, and Europe demanding Mubarak step down?

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SushiSake:

" This and what has/is happening in Tunisia and Yemen are amazing developments - popular uprisings - the French Revolution of the 21st century. "

The French Revolution was inspired by secularists, not by religious fanatics. Read history.

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No.

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SushiSake:

"No" to what? To reading history? I am not surprised.

Fact is, the comparison between the French Revolution against the Louis XVI and the Egypt revolution against the secular government is ludicrious.

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And it might surprise some of you that the EU has aided Egypt annually and is planning give 446 million euros ($607 million) over the next two years. And the European nations have also sold arms in the past. So is this also propping up the dictator? Anyway, my point is plenty of blame to go around.

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Chaos

coming to a global neighborhood near you.

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paulinusa:

" And the European nations have also sold arms in the past. So is this also propping up the dictator? "

Yes, it is. And it is necessary in the Middle East. Because a dictatorship is the only way to keep a country like Egypt relatively secular. With the removal of the dictator, the religious extremists will take over and establish their theocracy.

You have seen it in Iran and Iraq -- how many re-plays to you wish for?

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WilliB: I don't disagree as to why Mubarak has been in power for so long. The world held their noses and supported him to keep the status quo. However, I do disagree with you that this is strictly a religious uprising. There might be elements of that but I don't think it's the predominant reason.

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paulinusa: BEFORE this episode of unrest were other countries like Japan, Australia, Canada, England, and Europe demanding Mubarak step down?

I think you're going to find that statements like that will be met with a resounding YAWN. People are going to use this situation to criticize who they want to criticize, and people just don't really feel like criticizing those countries. No matter how the situation plays out in Egypt, no matter what decisions the US makes, the facts will simply be reorganized to create the greatest amount of criticism possible for the US.

If you're anti-Israeli the set of facts you'll use will be different but they will point to harsh criticism of Israel. If you want to make Islam look bad then you're going to bring up points that paint Islam in the worst possible light. People are even using the issue to attack Democrats or Republicans depending on who you want to listen to. It's all about "How can I use this situation to attack my rivals?"

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As I said,most everyone held their nose and (in one way or another)supported Mubarak to keep the status quo.

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most everyone held their nose and (in one way or another)supported Mubarak to keep the status quo

. However, I do disagree with you that this is strictly a religious uprising. There might be elements of that but I don't think it's the predominant reason.

I agree with you on both points. While America may face criticism, fairly or unfairly, it's inevitable given its power and influence. Why some cry about it while China doesn't is beyond me (China does make the existential claims that America does for starters).

I have read reports (BBC I think) that indicate that the Islamic Brotherhood were, like everyone else, caught flatfooted - this is an encouraging sign.

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So you equate America with China? So much for being exceptional.

So when one says that the US is exceptional in that it is the only superpower and has been fighting for democracy and freedom for many years that is bad; yet when one brings out the fact that the US is doing no more than any other country would in supporting a dictator, now we get to hear that "America means more than tha."

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I saw on youtube a supposed "shot protester" video as recorded by protesters. The way the guy fell after supposedly being shot from what sounded like a high powered rifle is total ass at best. he folded over nicely and slumped to the turf when really he would have been blown backward of his feet in a mist of blood. Looks like the Egyptian protesters are trying their hand at Pallywood (Fake Palestinian vids).

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"The French Revolution was inspired by secularists, not by religious fanatics. Read history."

Good point. This is not the French Revolution. it was a ludicrous analogy.

This is probably just politics as usual in the Arab and Maghreb world, unless Iran is also active behind the scenes, like they are in Lebanon.

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paulinusa:

" However, I do disagree with you that this is strictly a religious uprising. There might be elements of that but I don't think it's the predominant reason. "

It might not be the dominant reason now, but you can be sure that the Muslim Brotherhood will work its way to the top when the lid is taken off. Just look at Iran and Iraq to see what happens if you introduce "freedom" in these societies.

Already, the islamists world-wide are celebrating this. You think they are stupid?

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Egypt's problem is the same one facing Yemen, Palestine and other Mohammedan nation states - too many ppl, too many young men with out enough jobs :Egypt's population is approaching 84 million. It has doubled in the last third of a century. Latest UN population projection- Egypt hits 130 million at 2050.

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Islam is incapable with democracy. There will be a democratic process towards forming a theocracy.

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I don't know how the US looks bad in this. They supported a stable government that had made peace with its neighbours and seem to be sitting on the sidelines now, not putting a finger on the scale.

