COVID-19 INFORMATION What you need to know about the coronavirus if you are living in Japan or planning a visit.
world

Egyptian army sides with Mubarak

86 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

86 Comments
Login to comment

"I want to feel like I chose my president"

You mean Mubarack wasn't chosen by the Egyptian people?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pro-Mubarak supporters have come on to the streets of Cairo and there have been violent clashes between demonstrators and police in Alexandria. Will Egypt manage to avoid serious violence between now and Friday? It’s not looking good. But let’s hope that daylight will calm things down.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Peace in Egypt. Step up,all things for more peace in Egypt.

It will be lots of work,for all political parties and Mubarak's Party ,till next President comes in via elections in Sept2011.

Feel opposition parties,has grabbed more votes,via these protests. The opposition definitely,going to be stronger voice in next govt in Sept 2011.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

sarge, i cant believe I have to explain this to you (or you just enjoy twisting the news), but, anybody born after 1981 (when mubarak took office) hadn't the opportunity to choose their president.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When angry mobs of men overthrow a government the outcome is never good. Mohamed ElBaradei belongs to the Muslim Brotherhood. Sharia law is coming to Egypt.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

anybody born after 1981 (when mubarak took office) hadn't the opportunity to choose their president." and that's something like 80% of the populace now.

Mohamed ElBaradei belongs to the Muslim Brotherhood. Sharia law is coming to Egypt." All we can do now is shrug our shoulders and lose Egypt as an ally. Not much anyone one can do and not for nothing, Mubarak is like that ugly chick your girl brings around and is always a third wheel....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"Mohamed ElBaradei belongs to the Muslim Brotherhood. Sharia law is coming to Egypt." All we can do now is shrug our shoulders and lose Egypt as an ally."

i guess of a learner of a certain breed of narrow journalism, from america at a guess??...not listening to the word on street ( available from many news sources) from Egypt that doesnt echo that view

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"Mohamed ElBaradei belongs to the Muslim Brotherhood. Sharia law is coming to Egypt."

Except that Mohamed ElBaradei DOES NOT belong to the Muslim Brotherhood. Tatanka, doublecheck your facts before you comment.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I feel sorry for the Egyptian people, havving had this tyrant as their President for so long. he should smell the coffee and go now, not in September. If he doesnt, then there is going to be a civil war, and the whole country, which has made suich amazing advances in the past 30 years, faces destruction. The man is evil.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

250,000 protesters demanding he step down.

Millions apparently not demanding he step down.

Sounds like he's not "defying" the majority.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Except that Mohamed ElBaradei DOES NOT belong to the Muslim Brotherhood.

OK, who does he belong to?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"OK, who does he belong to?"

Ummm... Egypt?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not sure if his immediate stepping down would be such a good idea. Better to have a slow transition, etc till the elections in september.

Most radical changes don't result in good outcomes only more radical ones.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

paulinusa - nice try, but he doesn't even live there. What political group is supporting ElBaradei?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Mubarak has to go because he has lost power. He has to step down. He is finished. He has been corrupt, incompendent, an authoritarian and brutal for over 30 years. Under his regime, Egypt became decrepit politically, economically, and socially. Anger in the country over poverty, unemployment, and politcla repression is fueling against him. The country has been reduced to a political slum period. The Egyptian people deserve better and must chart a new future. They need real Democracy. It's time for Mubarak to pack up his bags and leave for Saudi Arabia.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Most of the opposition groups supported ElBaradei initially and still do, but I think the Muslim Brotherhood has since backed off having him represent them as an opposition spokesman.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Noveacha.

WHO will taker over when Mubarak steps down now?

The radical element will do so, is that what you want for Egypt and the ME?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

but I think the Muslim Brotherhood has since backed off having him represent them as an opposition spokesman.

Please don't assume if you don't know that they have backed off. Does he have a political party? What is his agenda? What makes you say he is not just a front for the Muslim Brotherhood?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Most of the opposition groups supported ElBaradei

Do you know who are the opposition groups? I haven't seen any details of these reported.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WHO will taker over when Mubarak steps down now? The radical element will do so, is that what you want for Egypt and the ME?

