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Famed American sniper killed at Texas shooting range

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There is some irony in this.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

What's the saying, 'he who lives by the sword .......... ?

8 ( +17 / -9 )

I thought good guys with guns would shoot the bad guys with guns so nothing like this would ever happen ?

7 ( +16 / -9 )

He claimed 255 kills. But "only" had 160 kills. Live by the sword...

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Surely they have armed guards to guard the good guys with guns?

4 ( +10 / -6 )

It seems that Kyle was working to help other vets trying to readjust to life in the civilian world. Just a reminder that this whole thing is primarily about America's failure to properly manage those with mental health issues.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Wonder if his book had anything to do with getting sniped by a fellow sniper, at a gun range, mind you?

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Islamic terrorist?????

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

This sort of reminds me of Steve Irwin, the Australian zoologist who was killed by a sting ray. Combat experience turns some soldiers into deadly animals, and getting too close to them can be deadly.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

The man hailed as the deadliest military sniper in U.S. history has been shot to death at a Texas firing range, allegedly by a former soldier with post-traumatic stress disorder.

He wasn't the deadliest. I think someone was better.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

A suspect has been arrested, and was identified as 25-year-old Ed...

I wish the identities of suspects were withheld - if not as a matter of course, at least when it is believed that the person is suffering mental illness.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

USA Vs. UK

Tasers are used all the time in the US by Police. Civil rights groups that monitor Law Enforcement claim they use them too often.

I thought good guys with guns would shoot the bad guys with guns so nothing like this would ever happen ?

Surely they have armed guards to guard the good guys with guns?

Well seeing as it wasn't a mass shooting it seemed to have worked that everyone was armed........

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Live by the sword, die by the ....

So, this guy gave a mentally unstable guy a gun and was shot? Wow. If there is ever a case for gun control.... Why was this guy even allowed at a shooting range if he's suffering from PTSD? Foolish and now someone is dead because of it.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Well seeing as it wasn't a mass shooting it seemed to have worked that everyone was armed........

But there WAS a shooting and someone is dead, right? So how did that work out well for the victim who was armed?

2 ( +8 / -6 )

But there WAS a shooting and someone is dead, right? So how did that work out well for the victim who was armed?

Well in a surprise attack for the first and most likely only victim it sucks. For all the other potential victims well it saves their life.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Yet another psych failure.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Quit with the dumb "live by the sword, die by the sword" stupidity.

This guy was a hero.

There's nothing "ironic" about it.

He was trying to help the guy get over his PTSD. Doing a lot more than most people would, and he died doing it.

Show some respect.

-14 ( +4 / -18 )

This guy was a hero.

There's nothing "ironic" about it.

@Probie: This guy was a hero in the society (the giant with feet of clay) where you are obviously from. In the rest of the world somebody who whacks people for a living does not qualify to be a "hero." By the way who is not a hero in US of A?

11 ( +14 / -3 )

@Probie: This guy was a hero in the society (the giant with feet of clay) where you are obviously from. In the rest of the world somebody who whacks people for a living does not qualify to be a "hero." By the way who is not a hero in US of A?

I am ex military, but I'm not American.

It shows the level of your mentality when you call military "somebody who whacks people for a living".

And yes, he is a hero.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

nothing very heroic about hiding somewhere and sneakily shooting people..

6 ( +10 / -4 )

How ironic..... a case to put those guns away. Whats the threat to America anyway? Its all a hokes cooked up by the American Regime to scare teh people into complying.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I cannot see Chris Kyle as a hero. He killed people who were defending their country against an unjust invasion. He was not a conscript but a volunteer. He had no remorse for taking part in Bush's immoral war. Not a hero in my book.

Kyle had one redeeming aspect. He wanted to help his broken fellow vets. Ironically that is what killed him. Out of kindness he took a young Marine suffering from post traumatic stress syndrome to shooting range and the guy killed him and his neighbor.

Well, Kyle and a lot of nice Iraqis and Americans would still be alive were it not for Bush's immoral and useless wars.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Kabukilover - "I cannot see Chris Kyle as a hero. He killed people who were defending their country against an unjust invasion. He was not a conscript but a volunteer. He had no remorse for taking part in Bush's immoral war. Not a hero in my book."

Not a hero in mine either. All he is/was is a soldier who had very good aim and was very skilled at killing people.

Ie: he was very good at his job, in essence no different from a soccer player who is very good at scoring goals.

