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Food shortages feared in UK as new Brexit rules kick in

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65 Comments
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52% suddenly announce..... Hey, we didn't vote for that!

2 ( +11 / -9 )

So may be they should get off their arses and fill out the paper work and stop using their own inefficiency as an excuse to blame others.

11 ( +15 / -4 )

Expecting importers to provide the proper paperwork on time is not a "restriction." Nice bias there from AP.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

@klausdorth - you wanted it... There were 65 million people in the UK in 2016. 17.4 million of them voted to leave the European Union.

In a typical referendum, more than 50% of the population has to vote for a major change, regardless of how many vote. That is to ensure that a minority of the population do not impose change upon the lives of the majority.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

“You asked for it, you wanted it, you got it, now deal with it (the BREXIT).”

Well,

not everyone did.

5 ( +12 / -7 )

if EU countries don't complete the forms and deliver the food, they will lose out with regards to revenue and profits. The rest of the world account for 75% of global trade. There's plenty of other countries ready to replace the food from EU countries and ready to acquire more profits. Money talks and EU gamesmanship can walk!

-13 ( +7 / -20 )

@ETHAN1001, I think you have missed the point. This is going to lead to food shortages and hunger in the UK. When the population starves anything can and will happen. I just went through Heathrow a model of British "efficiency". Perhaps this is the beginning of a unified Irish nation. This time they can watch the British starve. Why would companies go to such trouble and expense to sell food to the UK?

11 ( +20 / -9 )

The people of the UK are going to need "The Best of British" for 2022 - the year Bojo's Brexit variant bites and the Tories cry all the way to Brussels.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

You have looked to American Samoa for trade deals leaving Europe.

Well you sure made a good deal with your arrogance.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The UK should be OK for food. We have two German supermarket chains - Aldi and Lidl. I live a couple of minutes walk from a large Aldi, and I have considerable faith in German logistics.

Exports of French fruit and veg to everywhere might dip this year though. Macron has banned plastic wrapping. Whether that reduces shelf life or not, we shall see.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Well, they can chew on their soccer towels, boiled, after they realize perhaps pulling out of the EU simply over national pride and racism wasn't such a good idea.

8 ( +15 / -7 )

"I have considerable faith in German logistics."

Nothing to do with German logistics, however "perfect" they might be.

Everything to do with British importers.

The article states it, in case you've missed it:

"Beginning on Jan. 1, importers must make a full customs declaration on goods entering the UK from the EU or other countries."

Couldn't be any clearer.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Just like with the 'fuel shortage'. There will only be a food shortage in the UK because the British media would've whipped the public into mass hysteria!

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Food shortages feared in UK as new Brexit rules kick in

Fake News, I think.

-6 ( +7 / -13 )

Germans should have no issues to fill out the paper work. They will state on paper work. FOOD! Done.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

All this shows to me is that the UK was too reliant on other countries, which can be a very fickle relationship.

Domestic agriculture needs to be revitalised and this is the perfect opportunity

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Germans should have no issues to fill out the paper work. They will state on paper work. FOOD! Done.

Oh my, please look at the tariff schedules for agricultural products. They go on for pages with different tariffs for all kinds of products, many of which you probably never even thought about because they are ingredients for big industrial food processing firms and not things you buy in that form in the grocery store. Foods have many different tariffs depending on the particular food and you can thank the demands of domestic farmers for this. They wouldn't have it any other way.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Ever see that episode of Seinfeld where George quits his job in an angry outburst, then realizes he made a mistake and decides to just show up to work on Monday pretending nothing happened?

I expect Boris Johnson is getting near the point where he might give that a try.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I’m sending a consignment this month to the UK -everything will be dutifully filled out - no problem!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The UK should be OK for food. We have two German supermarket chains - Aldi and Lidl. I live a couple of minutes walk from a large Aldi, and I have considerable faith in German logistics.

Eh, they a German company but the stores sell products aimed at the UK customer and rely on warehouses and logistics in the UK. German trucks and German drivers are not delivering Aldi's or Lidi's in the UK.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

@Wobot

All this shows to me is that the UK was too reliant on other countries, which can be a very fickle relationship.