@WilliB

The main cause of the French revolution was rising food prices, very similar.

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Egypt's wealth,gonna be shared more, via coming NEW EGYPT.

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The way the guy fell after supposedly being shot from what sounded like a high powered rifle is total ass at best. he folded over nicely and slumped to the turf when really he would have been blown backward of his feet in a mist of blood.

@bobbafett

You've been playing too many video games, or watching too many movies. When a person gets shot in real life, they don't fly through the air. The bullet from a high powered rifle, will pass right through. Even if that means shattering bone, which most likely will create a large exit wound. Think of it more like stabbing a knife into jelly, the jelly won't fly off the dish.

Although I will admit to not searching for, or wanting to watch that Youtube video. So, I'm just stating what I know about bullets passing through flesh, meat and bone.

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Come on rajakumar, you surely don't believe this! "Egypt's wealth,gonna be shared more, via coming NEW EGYPT."

Nice dream. The wealth goes into different hands, maybe, but never ends up in the hands of the masses. New greedy people take the place of the old ones...

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Hello Nandakandamanda, you may be right,you may be wrong. I may be right,or I may be wrong.

New greed people,will be the present poorer people.

It's good,if goddess of wealth shifts,from one party to another. Goddess of wealth,moves a lot.

Cycle of wealth,is a circle game. Just like China, nation was historically rich,then became poor,then in 2000s rich again.

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If Muslim Brotherhood is to take charge of Egypt it is best to compare them to an Islamic political party which was formed from the Muslim Brotherhood. Hamas. Hamas have always maintained that the Palestinian people are the ones who have the final say on these issues by means of democratic elections. In fact both Hamas and Hezbollah are indeed the 2 most democratic movements in the Middle East. But the irony here is that they are labeled as terrorists in the context of neocolonialism’s racist campaign focused on Muslims and Islam. Hamas won mainly because of it´s strong opposition to corruption. This is what Muslim Brotherhood also can do to win the majority in Egypt if there is be held free elections.

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At least the military had the insight to secure the real wealth of Egypt. They secured the pyramids and the antiquties. I would hate for those treasures to wind up in the hands of the "really wealthy" people to be hidden as their personal treasur.

Egypt's wealth,gonna be shared more, via coming NEW EGYPT.

I doubt it, when the dust settles, I imagine and they get their new government, I bet they will wish for the "good old days" under Mubarak. Where was the movement for reforms these past 30 years. Surely the people of Egypt would not have so suppressed as to not even at least have their voices heard. Egypt for the most part is a secular Muslim nation. Yes conditions may have been bad, but why did they choose now to riot.

Did they ever talk with the government for change, or could it be that the government knew exactly who was behind these movements and stifled it. After all, as Iraq and Afg has shown, you can still have elections and rig the outcome.

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"The French Revolution was inspired by secularists, not by religious fanatics. Read history."

Good point. This is not the French Revolution. it was a ludicrous analogy.

Why not compare it to the French Revolution? The main issue seems to be living conditions for a vast majority of the people who have little to no say in government. This isn't some kind of Islamic takeover anymore than it's a criminal takeover. Some will find opportunities in the chaos, but it doesn't mean they are the driving force behind it.

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In fact both Hamas and Hezbollah are indeed the 2 most democratic movements in the Middle East. But the irony here is that they are labeled as terrorists in the context of neocolonialism’s racist campaign focused on Muslims and Islam. Hamas won mainly because of it´s strong opposition to corruption. This is what Muslim Brotherhood also can do to win the majority in Egypt if there is be held free elections.

Oh yeah Hamas so good. They used guns to take out the other guys in Gaza. They must be really democratic when they use guns. If an Islamist party gets the upper hand here we'll see more of the same. So much for religious democracy. The people will regret ousting Mubarak eventually when a Talibanish or Iranian style theocracy is in place.

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paultaylor:

" both Hamas and Hezbollah are indeed the 2 most democratic movements in the Middle East. "

How do you come up with stuff like this? The fact that Hamas and Hizb-Allah got lots of votes from their fanatical members does not make them any more democratic than the Nazi party in Germany, which also got voted into parliament.

If the Muslim Brotherhood takes power in Egypt, Egypot will be transformed into another radical Sharia state, with a religiously mandated goal to wipe Israel off the map. And replacing a modern constitution with Shariah is as far from "democracy" as you can get. Good grief.

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