He'd have been a hero if he had saved lives, not taken them. 

It just goes to show the troubling mentality of some people when they label a skilled killer a 'hero.'

3 ( +6 / -3 )

one is paid to kill 'bad' people one did it for free...it's the only difference if you believe what the U.S. government tell you you need to read some more books.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Probie,

This guy was a hero.

No.

He killed more than 150 people.

He was a mass murderer.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Interesting.....war turns killers into state-sanctioned killers and successful killers into 'heroes' in some troubled minds.

Still killers.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Just a reminder that this whole thing is primarily about America's failure to properly manage those with mental health issues

Taking a person with PTSD out to a gun range displayed very poor judgment. Perhaps that is the biggest "mental health issue" here. Just as it was with Nancy Lanza leaving her guns accessible to her mental case of a son.

And just as it is with the NRA types and their steadfast refusal to support the kind of background checks that would screen out as many of these mental cases as possible.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

For all the other potential victims well it saves their life.

Do you actually have any stats or articles to back that up because I have stats that prove otherwise. More likely to die by a gun if you own a gun and all that jazz you seem to want to ignore.

This guy was a hero.

Thanks for the laugh. There is nothing heroic about hiding and taking up people who are unaware you are there. More so when you are in a country that isn't your own and you aren't defending said people, just your country's greed. You want a hero? Malala is a hero. This guy is not.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

The guy will release a book; "How I killed the deadliest sniper in US History."

0 ( +2 / -2 )

like all the U.S. military.

I disagree. Not all military guys think like this at all. There are some amazing American military guys that knew exactly what they do and don't dare suggest that someone like this guy is a hero. Shame that not everyone gets that though.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

The end of self-boosterism. A typical American story.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Men the U.S. military are pretty much brainwashed during training. They must believe what they are doing is honorable and morally just. Because most can't come to terms with the reality of exactly what they are doing when they kill people because they are following an order. This guy was not an Hero. He indeed lived and died by what he seemed to love. I'm glad most people here understand the difference between an hero and a trained govt. sanctioned murderer. A fire fighter is a hero. A doctor can be a hero. A soldier fighting for another country's resources is NOT a hero. (Oil)"

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

The majority of all people in the U.S. armed forces believe what they are doing is morally just. Even when the wars are not justified. U.S. soldiers are brainwashed heavily during ROTC enrollment as early as highschool.

If they cared about taking the life of another they would not go on to join the military in a position where they would be taking lives.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

This is apart of why they have PTSD. they develop mental illnesses from being "HEROS"

1 ( +5 / -4 )

A hero, quite simply, is a person who keeps going when anyone else would have reasonably quit, even though the final goal was a laudable one. While most people only acknowledge the most dramatic of these cases, it takes nothing away from those whose jobs are almost defined as an obligation to perform above and beyond the call of duty. The cop, the firefighter, and yes, the soldier, they are all heroes. Drawing a salary doesn't take away from that. I will not begrudge Chris Kyle that title, even if I haven't actually read about any of his exploits (I can only assume that everyone here claiming he isn't a hero have read it, and are comfortable that their own personal definition of the word has not been met).

However...I am no psychologist, and may possibly fall on the other side of the couch when it comes to that, but treating PTSD...at a firing range? Isn't there some sort of negative association or something going on there? Asides from the already mentioned inadvisability of giving a trained military person who has been diagnosed as clinically stressed and impulsive a loaded weapon?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

He died Saturday at a firing range in Glen Rose, Texas, while helping a soldier recovering

Psychotics that he took to recover in a firing range ? How can someone come with ideas like that ? It seems he was the sickest of them all.

And yes, he is a hero.

Yes, the hero of the tragedy. Curtain !

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It's awesome that you guys know some bible verses about swords but why not try and stick with John 3:16

There are a lot of people bashing him for his military service but the guy was really looking out for veterans in his own way. Something the US gov seems to be really inept at doing right now. Anyone that volunteers their freedom for a country even if it is a crappy one with citizens that calls them "mindless baby killers" has my respect more than a keyboard warrior any day.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The man was part of an illegal invasion of a country. Brainwashed into thinking is simple childish terms like "good guys" and "bad guys". The people he killed had families, many would have been trying to free their country from the illegal invaders ,many of which treated them like sub humans. The man was a cold bloody killer who said he had no remorse for any of his victims as they were bad guys. He was no hero, he was a victim just like all those he killed.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

A lot of these comments are misinformed and disgusting. They show both disrespect for a husband and father that was killed trying to help those suffering from PTSD and a woeful lack of understanding as what PTSD is.