This is exactly the problem.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Glenn Beck huh?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

a quarter million out of 80 million isn't really that much of the population. I saw on TV interviews with people out in the country that liked him and wanted him to stay. So he's been in power 30 years. The country has peace in those 30 years haven't they? What will come to Egypt once this power vacuum is left? Radicalism I'm sure will start to come. Didn't we hear about chaos hitting the streets of Baghdad when the US took out Hussein? What's different here? What if outright violence starts to happen and suicide bombers start blowing people up? Will you blame the US again? Probably.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It will be a great 'embrassment' for America if Mubarak decided to crush the protestors with US made M1A1 and M60A1 tanks! The 'card' he has to play with his boss was this one!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

paulinusa:

" Except that Mohamed ElBaradei DOES NOT belong to the Muslim Brotherhood. Tatanka, doublecheck your facts before you comment. "

And how do you know that? Do you have private information about his affiliations? Fact is, he has been defending the muslim brotherhood in a way that should scare you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The key is in the transition....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Suerlib.

Agree on that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Mubarak defies a quarter-million protesters demanding he step down immediately

Sounds like the Associated Press wants him to step down. The media has been championing the protesters since the very beginning, without any journalistic integrity.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WHO will taker over when Mubarak steps down now?

The radical element will do so, is that what you want for Egypt and the ME?

There is no guarantee of this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Triumvere.

I disagree I said 'radical' NOT 'muslim radical'. :p

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It will be a great 'embrassment' for America if Mubarak decided to crush the protestors with US made M1A1 and M60A1 tanks! The 'card' he has to play with his boss was this one!

Actually those tanks are made in Egypt under license. The US should be credited for creating jobs in Egypt. Whose embarrassed just-a-guy?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

he has been defending the muslim brotherhood in a way that should scare you.

In truth, he has compared them to just another party like Marxists or whatever. Not really a confidence builder, I admit.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"And how do you know that? Do you have private information about his affiliations?"

From Wikipedia:" The Guardian reported that Mohamed ElBaradei has been mandated by the Muslim Brotherhood and four other opposition groups to negotiate an interim "national salvation government." However, BBC reports that Muslim Brotherhood, the largest opposition party banned by Mubarak's regime, has not consented to the choice of ElBaradei as the representative of the opposition "The people have not appointed Mohamed ElBaradei to become a spokesman of them. The Muslim Brotherhood is much stronger than Mohamed ElBaradei as a person. And we do not agree on he himself to become representing [sic] this movement, the movement is represented by itself, and it will come up with a committee... to make delegations with any government."[58]

0 ( +0 / -0 )

paulinusa

The Muslim Brotherhood is much stronger than Mohamed ElBaradei as a person.

elbaradei is not a Muslim Brotherhood leader. However he is a front for the Muslim Brotherhood and other groups who are using him to put a public face on this revolution.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

mikehuntez: "What if outright violence starts to happen and suicide bombers start blowing people up? Will you blame the US again? Probably."

Why would anyone blame the US if violence came about after Mubarak is forced out by the Egyptian people? I'm sure some on here will rush to blame OBAMA, but no one with half a mind would simply blame the US. If anything, the US is getting a lot of flack for supporting the current dictator for the past 30 years.

WilliB and manfromamerica: It's humorous to watch you guys talk about how people need to get their facts straight before posting but then SUGGEST (since you have no proof) that Mubarak is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, and that the Muslim Brotherhood is some sinister group of radical Islamists. You need to heed your own words and get some facts to back up your statement, and it would be preferred if you could learn to differentiate between Islamic sects and learn that often you guys are more radical than the people you claim are radicals.

Regardless, Mubarak will be gone within the month, for sure, and I'd be surprised if he lasts the week. The military isn't supporting him and fighting the mobs, so the mobs are going to go and get him if he doesn't leave of his own volition. Hopefully he does.

