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Can the Taliban suppress the potent IS threat?

24 Comments
By SAMYA KULLAB

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24 Comments
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The Taliban will not be able to eliminate ISIS in Afghanistan. They will have less success at trying than the forces the Taliban replaced that had much better intel and technology at their disposal.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Not to be cynical, but if the are targeting Hazara in the country, not sure we should be too bothered.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Can the Taliban suppress the potent IS threat?

The Taliban can certainly appear to suppress any threat if the price is right -- $1 billion in aid and perhaps unfreezing the $10 billion in Afghan reserves in overseas accounts administered by Western governments.

https://www.dw.com/en/un-afghanistan-donor-conference-raises-1-billion-with-crisis-looming/a-59162904

0 ( +2 / -2 )

They are all the same. Why would they want to destroy their brothers?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

As long as the Afghan/Pakistan border is wide open, I don't see the IS being kept out. The Taliban's best hope might be to negotiate with the US and allow drone technology and other security tech to be used along the border, airports and other check points. The Taliban are in a crunch financially and so they'll either be forced back into the Stone Ages like pre-9/11 or they'll have to moderate considerably in order to gain access to foreign aid and technology.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@M.M. Exactly, right. Even if there are some local fights about some Afghan areas, their common enemy is the civilized West and any other so-called unbelievers, so finally they are united, and most other people don’t want to see or understand that.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Let's see, no money, a bunch of illiterate guys with guns, no legitimacy other than having guns and the willingness to use them indiscriminately and a foe even more sociopathic than Taliban.

I am going with "no."

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Most media blamed America for withdrawing its troops from Afgan bt it was best plan no more money to be wasted for hunting down they will kill each other though there will be innocent civilian casualties bt mostly it will b terrorist va terrorist

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Can the Taliban suppress the potent IS threat?

depending on what day it is and which group is getting the aid money, kind of the same group.

Enemies most of the time, but same end goals.

Who are the two groups?

The Taliban and Isis are both Sunni Islamist extremist groups seeking to form authoritarian states under strict Sharia law and prepared to use violence to achieve their aim.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Can the Taliban suppress the potent IS threat?

Well obviously we have to agree with the owners of this site. So I accept the Editor's answer because my opinion is opposite of it. Sorry for being offensive, vulgar, insinuating, and assuming fareness to nobody. You win.

What ever you want to project, I hope Allah is with you.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

IS emerged in Afghanistan in 2015 with the name Islamic State in Khorasan Province, at a time when the group was at its peak, controlling much of Iraq and Syria. It drew members from Afghan and Pakistani militants, including a wave of Taliban defectors.

There is the answer right there in the article.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Too much terror and violence in the old… at least when dictators like Sadam Hussian and Gaddafi were ruling there were no terror groups! It’s all up for grabs after their deaths and it’s one terrorist group after another causing complete chaos!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Even if there are some local fights about some Afghan areas, their common enemy is the civilized West and any other so-called unbelievers,

That shows a lack of understanding. The violence between competing interpretations of the Koran and sharia law is more important for some than any feelings towards unbelievers because as Muslims they should know better and they should follow "our correct" interpretation.

ISIS are worse than even the Taliban and have no respect for other Muslims as shown by continued suicide bombings of the innocent. The West is not a common enemy. The Taliban want good relations with the West where ISIS want to destroy the west and anyone, even moderate Muslims that stand in their way.

For some it would be in their interests to have the West targeted constantly so that others can operate under the radar. Perhaps the common enemy is the communism that continues to persecute Muslims in China and elsewhere.

The Taliban will have constant issues with terrorists of one denomination or another. They promised China, Russia, Europe and America they would stamp it out in Afghanistan but in the end all will find sanctuary in the vast mountains and Terrorist enclaves will support terror acts against their enemy of choice. The Taliban will have their hands full just paying bills and getting people fed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The payoffs that the Taliban were originally receiving from the US to calm down will now continue by releasing the current funds and aid little by little and allow any corrupt Taliban leader to skim off the top for themselves. The rest of the payoffs will trickle down. That is how the former Afghan government members got rich, and that is how the North Korean supreme leader has been able to have the finer things in life while his countrymen starved to death.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The IS threat? As opposed to the al-Qaeda threat? As opposed to the Taliban threat? Or any of the other Kalashnikov-bearing threats walking around the region right now?