Domestic agriculture needs to be revitalised and this is the perfect opportunity

Just one tiny little problem: what was left of the British agriculture industry was heavily reliant on foreign workers...who left the UK for more welcoming shores...

13 ( +15 / -2 )

I am lauhjing my head off at all the Brixiters who were screaming that they want their country back and dont need anyones help. Now you got it! UK will disentegrade and England will be left all on it's own eating eachother and the world will be waching with dismay as it becomes a thirld world country.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

The potato famine in reverse.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

You beat me to it zichi ...

And the easy to read simplified version too, I failed to find that

It is worth mentioning another date

While drivers must declare their goods and origin certificates, checks are expected to be minimal until the rules ramp up beginning in July 2022, when much stricter checks are expected to come into force.

The UK imports five times the amount of food it exports to the EU.

The Border with the European Union - GOV.UK

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1041528/2021_December_BordersOPModel.pdf

Now, July 1st 2022, phytosanitary Certificates and physical checks on SPS goods at all border control posts will begin and this will introduce layers of paperwork.

However all parties have been aware of this fact, so it is foolish for importer/exporter to complain.

One must also factor in UK trade agreement with Australia.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Trust Brexit: This is just the beginning. it will get worse,

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Brexit seems to have moved the UK onto Trump’s list of “Somewhat Unpleasant”Countries.

I’m sad for the folk I left behind, but wild horses couldn’t drag me back to those benighted islands….

7 ( +8 / -1 )

The sad thing, cracaphat, is that the “woke” and the intelligent voted Remain.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

"The sad thing, cracaphat, is that the “woke” and the intelligent voted Remain"

i.e. 48.11% of the voters.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

52% suddenly announce..... Hey, we didn't vote for that!

An very apt comment. That 52% (but only of those who actually bothered to vote, let's remember) didn't know what they were voting for. Some wanted a Norway-style deal, others Switzerland, Australia...

An all things to all men campaign baited Neglected England and switched their anger from Osborne Austerity to the EU (that entity which often invested in those same ignored-by-Westminster regions).

Brexiteers (some of whom - if they weren't already non-dom, subsequently relocated themselves or their businesses out of Blighty) promised the easiest and best trade deal ever, oven-ready and backed by German car makers, Prosecco producers and hordes of continentals hungrily scrabbling for sterling at Dover docks. Brexit would be an exceedingly good infinity cake that could be eaten and never run out.

This constant scaremongering started before the referendum, and hasn't ceased since. And none of it has come true.

Could the dear poster kindly identify an economic or social benefit achieved so far? I don't seem to have noticed one myself.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

"Brexit problems?

Not that I could see."

Of course you didn't!

Such custom rules should have been implemented ages ago.

They were postponed, "a measure that was introduced to cope with the disruption of Brexit."

This article is very elucidative:

"Businesses will no longer be allowed to delay completing full import customs declarations for up to 175 days -- a measure that was introduced to cope with the disruption of Brexit."

Brexit problems, you say?

Didn't see any?

Of course you won't see them now.

Yer in Japan innit.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Whatever the outcome of UK leaving the European Union, economically politically, UK is and never can never be a described as “Somewhat Unpleasant”

UK democratically voted to leave the EU, not Europe.

The Russian Federation has an invasion force, parked close to Ukraine.

Enough fire power to over run Ukraine within days.

Yet, UK is public enemy number one, and indirectly Switzerland

For voters, the electorate, simply having the audacity to state we don't want to be part of an unelected, without any noticeable principal mandated authority to enact laws that could change our fundamental freedoms.

The people of the UK have been threatened, if you don't do as we demand we will take steps to force our will on you.

This is the reason UK had enough.

Now, try the same strategy with President Putin, and witness what will happen.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Jolly old UK uppercrust attitude towards other nations is proving not to be such a good decision for thier nutritional livelihood.

Its bangers n mash , beans on toast .bubble n squeak and yorkshire pudding for all.

