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China demands U.S. drop Huawei extradition request with Canada

29 Comments
By Christopher Bodeen

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29 Comments
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Tohka, “Huawei is a business entity trading in the US, so the US has every reason to be going after a company that is alleged to have committed financial crimes / fraud/etc and so on.”

You are way far off the mark on this one. Huawei is a private Chinese company not listed in the US. It is not allowed to operate in the US for fear of being the leader of 5G technology. The US is using an anti-competition and suppression and using national securities as an excuse.

“As the CFO, allegations about fraud and misleading banks with sanctions makes her the absolute top of the food chain for something like this, and a splendid prime target.”

Those are only allegations, have not proven to be true. And, it is not against the laws in Canada. But even if it were true, it was based on solely on illegal sanctions against Iran which is not supported by the UN. It is a “long-arm jurisdiction,” a type of bully, disguising as legitimate and most of the people here are so gullible to believe. Imagine the consequences, business executives are longer safe to travel any more if every country would do the same especially China.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Is there politicking occurring here? Definitely. But to say they don't have jurisdiction is pretty laughable.

Thanks for the comment, and I reciprocate, but the main thing happening here is 'politicking'. The rest is a sideshow.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Sorry, the U.S does not negotiate with terrrorist

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

In less than two years Trump will be a footnote in the history books, and things can get back to normal.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why should China or Chinese companies be legally bound by what the US decides is legal or not?

Normally I find you to have reasonable arguments, but you're really far off the mark on this one.

Huawei is a business entity trading in the US, so the US has every reason to be going after a company that is alleged to have committed financial crimes / fraud/etc and so on.

As the CFO, allegations about fraud and misleading banks with sanctions makes her the absolute top of the food chain for something like this, and a splendid prime target.

Is there politicking occurring here? Definitely. But to say they don't have jurisdiction is pretty laughable.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

America should stop manipulating anyone better than them in real work. if Trump uses , his precious time to stop bully Asian brains & Asian companies maybe, his country can be great again. Being a bully and using people's children as pawns are not great. It is a down right low mentality of a money only bully. Trump knows America is not great anymore. In his many speeches to his citizens, he had used this statement. Lets make America great again.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Now is the time to cripple Huawei before 5G and push back against China

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@smithinjapan: you nailed it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

China's feeling the pressure from international demands to release the Canadians it has detailed and in one case sentenced to death, and this could be a way out. Could also benefit the US as it desperately seeks a Victory on the tariff issue which has helped see one of the worst results in US history with regard to tariffs. A little you scratch my back, I scratch yours. of course, they should NOT hand her over to China, but in all likelihood that's what will happen as it's a way for all parties to SLIGHTLY save face.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

The real motivation is not relevant.

Thanks for that, best laugh I've had all day.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Certain laws I disagree with, but if you violate them and visit a country that respects them, expect this. Meng should have stayed in China. A shot over the bow of the oligarchs is more important than the facts of this particular case.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

BigYenToday 10:42 am JST

You want to do business in the US, to deal in USD then yo go by the USA's rules

You think this is about "doing business in the US"? This is about US vs China, Super Heavyweight World Title bout. Collateral damage should be expecte

The real motivation is not relevant. Don't deal in USD you won't have issues, deal in EUR with Iran !

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I thought the Chinese were very much against meddling in the affairs of other countries? Now they are interfering in a legal matter between the US and Canada.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

You want to do business in the US, to deal in USD then yo go by the USA's rules

You think this is about "doing business in the US"? This is about US vs China, Super Heavyweight World Title bout. Collateral damage should be expected.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Agree with ChipStar. It's not a given that Canada would approve an extradition request from the USA and will simply hand over Ms Meng. The request needs to go through the Canadian justice system and the decision will be justified with a reason for all to see.

Just to play a little devil's advocate, Even before this case, Canada's high extradition rate has been criticized by some criminal justice reformers. Basically in Canada it is like a rubber stamp when one of our allies requests an arrest. In this particular case timing seemed political with the trade deal negotiations etc. but

just for further reading if people are interested.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/extradition-arrest-canada-diab-1.4683289

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I remember when “Fine China” was a phrase that meant quality and pride. Not anymore.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

(isn't it the same in China ?). 

No. There is no rule of law in China. The communist party can grab anything they want, whenever they want.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

She violated US law. She is facing US music. that's how it works..

And Kovrig and Spavor? Facing Chinese music? That's how it works too, buddy.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

BigYenToday 09:03 am JST

Why should China or Chinese companies be legally bound by what the US decides is legal or not?

You want to do business in the US, to deal in USD then yo go by the USA's rules (isn't it the same in China ?). Free to them to use Chinese entities, banks and currencies to deal with Iran.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

The world also doesn't exist to meet the USA's whims. People are concentrating on the relative merits of the two countries' judicial or political systems and not on the reason behind the arrest of Meng Wanzhou

Haajajajajajajajajaja..She violated US law. She is facing US music. that's how it works.. use US banks to evade sanctions and expect to get away with it.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

These Chinese princes are about to find out who the boss is. America will nuke them before they circumvent the rule of law.

Be Warned Chinese rich kids.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

The letter signed by academics and former diplomats said the arrests of the two will lead to "less dialogue and greater distrust, and undermine efforts to manage disagreements and identify common ground. Both China and the rest of the world will be worse off as a result."

Both Michaels were spies and they will pay with their years if the disputes keep going and as long as it takes!

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

It's called being held accountable, China. It's about time the world starts teaching you that actions have consequences and the world doesn't exists to meet China's whims.

The world also doesn't exist to meet the USA's whims. People are concentrating on the relative merits of the two countries' judicial or political systems and not on the reason behind the arrest of Meng Wanzhou - i.e. the US's attempted bullying of other countries into supporting its arbitrary and internationally unpopular decision to reimpose sanctions on Iran. Why should China or Chinese companies be legally bound by what the US decides is legal or not?

Actions have consequences? They sure do for Canada and for the two Canadians being held in China as victims of a game between superpowers.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

And if they don’t, then what?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

China is not getting this whole independent-justice-thing is it? We need to divest and support democracies instead

7 ( +12 / -5 )

Chinese Govt is killing a Canadian over this and holding 2 others on unpublished charges.

Is that a govt (China) the world should be supporting?

Does anyone outside the Chinese govt believe that the US charges against Meng Wanzhou don't have merit?

The US charges will be front-page news, along with the facts in the case as it is presented, assuming it goes to trial. If the facts don't warrant a trial, she will be released with at least 1 of her 13 passports.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

An example of grandstanding at its best!

Agree with ChipStar. It's not a given that Canada would approve an extradition request from the USA and will simply hand over Ms Meng. The request needs to go through the Canadian justice system and the decision will be justified with a reason for all to see.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

It's called being held accountable, China. It's about time the world starts teaching you that actions have consequences and the world doesn't exists to meet China's whims.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

China's funny. The judiciary of a third-party country with an actual justice system that is transparent will determine if the evidence warrants extradition.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

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