YES, it's entirely possible that people MORE dangerous that Mubarak will struggle for the thrown, but it's also possible they'll get someone better. As SuperLib rightly said, the key is in the transition.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

YES, it's entirely possible that people MORE dangerous that Mubarak will struggle for the thrown, but it's also possible they'll get someone better. As SuperLib rightly said, the key is in the transition.

Agreed.

WilliB and manfromamerica: It's humorous to watch you guys talk about how people need to get their facts straight before posting but then SUGGEST (since you have no proof) that Mubarak is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, and that the Muslim Brotherhood is some sinister group of radical Islamists.

somewhat agree. I did suggest without any proof that he's a Muslim Brotherhood puppet as a response to people saying (baselessly) that he definitively is not. My point earlier was that we don't know what his role is, the AP is hardly covering it but rather cheerleading the event. The media loves this because they want a story to cover, so they are making it into a popular uprising for democratic ideal and individual rights and freedoms, ignoring the harsh reality of radical Islam and Egypt as a birthplace of modern ME terrorism.

When it's tea party coverage, however, forget rights - the old ladies are racist terrorists.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

YES, it's entirely possible that people MORE dangerous that Mubarak will struggle for the thrown, but it's also possible they'll get someone better.

I don't think anyone is struggling to be thrown. However, I do agree that a smooth transition is the key. The key to this is the army.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maybe Mubarak needs a rebranding. Let's get the Starbucks ad agency to work on it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

manfromamerica: "My point earlier was that we don't know what his role is, the AP is hardly covering it but rather cheerleading the event."

Glad to see your posts are becoming more down-to-earth, but if you don't know one way or the other, why suggest he might be one thing but not another? I mean, especially in light of the fact that the guy's been backed by the US for the 30 years he's been in office -- second only to Israel. So what does it say if you're suddenly calling him a front for radical Islam, and what does that mean if you think he's going to be replaced by radical Islamists? Your arguments here seem somewhat contradictory.

"The media loves this because they want a story to cover, so they are making it into a popular uprising for democratic ideal and individual rights and freedoms, ignoring the harsh reality of radical Islam and Egypt as a birthplace of modern ME terrorism."

Sigh. Scratch what I said above about the down-to-earth part. The media 'loves' this because it is a MAJOR event, much like what happened in Tunisia, and it's as newsworthy as the cyclone about to bash Australia. There is most certainly bias depending on the news source, but it's still a story worthy of reporting, without a doubt. As for the rest of your post... peshaw.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

smithinjapan-

Glad to see your posts are becoming more down-to-earth, but if you don't know one way or the other, why suggest he might be one thing but not another?

I'm pointing out that we don't know.

I mean, especially in light of the fact that the guy's been backed by the US for the 30 years he's been in office -- second only to Israel.

for good reason.

So what does it say if you're suddenly calling him a front for radical Islam, and what does that mean if you think he's going to be replaced by radical Islamists? Your arguments here seem somewhat contradictory.

I do think he will be replaced by radical Islamists.

The media 'loves' this because it is a MAJOR event,

smithinjapan, you have to admit the media is not doing any indepth investigation into this. Every news program says the SAME thing, which is nothing.

but it's still a story worthy of reporting,

yes, and worthy of reporting accurately, with deep investigation. The current stories don't any depth or real info. And what they do report is partisan. Read this headline, it says it all. Good news or bad news, media needs to actually dig a little bit.

"protesters" - what protesters? Who are they? Who sent them there? For days the media didn't bother to ask.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

peshaw.

Sorry, is that Arabic?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

the cyclone about to bash Australia.

Why would anyone want to criticize Australia?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Many Americans have a hard time coming to terms with reality. This protest is against Mubarak a dictator in police state Egypt. This protest is also against USA for supporting and bribing a dictator and aiding the police state and supporting suppression of free speech, torture, kidnappings and other form of human right violations.

So far I think Biden´s Mubarak is no dictator, he shouldn’t step down… comment have been the most comical to this date. Americans do have good sense of irony or they are just utterly ignorant.