You can't kick a rock over in Afghanistan without finding a threat to humanity.

The question becomes, how can the world deal with the many heavily armed factions in this most violent and unstable neighborhood?

Betting windows are now open, and the smart money seems to be riding on the world's diplomats buying off / bribing the threats, at least for awhile. Hoping beyond hope that the violence-addicted True Believers will learn just enough humanity in the interim to learn how to play nice in the international playground.

Safe money that the same diplomats will believe the token words of the Taliban just long enough to start shoveling in lots and lots of money. Just to keep the threats quiet and at bay, mind you. And to throw the women and girls of Afghanistan and the region into the most dire peril, at the hands of the True Believers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They are all the same. Why would they want to destroy their brothers?

Probably for the same reasons the IRA and the Irish Protestants were so gleefully blowing each other up during the Troubles. Both sides being Christian didn’t stop anything. It’s the same with ISIS and the Taliban. They are both ready the same book, but coming out the other end with very different interpretations. Hence the constant sectarian violence.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Isis is no imminent threat too the USA,they can plan and plot anywhere,but the US remaining in Afghanistan ,we should of left decades ago,a Predator drone is sufficient

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@M.M. Exactly, right. Even if there are some local fights about some Afghan areas, their common enemy is the civilized West and any other so-called unbelievers, so finally they are united, and most other people don’t want to see or understand that.

Not hardly. The groups have differing ideologies and highly fractured. Allegiances among warlords often depend on whomever has the most money or the most prestigious position to offer them. Like the CCP in China, do not fall into the trap of thinking they are seamless and all the same. The history of Afghanistan before the Taliban arrived should tell anyone this. All the different warlords fancy themselves as the most important person in the world and they are all competing against each other for power unless they have reached some sort of temporary alliance against a third warlord they both happen to fear.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The article ignores the possibility of intervention by the Tajiks Ethnic Tajiks are 27% of the Afghan population, the second largest ethnic group. In addition Uzbeks are another 9% of the Afghan population, both groups dominating the north and both groups dominating the resistance to the Taliban. The Tajiks have been mobilizing forces near the Afghan border and warning the Taliban about treatment of their Tajik population. The Tajiks are discussing setting up a shadow Afghan government in Dushanbe and Russia has said it will guarantee Tajikistan's security against the Afghans. The Tajiks also openly support the National Resistance Front. Uzbeks have a long tradition of fighting the Taliban, but that enmity makes many worry that Uzbek factions will support IS-K against the Taliban with rebels crossing the Afghan-Uzbek border. Complicating matters there are some Tajik militias operating in Afghanistan that seek to overthrow the current Tajik government.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One thing that the new government of Afghanistan has, that the American installed and controlled one didn't, is a need to maintain legitimacy in the eyes of the population of Afghanistan.

Which means they know they can't blow up innocents by the dozens and pass them off as the guilty, or even just a dozen because one is guilty.

Today's Taliban, fresh from being hunted by the Imperium, understand that while violence is a tool that is only effective when used carefully, diplomacy is a tool even more effective the more its used, even against those who diplomacy will never work on directly.

After all, they've had a front row seat as Iran used the tool of diplomacy against the irrationality of the US, and now are being diplomatically courted by almost the entirety of the Axis of Antidemocracies the US created in its efforts to crush Iran.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Is IS really a threat? No! Al Qaeda? No! They are creations of the Western secret services to create a boogeyman Islamic foe. We know for a fact Sept. 11 is a lie; ergo, Al Qaeda is a lie. The most important question left to consider is why did the US suddenly pull out? Started by a Republican president and actualized by a Democratic president. Same as Iraq: Bush to Obama. Talk about history repeating itself! Why? We shall see soon.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

We know for a fact Sept. 11 is a lie;

Yeah. The Twin Towers are just out picking up a gallon of milk and some cigarettes as we speak! They’ll be home any day now.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Taliban can not defeat the ISIS-K, who can not defeat the Taliban. The Afghans will be the victims between them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Probably for the same reasons the IRA and the Irish Protestants were so gleefully blowing each other up during the Troubles. Both sides being Christian didn’t stop anything.

There were actually precious few Christians among either side. Both sides in that war were the repudiation of all things Christian.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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