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Death toll from Egyptian violence rises to 638

14 Comments
By MAGGIE MICHAEL

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14 Comments
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Mr. Morsi ascent to being president of Egypt is considered generally fair by all international observer teams, including media contingents deployed during the elections. He won fair and square, albeit with a slim margin.

The huge demos in the capital against his rule is part of the democratic process as citizens want to flex and test its muscles in an era of newly found freedoms after decades of military rule. Nobody begrudges that until the military leaders hijacked the legit assemblies and took power unilaterally for themselves effectively pulling straight back their country into the abyss of dreaded military junta days.

I do not like my President either, and did not vote for him, but I shudder at the thought of unelected military leaders abrogating power to themselves.

The burning of Coptic Christians churches were dutifully, religiously being reported by major media outlets, BBC, Spiegel, Al Jazeera, including hosts of US based publications. They were unanimous in reporting that the burning were done as a consequence of the wanton carnage of protestors earlier, and points out apparent complicity of the current Coptic Pope in scheme of Mr. Morsi's downfall via coup d'etat.

Whenever possible, I always put my sympathy on the side of democracy. Whether citizens vote a foolish Islamist, or crazy Islamophobic, let it be, its their choice. There is always a cycle of airing grievances and, yes another elections. It's not a perfect rendition, but in essence that is how democracy works.

Otherwise, the option of coup d'etat and military rule brings us nowhere except mayhem and chaos.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Syria mk2 on the way?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What a horrible, bloody mess! I feel so sad for the good people of Egypt. I do hope one day they can enjoy peace and tranquility one day soon!!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

A massacare has taken place and the best America can do is say 'tut=tut, were cancelling the war games'. They fund that brutal military to the tune of 1.8 billion dollars a year. The unspoken word is they are muslims and must not be allowed to hold power, democratic or otherwise. The west is sayinmg how terrible this is to the public but in the back corridors of power they have no qualms about what is happening.

What muslim in his right mind will ever want to be preached to again about the virtues of "democracy"?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

How do we stop a cycle of violence in the middle east? We were once all hopeful and optimistic for democracy in Egypt, now that hope is dead.

It will be a quite challenge that we have to walk on the very thin ice to make sure the democratic process is moving ahead to the right direction.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The west is sayinmg how terrible this is to the public but in the back corridors of power they have no qualms about what is happening.

Other than expressing sorrow over the loss of life, why should the west have "qualms" about what's happening in Egypt? What "qualms" are being exhibited by power brokers in Muslim countries about what;s happening in Egypt? Will the African Union get involved? Saudi Arabia? Bahrain? Iran? UAE?

What muslim in his right mind will ever want to be preached to again about the virtues of "democracy"?

Hopefully, the Muslims that are living in the US.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Egypt, Syria, Iraq, now Lebanon. Muslim vs. Muslim is tearing the region apart.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

They should just split the country in 2. I don't see how else they will ever overcome this problem.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Horrific all this violence. Only a true fanatic would willingly bring his family to such a foregone conclusion.

We all know there is no negotiating with the beards, so I guess more carnage is to follow and the situation will spiral out of control when the fanatics take up arms and start their usual antics. The real fact here is the Egyptian's made a major blunder allowing these cranks into power in their fledgling democracy.....

....and the Brotherhood know they aren't stupid enough to do elect them ever again.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"The Muslim Brotherhood, trying to regroup after the assault on their encampments and the arrest of many of their leaders, called for a mass rally on Friday"

They obviously haven't yet figured out that most of the country is against them and their mis-leader Morsi.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As The Onion writes: Egypt plunges into a state of Middle East.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The military has overthrown a democratically elected government. There's not much else that matters. Mr. Morsi got the votes and should be ruling the country, for better or worse.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

" Mr. Morsi got the votes and should be ruling the country, for better or worse."

I don't think it's fair to apply logic from well established democracies to one that was hastily born. Huge swathes of the population and the army were unhappy with the fundie route Morsi was ramming down their throats.

The beards aren't afraid to die for their cause as we all know, so this situation is a win-win for them. If democracy mattered and the Brotherhood really have the public majority then they shouldn't be scared of fielding a new candidate to win.

As I posted earlier, we all know that it would never happen. Egyptians don't want an Islamic dictatorship.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"Morsi got the votes and should be ruling the country, for better or worse."

The majority of Egyptians have decided they don't want worse.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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