Clinton has so far stated. The Egyptian government is stable and is looking for ways to respond to the legitimate needs and interests of the Egyptian people

In other words USA is once again not supporting popular movements by the people but dictators. These protests are for better living conditions, jobs and DEMOCRACY! That´s what the people in Egypt want. They are protesting to get freedom. Something USA does not support. The only contribution USA has made so far is by providing tear gas to authority to crush down protests for freedom.

It´s up to the people of Egypt to decide who they elect and what system of governance they follow. USA or anyone else has no right to say otherwise. Turkey, Lebanon, Palestinian democratic elected leaders have openly supported these rallies. Hopefully when Muslim Brotherhood does form a new government they can not only work closely with Hamas and Hezbollah but also support the Palestinian and the Lebanese cause. Especially Hamas which controls Gaza which borders Egypt, and given the fact that Hamas is an off shoot of Muslim Brotherhood.

Muslim Brotherhood supports USA in 1 thing. That is the isolation of Syria as Muslim Brotherhood does not support any types of dictatorships whether Islam or secular. They respect freedom just as the other Islamic political parties such as Hamas and Hezbollah. Unlike USA.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If anything, the US is getting a lot of flack for supporting the current dictator for the past 30 years.

Funny that flack and outrage comes only now but not last year or the year before or the last decade or two or three. Funny how the fake outrage is so delayed. Maybe that's because while Mubarak was President of Egypt it enjoyed a rather peaceful existence with it's neighbors. But now because a fraction of the population is protesting He and the US are such evil things. This is typical of the left's liberal selective outrage.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They respect freedom just as the other Islamic political parties such as Hamas and Hezbollah.

Wow!! :-D

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maybe that's because while Mubarak was President of Egypt it enjoyed a rather peaceful existence with it's neighbors. But now because a fraction of the population is protesting He and the US are such evil things. This is typical of the left's liberal selective outrage.

The left just doesn't like a man of color in power. It's an issue of racism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hezbollah, Hamas and Muslim Brotherhood share one thing in common. They are democratic. MB´s 15 Principles for an Egyptian National Charter - includes

"freedom of personal conviction... opinion... forming political parties... public gatherings... free and fair elections..."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hezbollah, Hamas and Muslim Brotherhood share one thing in common. They are democratic. MB´s 15 Principles for an Egyptian National Charter - includes "freedom of personal conviction... opinion... forming political parties... public gatherings... free and fair elections..."

They also engage in terrorism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

obvious by the comments here some americas are so obsessed with muslims...try watching some news from other countries reporting from the same place and you will learn you are creating news out of your own prejudices..its a non issue..not happening...you are making the news up in your mind.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Americans need to wake up to reality and educate themselves. Islamists are not monolith and lumping them all together will just worsen the trust which is already minimal with the Muslim world. Most people outside of USA does not trust that country. Can you blame them? Many in the Muslim world hates America as much as their own repressive governments. USA needs to start respecting Arabs in the Middle East. Stop aiding dictators and doing whatever to stop democracy and freedom. United States would be smart to support and communicate with nonviolent Islamist movements such as BH. Which after all is the biggest Islamist organization in the world and very much supported by the people in Egypt and the Middle East.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

""protesters" - what protesters? Who are they? Who sent them there? For days the media didn't bother to ask."

The MEDIA is that the same as the "ROYAL WE"...not sure which news sources you are getting your opinions from.. Because the world's "the media " are asking and reporting those things.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

manfromamerica: "I'm pointing out that we don't know."

No, you're stating what is not known as though it were fact. But at the same time you criticize others of 'not having facts' to back up their statements. Sorry to have to spell it out this clearly, but HYPOCRISY! (take a look in the dictionary if you feel what you've dealt has been dealt to you... or better yet, check it anyway).

mikehuntez: "Funny that flack and outrage comes only now but not last year or the year before or the last decade or two or three. Funny how the fake outrage is so delayed."

Like I said, you sad lot would find a way to blame the current admin for your own misdirected woes. It's just humorous that on the same thread you ask who would dare be against the US! Actually, that in mind, hypocrite is a bit of a compliment. What do you call a hypocrite who can't actually come up with something original, aside from Rush Limbaugh?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

manfromamerica: "smithinjapan, you have to admit the media is not doing any indepth investigation into this. Every news program says the SAME thing, which is nothing."

