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England rushes to discharge hospital patients to ease bed shortage crisis

29 Comments
By Andrew MacAskill

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29 Comments
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Britain had a horrible Covid strategy and now their underperforming healthcare system is being exposed.

-6 ( +7 / -13 )

I keep reading all this NHS falling apart 'news'... meanwhile, my elderly sister falls over, is soon whisked off to hospital by ambulance, stays a few days even though the family volunteers to have someone with her all the time at home, gets tested for.... everything.... then is ambulanced home, care workers spending hours a day with her, in shifts, and supported local-council accommodation being lined up...... and she has no severe illness or affliction, just falls over, no-one knows why (though at 81 and a physical wreck because she's never looked after herself, that's not surprising to me)....

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Politically motivated and created crisis.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

This is just more nonsense. The reason why many frail and elderly people can’t get discharged is because there is no social care, no care home places, mostly due to a shortage of carers. How will this work? More hot air.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

British working people pay National Health and Pension Insurance but the amounts collected do not cover their costs.

Unemployed and retired are paying zero. All UK residents can obtain NHS healthcare.

Universal healthcare means free at the source. In Japan, we pay a smaller fee for healthcare in addition to monthly insurance.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

The state-run health service, which delivers free care for to the whole population

In England, hospital care is free, but generally people have to pay for care homes. It's not clear (to me anyway) whether this plan to move more people into care homes will entail costs to the patients.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

It's not free.

People pay taxes -- high taxes -- for it.

Whether it's Canada or the UK or anywhere else, I wish people would stop saying that it's "free health care." 

Nothing, especially health care, is ever free.

Many Canadians will look you straight in the eye and crow that Canadian healthcare is free - ignoring the crippling taxes, horrific wait times for surgeries, and increasing number of Canadians who travel to the US for healthcare unavailable to them right at home.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Brits and Canadian seeking healthcare in the US will have to pay for it. My American parents paid hundreds of thousands for their life-threatening operations.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Time to remember about the red bus proclaiming the Brexit would fund NHS enough.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

A lot of people here in South Cal have been coming down with Covid for the second time. Illness has become a way of life.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A number of separate factors coming together have created an exceptional situation creating pressure on the system. Covid remains, but is no longer the danger it was before widespread vaccination though it has left a backlog of elective procedures needing to be dealt with leading to excess pressure, annual flue is here as usual though due to the isolation in the past few years peoples immune systems are less robust leading to higher rates of hospitalisation, strep A we could have done without but these things happen, any one of which could have been accommodated but combined have created a tsunami.

The strikes are unjustified and unnecessary, there is an independent mechanism in place to ensure their pay is increased appropriately and in comparison to a lot of workers they are quite well paid, many of those now being inconvenienced/endangered would dearly love to be as well paid as they are.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The UK is an expensive place to live and health care costs are high.

A fair amount of expense taken up by hospital managers that receive high salaries if they are able to keep trimming costs.

The high number of elderly patients also eats into budgets.

The system is old and rundown and needs more tax money

1 ( +2 / -1 )

British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak said last week that reducing hospital waiting lists was one of his five priorities for Britain this year.

So in Britain, being Prime Minister means you are CEO of the monopoly health service provider?

Great idea.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

So in Britain, being Prime Minister means you are CEO of the monopoly health service provider

No.

Perhaps you would prefer a privatised model providing care to the well off and fat profits to a few privileged shareholders parasiting off the misery, suffering, desperation and death of the majority?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Brits who had medical treatment oversea like in Turkey have lived to regret their decisions.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Brits and Canadian seeking healthcare in the US will have to pay for it.

you mean its not free?

My American parents paid hundreds of thousands for their life-threatening operations.

"hundreds of thousands"!!

Brits who had medical treatment oversea like in Turkey have lived to regret their decisions.

I finally know where Zichi went as well as his lucidity situation...

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

master

you mean its not free?

Yes, without American health insurance then the full amounts are payable by non-Americans unless covered by travel health insurance.

My elderly American parents who passed away a few years ago spent hundreds of thousands on operations. They could at least afford it. We settled the final accounts from the estate.

New hips, new knees, and many others.

In the UK, I worked in two hospitals one NHS and another a very expensive private one called the London Clinic. Check out the prices they charge. A bed for the night 40 years ago was £1,000 per night.

There have been many articles in the British media that went overseas for medical or dental treatments and many regretted it.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Some hospital beds are taken up by elderly patients who should be in care homes or at home with home help visitors. However such social care services are mostly inadequate due to the local governments that provide them suffering from huge cuts in funding from central government. This is part of the central government's "austerity" program since 2010.

UK hospitals also have many Covid patients, but Covid policy has been politicized to the extent that government cannot even recommend people wear masks any more. Everyone has to pretend that Covid is over, regardless of whether hospitals have dozens of beds full of Covid patients.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Many Canadians will look you straight in the eye and crow that Canadian healthcare is free - ignoring the crippling taxes, horrific wait times for surgeries, and increasing number of Canadians who travel to the US for healthcare unavailable to them right at home.

A ridiculous analogy.

How far back do you want to chain events?

It’s like complaining that someone said a sandwich is ‘delicious’ without thinking about the chicken who died and the miller who sweated while grinding the wheat.

Everything comes with a price. A sensible person is able to weigh and judge them.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The London Clinic was a great place to work with three great free meals a day with only a few hours of work because of the patient's needs.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Decadent UK..

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

it’s like complaining that someone said a sandwich is ‘delicious’ without thinking about the chicken who died and the miller who sweated while grinding the wheat.

Awesome analogy! I get it now!

Everything I said about the state of Canadian healthcare is incorrect and Canadians never had it so good.

Because the chicken and the miller thing!

(Why is heck did I not see that chicken and miller explanation before?? It clears everything up!)

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

The NHS has been a disaster for at least 15 years

Twelve of those years under the tories.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Meanwhile, above average earners pay 750€ worth of healthcare every month, which is more than American insurance costs.

How do you work that out? The UK spends about £2650 per person per year on health care. The US spends about £6780. (2019 data - see link below)

About 63% of the UK population are taxpayers. So the average UK taxpayer pays about £4500 per year towards health care - about £385 per month.

https://www.health.org.uk/news-and-comment/charts-and-infographics/taxes-and-health-care-funding-how-does-the-uk-compare

1 ( +1 / -0 )

About 63% of the UK population are taxpayers. So the average UK taxpayer pays about £4500 per year towards health care - about £385 per month.

That doesn't really make sense as there are sources of tax other than income tax. Nevertheless, I'm still wondering how you work out that above average earners pay 750€ per month. Are you only referring to way-above-average earners?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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