Ireland is not worried about food.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I have to once agree with President Macron.

These migrants would simply be ruthlessly exploited.

Modern day slave labour. fixed piece rate, large agricultural gang master employment methods.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/638767/FACTSHEET_Modern_Slavery_Agricultural_v2_WEB.PDF

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The UK should allow in the migrants who can work the farms while they wait for their asylum applications. The benefit to both parties.

I don't often agree with you but on this matter I emphatically do.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

But they can't work until thier asylum applications are approved can they !

Once they've actually migrated then they become migrants.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Mickelicious...

An very apt comment. That 52% (but only of those who actually bothered to vote, let's remember) didn't know what they were voting for. Some wanted a Norway-style deal, others Switzerland, Australia...

Yes, some wanted Norway, Switzerland etc but by far the biggest factor stated by leavers was IMMIGRATION...

And for many immigration is a PC answer for "I don't like Johnny Foreigner".

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The added costs amount to some 300 Euros per consignment

1st July 2022 those costs to spiral to 400 euros

This could change the EU-UK trading relationship permanently beyond recognition

EU sector by sector will be affected.

What is the point importing/exporting products that are priced out of the market?

If the withdrawal agreement was to collapse, it could bankrupt Republic of Ireland that are, well last paragraph.

Northern Ireland and Ireland are exempt from the changes as political leaders continue negotiating the Northern Ireland protocol.

At present goods are alighting in the north

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It looks likes the left leaning wings of the French and Germans are out in force today, down arrowing comments. The truth bites! The EU sucks!

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

@YuriOtani Exactly how ''troubling'' and ''expensive'' is it to fill in a form in order to make thousands, tens of thousands, or millions of pounds from British consumers? I think you must my point regarding the global economy, competition, scare mongering and unwillingness of people to accept democratic votes.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I think anyone who supported and voted for Brexit was conned in some way. Even the Tory schemers saw too late they had created an uncontrollable monster cut loose to roam.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The only reason a vote was held was to placate some right wingers in the Tory party and try to stop the bleed of votes going to further right parties and UKIP. The people of the UK were never asking for a vote .

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@YuriOtani Exactly how ''troubling'' and ''expensive'' is it to fill in a form in order to make thousands, tens of thousands, or millions of pounds from British consumers?

Surely it behoves the importer to partner with the exporter on that WTO paperwork?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The UK should allow in the migrants who can work the farms while they wait for their asylum applications. The benefit to both parties.

No, absolutely not. They’d be taking job opportunities away from all the British people who I’m sure have been waiting with baited breath to get out and slogging in the fields. Brexit was about giving all those Britons clambering to fulfill their dream of becoming field-hands and truck drivers the chance of a lifetime. I’m sure they’ll start showing up by the tens of thousands. Any day now.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Exactly how ''troubling'' and ''expensive'' is it to fill in a form in order to make thousands, tens of thousands, or millions of pounds from British consumers?

How much experience do you have dealing with customs officials? What a firm writes on the form affects how much they pay. It is not a flat tariff across all foods. Each has their own schedule of tariffs and some are quantity dependent. There are many reasons to cheat and a lot of firms try. Customs officials scrutinize these forms looking for cheaters. Forms are rejected for a variety of reasons, delaying shipments and forcing staff to correct paperwork and often argue with customs officials. It is not a smooth trouble free process. If everybody involved was honest and competent maybe it would be but humanity isn't always competent or honest.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@ETHAN1001, forms require employees to fill out the forms correctly and present them to new customs officials. It is an added time and expense. I am sure there are delays clearing customs and food can go rotten sitting on the docks awaiting clearance. The added expense could reduce profit to lost. Who wants to pay money to provide another nation with food? Thus these companies will sell their food in a different market. As for the German food stores, perhaps they will relocate to other countries like the USA. I keep seeing new German food markets opening up across the USA. Lastly England is a small nation at around 60 million. Added expense, worries. Why would another country bother to sell them food?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

No problems with getting food in the UK and I was living in the UK 7 months this year.