Okay, I'll bite, assuming you'll do me the courtesy of being as objective as you can and carrying on an argument on the topic at hand.

What do you expect Western media, without direct access, to do? It sounds like you are simply waiting for what you WANT to hear from the media, but when you hear what's going on you question it. There's nothing wrong with the latter, but something VERY wrong if you ask people to hang out and wait to agree with biased opinion.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think what ppl like smithinjapan want to say is that if this goes wrong and Egypt, as has been the historical case, ends up with just another dictator, it will be America's fault.

if it turns out alright tho well then the common man in Egypt, the victim of 30 years of US oppression (or something) will have taught America a lesson! He will have humbled the American giant etc etc.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I hope the Egyptian peoples are just as strongly averse to any further U.S. meddling in their politics.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genzaiyotei:

" Hezbollah, Hamas and Muslim Brotherhood share one thing in common. They are democratic. "

Nope, they are not. They are fundamentalist islamic. You only have to a minimum amount of homework that islamic fundamentalism and democracy are fundamentally different concept. In fact, from the fundamentalist point of view, democracy is blasphemy.

The three organizations you mention are all happy to use the democratic process to get into power. Don´t mistake that for being "democratic".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

smithinjapan:

" WilliB and manfromamerica: It's humorous to watch you guys talk about how people need to get their facts straight before posting but then SUGGEST (since you have no proof) that Mubarak is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, and that the Muslim Brotherhood is some sinister group of radical Islamists. "

How many things can you get wrong in one sentence? I have never suggested that Mubarak is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood. I did point out that the much-praised Mohammed Al Baradai is sympathetic to them. Completely different statement.

And the Muslim Brotherhood is not only "some" group of radical islamists, but the ideological mother of all of them. Read up on Hassan al Bannah. The policy papers of the Muslim Brotherhood are calling for the gradual desstruction of Western civilization and the creation of a world-wide caliphate. (I would post direct quotes, but the mod tends to remove them. So do your own reasearch.)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

hope the Egyptian peoples are just as strongly averse to any further U.S. meddling in their politics

. Me too. If we in America are lucky they will refuse the billions in aid we waste on them. God knows we have plenty in America who could use a little help.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WilliB

The three organizations you mention are all happy to use the democratic process to get into power. Don´t mistake that for being "democratic".

Wrong. They are democratic political parties. They don´t boycott elections or ban political groups. It´s that USA boycotts certain democratic elections because the election results was not what it hoped for. And by supporting unfree elections Egypt and propping up a dictator it is USA which is anything but democratic. One of the most decadent and repressive regimes in Middle East is also an US ally so it makes no sense to first be saying they want to spread democracy and at the same time support dictators. And then warn others that Muslim Brotherhood is not democratic. In any case, no wonder USA have minimum support. It´s because they say one thing and do something completely different.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Many in the Muslim world hates America" So, we should all stop and completely change our ways and be guilty for what we have accomplished? You ask most Americans, and they'll tell you straight that they would prefer not giving money to these dictators. But let's be clear, the so called left here is going on how the US supports dictators, yet they hail one of the most repressive dictators as their epitome of what society should be. The questions Americans need to ask are 1. can we survive on our own, as the poster writes, WE ARE HATED, 2. I sure as heck ain't gonna kiss any butt, so how do we prepare ourselves for a big fight, 3. should we keep people who clearly hate us out of our country 4. Should we stay out of their way regardless of the circumstances?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The policy papers of the Muslim Brotherhood are calling for the gradual desstruction of Western civilization and the creation of a world-wide caliphate.

This is such non sense. Where do you get this from? I suggest you stop reading American corporate propaganda for 1 month, you might as well start reading science fiction. Muslim Brotherhood according to their web page reject global jihad and embrace democracy.

MB rejects global jihad and embrace democracy.

further from MB´s web page Ikhwanweb

Regarding the carricatures in Denmark, MB Egypt came with this statement.