For starters while PTSD is often linked to violent behavior via anecdotal evidence and the media the actual correlation is weak. PTSD does not require being even remotely close to violence, the person suffering from the disorder need only feel persistent symptoms of anxiety after they feel their security has been compromised by a real or perceived threat. Many soldiers develop PTSD without even being involved in ground operations and others develop it after experiencing natural disasters.

The chief symptoms of the disorder are reliving the event (which despite Hollywood portrayals almost never involved actual physical reliving, that only happens in the cases of those also suffering from a Traumatic Brain Injury), avoidance, hyper-vigilance (being easily startled and having trouble sleeping/relaxing), and anxiety. People suffering from PTSD are, in many cases, far more likely to avoid guns and any source of loud noises all together. They often seclude themselves which increases the likelihood that they will develop symptoms of depression and the chances of suicidal thoughts and behavior.

Taking a person with PTSD out to a gun range displayed very poor judgment. Perhaps that is the biggest "mental health issue" here.

Actually one of the most successful treatments for PTSD involves desensitizing those suffering from the disorder to the stressors that triggered it in the first place. Numerous centers that treat the disorder have actually built elaborate facilities including gun ranges and virtual reality simulations to allow them to reconstruct the events that triggered the disorder to give those suffering from it the opportunity to relive and analyze the situation. They do this dozens of times in order to normalize the situation so that it stops being a source of persisting anxiety.

Support groups such as the one Chris Kyle headed have actually helped tens of thousands of individuals cope with their disorder by giving individuals with PTSD the opportunity to be around their peers to talk about their symptoms while engaging in an activity that mimicks the effects of desensitization. It's also why a number of veterans engage in full scale battle re-enactments and on Mil-Sim airsoft and paintball teams.

Carolingium, tachibana, Kabukilover, SushiSake3, tmarie, Shiningfinger

Chris Kyle is a hero because he dedicated his life to service his country, supported and loved his family while being deployed numerous times, and subsequently spent years of his life helping his fellow soldiers to overcome they symptoms of a problematic and terribly misunderstood disorder. Many people in the military suffering from PTSD never seek treatment because individuals that label them as 'brainwashed' killers, perpetuating a stereotype and showing a gross disrespect for a man that attempted to help those in need.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Surely the whole point of "hero" is that it's personal. For some folk, Fidel Castro is a hero, for others, Margaret Thatcher would be a better choice. There's no such thing as an objective "hero".

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

My friend Allen Nelson, a US Marine in Vietnam said it best, that the US military trains you to become desensitized to killing. Yes, to be a murderer. Was this man a murderer?Were those he helped also murderers? Yes, to both questions. But they are also victims...in the military for whatever reasons..because they believed they were defending their country, because it was the best chance to get an education, in Allan's time because they were drafted and had no choice. Was their PTSD real? You bet. They are victimis who also played the role of victimizer. And Allan realized the reality, he suffered from PTSD. He spent his last years talking peace. He succumbed to cancer just a few years ago, and he was courageous in confronting the monster that the military turns you into. He said to me that he was trained to shoot people in the leg, not the heart, so they would scream and writhe in pain, so they could attract others--civilians, suspected "Viet Cong"--and then shoot them in cold blood. It is not either/or. The killers we become in service to empire leaves us violated as well. Maybe he was doing a real service for these traumatized ex soldiers, but being proud of what he did in the war, that to me shows a serious flaw...one that the military was no doubt grateful for--a soldier who could inflict death and not be afflicte with self doubt. PTSD is a same response to what these soldiers were forced to go through. And they are not ultimately culpable...it is those who put them in harm's way. Those who concocted the plans to drop atomic bombs, napalm, Agent Orange (produced by our beloved Monsanto, with their GMO seeds), those who turned it into a safer game with their drones, where the stench of death....whether "enemy" or child ("collateral damage")....is undetectable from so far away....those are the ones who are getting away with murder, while the hired hands do the killing and then have their own lives turned inside out by guilt and PTSD.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

killing more than 150 insurgents

or 160 ??? Is just wild beyond belief...

American gun culture need to be changed... Another example in why people should not own handguns or assault weapons.

Psychological counseling at a gun range is NOT affective treatment.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The Q,

Another well thought-out post.

I actually disagree with the man's appellation of "hero", though I agree with you that there are some of our far-out liberal posters comments that seem particularly disparaging, especially in light of the way he died.

Kyle made money writing books out of his exploits from killing people for the US government and having his name at the top of the "legitimate" assassins leader-board, even claiming a higher number of kills than his official tally. This is pure bravado over death in my opinion, no matter how legitimate the kills may have been. This is why he is no hero, despite other well needed and admirable charitable deeds.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Actually one of the most successful treatments for PTSD involves desensitizing those suffering from the disorder to the stressors that triggered it in the first place. Numerous centers that treat the disorder have actually built elaborate facilities including gun ranges and virtual reality simulations

Precisely, there exist medical centers, professional therapists, virtual simulations, guns that shoot blanks. So WTF super-sniper and his neighbor (probably as qualified) make a mental patient play with loaded automatic guns in a public shooting range ? Surprising they didn't take him to some Disneyland park with a toy shooting range...

They show both disrespect for a husband and father

His victims were somebody's son, brother, father, husband, best friend that were defending themselves against an attack, it's even likely some were civilians including little kids. And they got what respect from the super-hero and from people that worship him? Kyle will be remembered as a j*rk that wrote a book about his pride and joy to have shot over 200 persons. He is at the same level as the Japanese soldiers that wrote in a paper that they were making a competition in Nanking about who will kill the more.

he dedicated his life to service his country because individuals that label them as 'brainwashed' killers, perpetuating a stereotype

You don't understand that characters (heroes if you want) like Kyle are doing a huge disservice to the US. They make US servicemen, and all Americans behind them, get the stereotype of Rambos that shoot the natives as if that was the olympic ball-trap.

Routh is a former Marine who is believed to suffer from PTSD.

I hope this guy gets real care at last, and no jail time.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"I hope this guy gets real care at last, and no jail time"

I imagine he'll be lucky to avoid the death penalty. It's Texas.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No matter what you think about war, or the guys who fight them, show some respect.

A guy has done the war, so after that he has all the rights ?

Some of the comments on here are disgusting.

And Kyle's book is not disgusting ? You'd say what about the J-guys that were in Pearl Harbor writing the same crap ? Go to tell them "Hey brave war hero, you killed my grand-dad, can I have an autograph ?".

0 ( +2 / -2 )

There are really two sides to this person and I really wanted to see the Ventura lawsuit go thru.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2TdoAJ3wzg

Both of the parties seemed to be telling the truth on the "incident" but Ventura was a UDT and had Seal training -never an active Seal) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tT0Gz5mIIgg

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/crime/headlines/20130203-chris-kyle-record-holding-sniper-as-navy-seal-killed-in-double-slaying-at-erath-county-gun-range.ece

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Live by the Sword, Die by the Sword.... er, gun.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Do you actually have any stats or articles to back that up because I have stats that prove otherwise. More likely to die by a gun if you own a gun and all that jazz you seem to want to ignore.

I haven't ignored anything, those states about being more likely to die by your own gun is completely irrelevant to incident that is being discussed here, that would be like more bringing up the stat that more soldiers die by suicide than are killed in combat in Afghanistan and claiming that is relevant to this specific incident. Well lets see here if the shooter was to attempt to engage more targets most likely after the first victim fell the other armed people at the range would begin to shoot back at the shooter. Now if those same targets were not armed the shooter most likely would have been able to get more kills because the potential victims don't have the means of giving an effective resistance. In fact I'm willing to bet that the everyone else being armed at the gun range was exactly why the shooter fled immediately after his first shot rather than sticking around.

If you want stats than just look law enforcement or military operations. By your argument if I'm just one person and I do an ambush on 50 soldiers that don't have body armor but are armed and after the first target falls, that is if I hit my first target, the other 49 soldiers that are armed should just give up and not fight back because there is just no way their guns would save their life right?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

For starters while PTSD is often linked to violent behavior via anecdotal evidence and the media the actual correlation is weak.

Well, it looks like 25-year-old Eddie Rauth just helped to strengthen the correlation a bit.

Taking a person out to a gun range when the mental health diagnosis isn't fully understood is using pretty bad judgment. Better to stick with virtual reality simulations.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I would not call a sniper a hero, however I admit that I prefer snipers to done missile attacks in that he pinpoints the person he is killing and does not have as much collateral damage as a drone attack. The idea of some young kid in the United States being tuned loose to fly a drone and make decisions about whether he should kill people is insane to me and he will feel nothing no responsibility for playing what to him is just another computer game.

By the way we will are using those drones here in our country and I wonder if they will be armed, no matter what our government tells us.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Were the Allied snipers in WWII cowards as well?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You can brain wash yourself to an all American hero, or jump on the "other side" and join Al Qaeda and say you are killing innocent people in the name of Jihad, etc...in the end it is ALL violence, it is all KARMA, so people talking about living by the sword, by the gun, by using violence and well what goes around goes around, this guy got it right there at a gun shooting range, just surprised this does not happen MORE OFTEN, all you have to do is point your gun, rifle etc..to the guy next to you instead of random far away target, right??

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Were the Allied snipers in WWII cowards as well?

Actually believe it or not but Snipers were not respected in WW2 they were considered a necessary "coward" it wasn't until the Vietnam war did the sniper stop being viewed as a coward, at least in the US eyes. In fact when the US entered the Vietnam war it had no sniper/sharp shooting schools. Almost all of the sharp shooting/sniper schools the US does have were formed after the Vietnam War.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Cos,

Precisely, there exist medical centers, professional therapists

I'd be willing to bet that this guy had had plenty of "professional" therapy.

It obviously wasn't very effective, was it?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Superlib,

Were the Allied snipers in WWII cowards as well?

It used to make my grandfather really, really angry.

And he thought the change from a red uniform to camouflage before WWI was cowardice.

"A soldier should stand up with pride, in a uniform that shows that he is a soldier. Not hide in a ditch and take pot shots at people."

I agree with him. Being a sniper is nothing to be proud of.

But it's even worse these days isn't it?

Bush started and (so he believed) finished the Iraq war from an office several thousand miles away. He didn't even get his boots wet!

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

The idea that a sniper is a coward stems from the equally ludicrous idea that war is a noble effort carried out by brave people.

In reality, war is when your brothers with whom you have been training with for years suddenly get ripped apart by bullets. At that point, only an idiot would refuse sniper support to avoid being saved by a "coward". You aren't in the middle of that firefight because you bravely set forth to right a wrong; you are there because your job required you to be there, and right now, you want to get your friends (and, ideally, yourself) out of there alive (again, just as the job requires). Neither bravery nor cowardice have any stake here.

The pride of being a soldier needs to be saved for when you are marching home in the parades. Pride in the battlefield tends to be more of a liability than anything else. Referring to a soldier, a man who has spent months in a war zone aggressively engaging the enemy, as a coward does little more than show how willing you are to utterly disrespect someone's achievements simply because they don't match your politics.

Apologies to those who call him a coward based on their own experience behind enemy lines and their evaluation of his performance under fire; Your opinion does actually have merit. Those armchair moralists, whose greatest challenge to their ideals comes from an internet forum, they need to shut it. If you weren't on the ramp, you don't get to make the call.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Wars are not pretty, nobody comes back "normal" from any wars, you kill or your friends are killed etc...it is a messy thing to be in wars, I have seen plenty of vets, they do not want to talk about it to non vets, but if we think wars are PRETTY like with RAMBO and all that other BS, keep on dreaming! So I do feel sorry for all of these people who have the misfortune to end up in horrible situations like this.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Precisely, there exist medical centers, professional therapists, virtual simulations, guns that shoot blanks. So WTF super-sniper and his neighbor (probably as qualified) make a mental patient play with loaded automatic guns in a public shooting range ?

FITCO Cares and other such organizations often partner with VA facilities or veterans clubs. For FITCO specifically they also do group events and movies. Obviously not every regional hospital is going to have staff trained to support veterans with PTSD let alone willing and able to observe and assist in a firing range. Groups such as FITCO are extraordinarily valuable assets to have. Also, having a well known veteran like Chris Kyle as a front man for the organization likely makes veterans more comfortable talking than they would speaking to a therapist.

You don't understand that characters (heroes if you want) like Kyle are doing a huge disservice to the US. They make US servicemen, and all Americans behind them, get the stereotype of Rambos that shoot the natives as if that was the olympic ball-trap.

Kyle did his job, received an honorable discharge to spend time with his family, and then spent his time helping his fellows. That hardly sounds like Rambo.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@El

You can brain wash yourself to an all American hero, or jump on the "other side" and join Al Qaeda and say you are killing innocent people in the name of Jihad, etc...in the end it is ALL violence, it is all KARMA, so people talking about living by the sword, by the gun, by using violence and well what goes around goes around, this guy got it right there at a gun shooting range, just surprised this does not happen MORE OFTEN, all you have to do is point your gun, rifle etc..to the guy next to you instead of random far away target, right??

Sometimes, you just totally perplex me. Karma??? The man was doing his job in the field, to protect his men or the allied forces that could and would kill them and especially him. He was a repeated target for assassination by Al Quida and other groups. So what was he supposed to do? He was a soldier, that was his job: to engage the enemy, I think you totally don't get it. He wasn't on a mission to kill innocent people. He tried to help a fellow Marine who was suffering from PTSyndrome get back on his feet and then in the process gets shot. Absolutely tragic.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Exactly, the man was a soldier that was doing his job (which to clarify was to stop or ultimately kill enemy soldiers from doing their duties during a war. Although the war hero description is POV only, he is a hero for trying to help others with PTSD. He is not a murderer as so many pacifists would love to perceive as he was a soldier whose job is to protect the pacifists from fighting in his place.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

http://www.roughcreek.com/

A big country club at 3:15pm on a busy Saturday and nobody saw the shooting. Sounds like a very fishy story to pin on a veteran.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If they cared about taking the life of another they would not go on to join the military in a position where they would be taking lives.

Oh that is rich!! If they didn't care then wouldn't have helped in the earthquake and tsunami efforts here in Japan. When Haiti earthquake disaster hit that thrust them into the chasm of poverty and disorder. Many may not realize just how much the military contributed to the medical issues that were front and center. This effort did not end when the news coverage went away, and tens of thousands of Haitians continued to be treated for medical issues at various sites around the Island. The patients not only receive medications but also public health information to help them help themselves in a sustainable way. The medical teams generally consist of military family practice providers, internal medicine doctors, pediatricians, women's health specialists, dentist and optometrists. On the other side of the world, Operation Africa Lion provided medical care in Morocco. Which gave medical care to five villages as part of the Humanitarian and Civic Assistance portion of the exercise.

In the Philippines, Operation Balikatan is a recurrent joint mission in which the US Army surgeon's and the Armed Forces of the Philippines Nurse Corps work together to exchange the latest medical advances including advanced cardiac life support skills, tactical nurse combat care and treatment of blast trauma. Humanitarian assistance projects are a part of that effort in the surrounding communities where free medical, dental and veterinary care are offered. In addition to the medical support, the military engineers build and repair schools and contribute to other civic projects in these poor communities. Most impressive is the US Military's Humanitarian Mission Dire Dawa in Ethiopia. Not saying it's perfect but to claim if people cared they wouldn't join the military is shameful and insensitive and shows a lack of knowing how military operations are carried out.

Furthermore how many of you have ever been in the military? Let alone know what vets go though and how the government treats them. If want to blame someone, blame the damn VA and how they can't ever seem to get their act together. If you admit you have nightmares about combat (part of the PTSD diagnosis), the doctor will see you once a month. 1st month, orientation. 2nd month, base line. 3rd month, mama issues and per-military problems. 4th month, what you did in the military. 5th month, what is the problem. So, long story short, after many months of waiting to get approved for psychological help. It takes a minimum of 5 months from the 1st psychologists visit before the psychologist asks you why you are sitting in their office. The 5 months combined with the 4-6 months of waiting to hear if you can go to the doctor is way longer than it takes a person to snap.

The VA cannot treat the Veteran with just six counseling sessions and expect Veterans to be cured who are suffering from PTSD. Their goal is to steer Veterans to continue seeking help else where. This is not treatment, rather handing the responsibility else where. Sounds like somewhere else I know! Military needs to take each individual soldier and evaluate thoroughly and get them the help they need. This story is tragic for all involved. I don't blame our service men and women for doing what they are asked to do. The real problem here is the government not taking metal health problems more seriously and just expecting vets to suck it up. Thumb me down if you want but Japan as well has it's own problems with not taking mental health issues more seriously. It's a growing problem which is only going to get worse before it gets better if things don't change.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The US soldiers didn't help out of the kidness of their hearts in their freetime. They were ordered there by the powers that be. Many US military guys think they are protecting freedom and the homeland but they are in fact fighting to help the unelected elite remain in control.

Of course most soldiers care but they have been duped like these guys traumatised and given little help after serving.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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