Nonsense article!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The population of the UK is over 68 million so what exporters want to miss out on that market?

Again this article is nonsense!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Change was inevitable.

Trade between the UK and the EU after UK withdrawn from the single market and customs was is going to present challenges, cost increases, bureaucracy etc etc.

However, the reality is when the product hits the supermarket shelves.

This is where the politics underlining Brexit become an irrelevance.

If the customer views, then turns there back on the product, game over.

The irony is that these changes have little directly in reference to UK withdrawal, as UK is not a member of either the single market or customs union.

So, it is/was clear change was on the cards.

UK EU importers/exporters will either have to accept the new reality or create a new trading platform.

Pragmatism and politics?

That's before Australia hit the shelves. They will.

And Truss is courting India.

Offering a review of immigration and visa requirements.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Johnson lists returning crowns to pint glasses as a key Brexit success

It's back to the future as Boris hails selling stuff in pounds and ounces again.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/dec/31/boris-johnson-crowns-pint-glasses-key-brexit-success

What next? Guineas for the haves and farthings for the have nots?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Johnson Government and the oppositions parties, have proven totally incapable to finding a new revitalized economic trading alternative to decades of EU rules-based treaty COP law strategy.

That is the economics, the political is even more alarming. With the ongoing NI protocol.

All with the potential of collapse.

Although that is the worst-case scenario.

With the new French Government rotating EU presidency, in election year. The UK ready to turn on the French Government, in a toxic blame game, the signs are ominous for any compromise.   

This was always a risk.  

Every Union has its day sooner or later.

The USSR, the EU, and the UK.

They never will be a a union of equals.

The people sooner or later will realize this.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

That is the economics, the political is even more alarming. With the ongoing NI protocol.

Care to enlighten us?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

They never will be a a union of equals.

Well we are absolutely less than equal now, than when we were in the EU. The UK has a mountain to climb to get back on equal terms of countries in the EU.

Food shortages have been absolutely evident in the UK for all of 2021, and now it's predicted to get worse.

Although I voted to stay in the EU, Brexit maybe good for the UK in the future, but for the next few years at least i'm sure there's going to be a lot of hardship mostly due to the morons running the show and many false promises during the Brexit campaign.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Food shortages have been absolutely evident in the UK for all of 2021, and now it's predicted to get worse.

Not in London, the South-East and the South-West and Scotland in 2021.

Oh, Liverpool too.

I did over 8000 miles all over the UK and never went hungry!

Maybe in some Northern backwater there have been shortages?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@kurisupisu

The article is about the future concerns of food supplies for the UK, and not about whatever you ate or did over the last 7 months .besides your not even there anymore.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I am lauhjing my head off at all the Brixiters who were screaming that they want their country back and dont need anyones help. Now you got it! UK will disentegrade and England will be left all on it's own eating eachother and the world will be waching with dismay as it becomes a thirld world country.

I didn't vote for Brexit but I do wonder how ex pats who live in Japan and love it's mono-ethnic culture would react if the Japanese government signed up to an Asian trade deal that gave everyone in Asia the automatic right to come and live and work in Japan. How many would support it?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I didn't vote for Brexit but I do wonder how ex pats who live in Japan and love it's mono-ethnic culture would react if the Japanese government signed up to an Asian trade deal that gave everyone in Asia the automatic right to come and live and work in Japan. How many would support it?

Is that Powell's Rivers of Blood or Farage's doctored Breaking Point?

What made your home town the city it is today, Londonlad?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Yeah well, fear is not news; it is speculation and there won’t be any shortages except maybe due to a small shortfall in the number of lorry drivers and there are (according to what I saw) HGV drivers being trained all over.

Anybody who takes time to see where goods are sourced knows full well that UK supermarkets carry goods from all over the world and not just from Europe.

AP’s predictions just don’t cut the mustard.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Is this some kind of April fool article? Certainly fake news, BREXIT wasn't a great move but if the world thinks that the 5th richest country in the world can't provide its own food then they must be on some weird pill. If anything, the shops have too much produce. Prices may go up on some goods but that is it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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