Although it criticized the cartoons for hurt[ing] the feelings of Muslim, it devoted more space to calling for increased cooperation between Muslims and non-Muslims. The jihadists, in contrast, were offering blood money for the heads of the cartoonists and coordinating embassy burning days.

These are not the same people US propaganda machine tries to brain wash people with. If you believe they are suicide bombers who want to destroy the world and introduce Sharia Law by force it means you are watching too much US TV or hanging out with Americans too much. To these people, I urge you to stop watching US TV and spend less time with other fellow American people and more with non Americans. If you are in the military industry then I urge you to change jobs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I wonder what the military leaders got in return. And I wonder if this is in any way related to Obama's sending Frank Wisner of the CIA (former Vice Chairman of AIG and director of Enron) to advise Mubarak.

This whole thing can get really ugly.

Lets hope Mubarak leaves soon, to be replaced by someone who while consider the wishes of the people.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is very good what is happening in the Middle East. This young generation will decide there own future and destiny and remove these dictators from power.

Funny so many stand against the principles of freedom and democracy towards the Middle East yet enjoy that freedom on our side of the world.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is such non sense. Where do you get this from? I suggest you stop reading American corporate propaganda for 1 month, you might as well start reading science fiction. Muslim Brotherhood according to their web page reject global jihad and embrace democracy.

No Offense the Al Queda number two guy is who?

Oh yeah.....This guy.

By the age of 14, al-Zawahiri had joined the Muslim Brotherhood. The following year the Egyptian government executed Qutb for conspiracy, and al-Zawahiri, along with four other secondary school students, helped form an "underground cell devoted to overthrowing the government and establishing an Islamist state." It was at this early age that al-Zawahiri developed a mission in life, "to put Qutb's vision into action."[13] His cell eventually merged with others to form al-Jihad or Egyptian Islamic Jihad.[14] Al-Zawahiri graduating from Cairo University in 1974 with gayyid giddan. Following that he served three years as a surgeon in the Egyptian Army after which he established a clinic near his parents.[14] In 1978, he also earned a master's degree in surgery.[15]

I don't think he's embracing Democracy. and please show me where the Muslim Bortherhood has dis-avowed him now.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

southsakai:

" This is very good what is happening in the Middle East. This young generation will decide there own future and destiny and remove these dictators from power. "

The pro-western dictators, yes. Don´t expect any revolt against the islamist dictators in Gaza and the Hez-Allah areas of Lebanon. (That would be meet a short and bloody end.)

It is funny how so many here naively expect that a pro-Shariah majority will vote itself to "freedom and democracy".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genzeivotei: (about Hisb-Allah, Hamas, and the Muslim Brotherhood)

" Wrong. They are democratic political parties. They don´t boycott elections or ban political groups. "

No, you are wrong. They are "democratic" in that a majority of the indoctrinated population voted for them, but that is where the democracy stops. Read their political platforms. Check how they deal with political opponents (does Harari ring a bell? How about throwing Hamas members of rooftops in Gaza?) They are all about submitting the world under Shariah. Not a word about the opposite direction. Dream on.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genzaivotei:

" This is such non sense. Where do you get this from? I suggest you stop reading American corporate propaganda for 1 month, you might as well start reading science fiction. "

My quote about the goal of the Muslim Brotherhood was not from "American corporate propaganda", but from a Muslim Brotherhood policy paper.

I posted it here, but the moderator removed it, because he found it "offensive". Goggle for "An Explanatory Memorandum on the General Strategic Goal for the Group in North America", you´ll find copies of it.

Read and be surprised.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We should be careful with the Muslim Brotherhood. The book "Surrendering Islam - The subversion of Muslim politics throughout history until the present day" demonstrates that various opposition movements, including the Muslim Brotherhood, are carefully groomed by Western intelligence to come into play when it is time for a regime change.

Although the oppressive measures from which the Egyptian people have suffered might be temporarily eased, once in government, any opposition party will serve the same pay-masters.

