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Cockney rhyming slang to be used at London ATMs

18 Comments

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18 Comments
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Awesome. England has such a rich linguistic history so trying to keep it going is great. Keep up the wacky town names too, England!

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I'd love to take a butchers at this, guv!

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Oh goodness this has to be on topic someway or another!

http://www.whoohoo.co.uk/main.asp

"How are you today? i am looking forward to some nice tea"

Translates to......:

Wotcha. 'a 're ya today? I am lookin' forward ter sum sugar and spice Rosy Lee

Try it out. Its a laugh riot.

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Would you Adam & Eve it!

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Looks like a plie of pony to me. I'd like to get me German Bands on the James Blunt who thought this up. Give him a swift boot up the Nurembergs and take a cricket bat to his Alberts.

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I will definitely go to the ATM on eat your pie and die.

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Sounds like a load of Charlie Ollocks to me.

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classic. Cluedo. sweet jackanory.

What do you expect when you get paid a scuba diver an hour

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Cockney rhyming slnag originated so criminals could talk about bolags there were going to do , without any polce or nosey parkers understanding.

The origins have nothing to do with market traders darlings, though i notice they use it alot , especially at Bethnal Green.

My favourite is cushty made famous by Del Trotter, dating back to ncolonial India, regarding and easy job position. Oh i think the whole thing and the ATM's is wonderfully lovely, silly and one of the reasons i love Britain.

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Cockney rhyming slang was definitely connected to the East End markets. Most crooks in the East End used to have stalls in the markets as well and there was a seamless connection between the market traders and the thieves (most blagged goods would be sold on by mates in the street markets). You will hear cockney rhyming slang throughout all the London markets now, from Petticoat Lane up to Wembley market.

Del-boy Trotter on the TV show 'Only Fools and Horses' did not speak pure cockney rhyming slang and 'cushty' is not cockney rhyming slang (it is a modern London expression). The Trotters on the TV show were from Peckham in South London and their dialect was more of a modern London version.

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"and 'cushty' is not cockney rhyming slang (it is a modern London expression)"

I thought it was north east.

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I'm off for a Jodrell.

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Just as long as they don't do an ATM in the style of a strict old woman, who asks you what you're going to do with that money, and then says "Don't spend it all at once" at the end.

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Cushty is about 100 years old and is related to aneasy military posting overseas in India. It did not originate from North East or ONly Fools And Horses. Know what i mean? Lovely jubbly!

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The British!! What silly bunts!

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bushlover - the term you're after is "Berk". It's short for "Berkshire Hunt". You bowler.

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"trouble and strife" for wife"

Heh.

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Ivan: think Monty.

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