And Obama sending Frank Wisner of the CIA (former Vice Chairman of AIG and director of Enron) to advise Mubarak is very worrying.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I guess this was really the only logical choice to make. You can't have Mubarak stay, but you can't have the country throw itself into chaos. By backing Mubarak the military might be betting that they can buy some time which would be good to plan out some kind of transition.

What that ends up being remains to be seen. You might have the best plan made with the best intentions but over 10 or 20 or 30 years there's just no way you can predict what might develop as a result of your action or inaction.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I don't know why people are debating the good and bad of the Muslim Brotherhood. But today looking at this changing story that the Egyptian Army sides with Mubarak is funny in that it shows those protesters don't really represent the "will of the people" at all. It only shows the will of a FRACTION of the people. It's like if the Liberal Party supporters in Canada protested to oust Harper (Progressive Conservative Party). Well Harper got elected by having more votes so those Liberal protesters are not really representative of the will of the people. This is what is happening in Egypt right now. Those apposed to him are demonstrating while those that are not apposed are not. But it seems that some have had enough and are there to support him. Can all read this and understand that I did not mention US politics? Or are there some out there that want to twist my words again and try to blame me for hauling some Neo-Con dude into this equation of which it totally untrue.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genzaiyotei: If you believe they are suicide bombers who want to destroy the world and introduce Sharia Law by force it means (insert useless radical anti-Americanism here)

There's been a lot of talk about "supporting democracy" and "not supporting democracy" but it's been a rather loose play on words. You can accept democracy and the outcome but not choose to work with the democratically elected leaders. And any country has the right to decide who they will and will not work with, especially if the people on the other side of the table are trying to kill you. If you don't like your brother-in-law you don't have to talk to him, but that doesn't make you anti-marriage.

Secondly, while the Muslim Brotherhood might not be setting off bombs, it should be clear that they support a Sharia state. Just do a search for "Sharia law in Egypt if a majority 'allows it'" on BBC dot com to see the interview. I should note that since BBC disagrees with you that they must have just recently been bought out by the American Corporate yadda yadda yadda or however it goes.

What's we're looking at is a situation where a party could be democratically elected with a platform that essentially rolls back personal freedom. We're used to seeing groups try to use force to accomplish that goal but that's where the Muslim Brotherhood is unique. They do not use force but if they ever do get into power the result would be the same, a Sharia state. It's illogical to think that one could say they support democracy to the point where they'll see it destroyed as a result. To put it in other words, I don't buy what you're selling. I think your motivated by things you won't admit to.

Hopefully the military will be able to keep the two sides apart long enough for Egypt to make a plan. And hopefully that plan will keep the Muslim Brotherhood in the minority.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well Harper got elected by having more votes so those Liberal protesters are not really representative of the will of the people.

An odd analogy, considering Harper runs a minority government and therefore also doesn't represent the will of all or even the majority of Canadians. How is the Egyptian Army siding with Mubarak a show that the protesters don't represent the will of the majority of the people? How many Despotic governments stay in power only becuase the army supports them (I.E. North Korea). What is apparent is that a significant amount of Egyptians have lost so much confidence in their president that they are willing to take to the street in protest. Mubarak shouldn't step down but should call for an immediate election, proving if the majority of Egyptians have confidence or no confidence in him (The democratic process).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And hopefully that plan will keep the Muslim Brotherhood in the minority.

Why? If a majority of Egyptians want a government lead by the Muslim Brotherhood, no one has any right to interfere. If the majority want a Sharia state, then that is their right to want it. Some vote to not allow gay marriage to be recognized by the state on the religious grounds, limiting some peoples personal freedoms, it isn't undemocratic, simply it is the will of majority of people.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

ah americans and muslim talk, how cute, keep the immagination going, dont bother checking whats actually going on...ah wmd really existed in iraq anyone. hand on the trigger already

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One of my brother in laws is Egyptian and he does not like Mubarak, but he, himself also told me many, many Egyptians do not trust this Muslim Brotherhood, so, hopefully Egypt one day will have peace in tranquility, NMRK.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I guess this was really the only logical choice to make. You can't have Mubarak stay, but you can't have the country throw itself into chaos. By backing Mubarak the military might be betting that they can buy some time which would be good to plan out some kind of transition.

Do you think the people will wait another 8 months though? I agree with what you are saying but the people of Egypt are probably far less patient about the subject than you and I.

I would have rather seen the military stay out of it, as they had up to now but I guess it wouldn't hurt to have them providing security against the goons that have been trying to upset the uprising.

Taka

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And Obama sending Frank Wisner of the CIA

You have the wrong Frank Wisner.

What I find worrying is the US's willingness to let their friends hang in the breeze at a moment's notice. Hardly reassuring for any country considering trusting the US.

The army taking a stand for stability is probably a very good thing at this time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

atamant:

" What I find worrying is the US's willingness to let their friends hang in the breeze at a moment's notice. Hardly reassuring for any country considering trusting the US. "

The current US administration has, alas, the wrong friends.

Remember the demonstrations against the islamist regime in Iran? Barry sided firmly with the mullahs and against the demonstrators.

Now we have the Muslim Brotherhood demonstrating against Mubaraks secular regime, and guess what: Barry sides with the Muslim Brotherhood.

Can´t say he is inconsistent, alas.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

All protests in Egypt have been peaceful. According to the news, only the Tea Party is violent.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

888naf - CNN, AP.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The subversion of Muslim politics throughout history until the present day" demonstrates that various opposition movements, including the Muslim Brotherhood, are carefully groomed by Western intelligence to come into play when it is time for a regime change.

LOL!!! sabi - I see, the CIA supports Israel, and also promotes terrorism against Israel? I assume the Mossad and Zionists are also in this to strengthen the need for arms sales to Israel in an effort to make the entire Middle East oil region Zionist?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The current US administration has, alas, the wrong friends.

Yes, sadly, in addition to the wrong outlook in these cases.

This is one of those times when hope actually rides on the Egyptian army keeping control of the situation.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

manfromamerica:

" LOL!!! sabi - I see, the CIA supports Israel, and also promotes terrorism against Israel? I assume the Mossad and Zionists are also in this to strengthen the need for arms sales to Israel in an effort to make the entire Middle East oil region Zionist? "

Welcome to Sabi´s world. No matter what, the Zionists are to blame. One can´t help but be in awe about their almost supernatural powers :-)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Zionist or the USA? Which one is responsible for all that happens in Egypt? I'm confused now because we keep hearing how all of Egypt's problems are either caused by the US or Zionists (or is it Mossad and CIA?). Well let's see if these Mohammedan Brotherhood can lead the country to true democracy Sharia style. That should be interesting. There goes Egypt's tourist industry and Egyptians will be enjoying a standard of living up there with the Afghanis. I wonder if they will shell the pyramids because they don't like any symbols of anything. If they do don't dare draw a cartoon of them with a true bearded democrat looking at them. You'd risk your life of your right to life. But when is sharia democracy about rights? Who ya gonna call? Allahbusters!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Taka313: Do you think the people will wait another 8 months though? I agree with what you are saying but the people of Egypt are probably far less patient about the subject than you and I.

I was hoping they were, but after watching the videos last night I can't say that I have a lot of hope left. You have a movement based on anger and it's probably impossible to suddenly change gears and start thinking about the future.

I would have rather seen the military stay out of it, as they had up to now but I guess it wouldn't hurt to have them providing security against the goons that have been trying to upset the uprising.

Protecting one side seems almost impossible to me. You're going to have collateral damage and in the emotional state people are in right now they won't see it as collateral damage, they'll see it as the military attacking them. If they try to send the crowds home for their own good and to restore stability then both sides will claim the military is against them. The military is in a position where they can only lose, and if they can lose without using force people will be able to move past that a lot faster when the dust settles.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How the West (US especially) is dropping its allies like hot potatoes is something that other secular leaders are watching with great attention. At this clip, Israel will be surrounded by radical islamist states very soon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

dont think the us is dropping its allies. they are trying to swap another dictator in for mubarak as we speak.. of course the bullets mubarak is using have made in usa on them

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites