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FBI director outraged by Lockerbie bomber's release

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Don't like othe nations laws, yeah? Well that is tough.

You have your own barbaric justice system in the US which includes torture and state sanctioned murder. Those ideals went away long ago in freedom loving Britain.

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Don't like othe nations laws, yeah? Well that is tough.

Doubt you would feel the same if a member of your family had been blown up and the killer was sent home to recieve a hero's welcome because he will probably die in the next couple months. Barbaric actions should merit barbaric consequences, unfortunatly most criminals never receive an ounce of what is due to them.

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No, i was taught forgivness. That is what my countries law works on. It must be applied to all and respected by all.

I mean as the god fearing Americans always tell us "What would Jesus have done?"

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Aren't the British people ashamed of the way their government strong-arms the Scottish justice system and trades prisoners for BP oil contracts??

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Aren't the British people ashamed of the way their government strong-arms the Scottish justice system and trades prisoners for BP oil contracts??

It would be much better if they allowed some other country on the other side of the pond to strong-arm the British justice system?

I'm not sure if I agree with the release of this particular prisoner (not having all the facts to hand) but I am sure the British justice system should not be influenced by the emotions of people whose own 'justice' system allows rich people to buy themselves a not guilty verdict, gives poor people state-appointed lawyers who sleep through the case, has a greater proportion of its population behind bars than any other country and thinks the death penalty is a good thing.

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The british sold out the west for oil and business rights in libya. Always knew we couldn't trust those limes.

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Oil for mass murderers.Fills me with disgust.

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Cold-blooded murderers like al-Megrahi don't deserve compassion. They should stay in jail until their victims stop being dead.

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Cat5; We don't have limes in Britain lad. The deal had nothing to do with oil, that is Fox news propaganda, which will be proved by future revelations.

I also garee with the lass Cleo.

Why is it when the Americans can't get their own bloodthirsty way they wail like babies?

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Neil, your sweet double talk won’t change our opinion. Just accept it your scrawny island has now resorted to cutting deals with pathetic third world terrorist countries. Congratulations man!

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The guy is going to die. Give him peace and dignity you revenge seeking Americans. I thought you all believed in the New testament where Jesus forgives, not the old , or are all the posters here from America atheist or of another denomination?

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No, i was taught forgivness. That is what my countries law works on. It must be applied to all and respected by all.

Really? Most law systems operate under the concept of justice, working on forgivness sounds like something best left to the monks.

I mean as the god fearing Americans always tell us "What would Jesus have done?"

I always thought that that statement very well may fall under heresy in presuming that one is on the same level of spiritual enlightenment as Jesus but as it stands I am a man of substance and 8 years in prison for killing 270 innocent civilians is less than substantial.

I thought you all believed in the New testament where Jesus forgives, not the old , or are all the posters here from America atheist or of another denomination?

Once again Jesus is Jesus, I am not nor do I presume to be. And anyway, the man didn't kill anyone I know so I'm really not in any position to forgive him. What I can do is gawk at this blatent affront to justice.

No matter how you spin it the man's release is still a blight and the idea that this man was allowed to go home to hundreds of supporters, although fans would seem more appropriate, and then eventually die surrounded by friends and family in direct contrast with they hellish way that his victums were murdered is simply abominable.

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TheQuestion: Bill O'Reilly is on telly soon. You can learn some more of his and Hannit'y remarks to parrot on here.

If you don't like British law, tough. Don't try and impose your draconian system where the rich ie; Jackson are found innocent, whereas 50% of the prison population are non white and you endorse state sanctoned murde.

The man was realeased for compasionate reasons, that has been a part of British law for a while.

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Bill O'Reilly is on telly soon. You can learn some more of his and Hannit'y remarks to parrot on here.

Please don't presume to know my t.v. viewing prefrences. You only make yourself sound silly, and in all actuality I don't watch the news that much, very depressing, so I tend to either come here or go to reuters...but I digress.

Don't try and impose your draconian system

You must truely think the world of me to believe that I have the money or political clout nessicary to impose my views on the british justice system. No, I'm merely voicing my concern at sending a convicted mass murderer to a country where he is loved by the many. I could have almost bought the compasionate grounds garbage if not for the fact that his family had a perfectly good temporary home in Glasgow where he could kick the bucket surrounded by his family. But instead he was sent to Libya to a hero's welcome just in time to celebrate the country's 40th anniversary, give television interviews, and chat a while with the Leader and Guide of the Revolution Gaddafi. That trancends compassion and boarders on decedence.

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Neil, just as you don't like people criticizing your justice system and punishments Americans don't care what you think of the death penalty so that remains an American matter so your opinion on that is just as moot as you claim American opinion on this release is. And that goes for Cleo too. After she did what she said Americans can't do. And finally I didn't read any "right wing rubbish" as you put it? When did this become political? It's just many people's opinion of a premature release. You on the other hand seem to revel in the fact that Americans are so upset about this. Your hypocrisy and British attitude is showing mate. I urge you to seek out British victims of horrible crimes and find out their opinions of a light sentence on the ones responsible for the crimes against them. Then maybe you will be smart enough to understand why the American posters on here are posting the things they do unless your hatred of Americans is much too strong to cloud your judgement. You'll just have to take in a footy game at the local stadium to blow off some steam and bloody someone's nose and maybe trample a few to death to get out all the frustration.

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The FBI says something, the CIA says something, the US Government says something, and the whole world should shiver and atone. Gimme a break. The bomber is a dead man walking. And let the Scots decide where he walks from now.

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I thought it took forever to convict al-Megrahi. Now he walks away. Disgusting. < :-)

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adaydream; He was not even guilty lad, it was proved in a documentary and by Private Eye magazine. Give the geezer a break. He was the fall guy for bigger fish, anf to all you ngung ho Americans , thats a fact!!!

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Back to the bible again? What a strange world.

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Limey justice emboldens terrorists.

Moderator: Please refrain from using the word "limey."

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theQuestion: "What I can do is gawk at this blatent affront to justice."

It's funny how many on here mistake 'justice' for 'revenge'. As I said the other day, the problem with the word 'justice' is that people apply what they THINK it should mean; in this case, people calling for the man's head and saying nonsense like, "when his victims come back to life, he can THEN walk", etc. They want an eye-for-an-eye Old Testament-style revenge. That's not justice.

The man's about to die. If he is indeed guilty of what he did, then it is grossly unfair, but then that's what makes some people so much better, and more human, than this monster -- they are showing him the compassion he could show no one, and I hope in his last moments he sees that and how completely wrong he was to do what he did.

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seiji: "Limey justice emboldens terrorists."

Actually, immature statements like yours reflect the true attitude that emboldens terrorists, and the fact that bombast like yours is the kind of mentality they can best relate to.

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The geezer is nearly dead for crying out loud. Let him die with dignity!!!!!!!!!

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"Let him die with dignity!!!!!!!!!"

Well, I don't know about letting it get that far. Letting him die around family, though, is more than enough.

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I just don't buy the "compassion" argument. Doctor's estimates about cancer are guesses at best. I'm also curious as to how many other Scottish prisoners have been released under the same circumstances.

My guess is that one of two things happened. Either they had doubts about his guilt and decided to play the compassion card to avoid admitting a mistake, or they did it for oil/money. But I don't believe they did it on the grounds of compassion because they really think he has 3 months to live.

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SuperLib; Hundreds of elderly or terminally ill prisoners are released yearly in th UK, Reg Kray nad recently Ronnie Biggs are 2 examples.

There is no conspiracy here about oil, etc.. It is standard British (and Scottish) law.

From the evidence i've seen, i would actually believe the poor man is an innocent pawn.

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Oh, how they (the FBI and the US government) hate it when the boot is on the other foot. Mueller's little rant is hypocrisy at it's height. Here is an establishment (the FBI and the US government) preaching to the Scottish courts about a 'mockery of the rule of law'. The very same organisation that used it's diplomatic channels and economic bargaining power to kidnap almost 700 'suspects' and fly them off to Guantanamo Bay without any 'rule of law' applied. Here is Mueller talking about a 'detriment to the cause of justice' when the US is responsible for an illegal political prison that even their new president wants to shut down because it has caused so much embarrassment to the US.

And why does the rest of the world have to jump when American lives are lost ? There were 52 British citizens who were killed as well, 11 of them on the ground.

And the biggest joke here are the posters defending Mueller and making statements about 'blood for oil' ! How laughable is that ! From a nation (the US) that illegally (ask the Secretary General of the United Nations) invaded Iraq and is responsible for the loss of over 1 million lives for...wait for it...yes, the availability of oil for the US my friends. This little PR exercise from the director of the FBI should be treated as sheer hypocrisy. Blood for oil ? Who are you all trying to kid ?

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He also sent copies to the families of the Lockerbie victims.

Like I said, a PR exercise from Mueller. Now try a million copies of a letter apologising for the deaths in Iraq. Or 700 copies of a letter saying sorry to the political prisioners secretly flown to Guantanamo.

Moderator: Stay on topic please.

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"The geezer is nearly dead for crying out loud. Let him die with dignity!!!!!!!!!"

270 people did not get to die with dignity, because of that bastard.

Boycott Scotland.

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notrthlondon you love the US anger. I'd even wager a guess that you'd be willing to let a terrorist go free as long as it makes the US angry. You just strike me as that type of person.

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SuperLib, unfortunately you cannot judge a person and their opinions from an internet chat site. I personally disagree with letting this guy go free. But Scottish law is Scottish law and you must respect that. To be quite honest SuperLib, most people (including on this chat site) with some form of education and a balanced perspective on world affairs, are sick of the two-facedness coming from the FBI and the US government. Crying foul over US deaths when Iraqi and Afghani civilians are bombed on a regular basis would be almost laughable if it weren't for the severity of the Lockerbie bombing itself. Before you go judging other people and other cultures Mr Mueller and SuperLib, concentrate on the mirror in front of you first.

Moderator: Readers, references to Iraq and Afghanistan are not relevant to this discussion.

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Neil: Inbetween watching Fox News get out into nthe real wolrd. The majority of lawyers that have looked at this mansconviction believe him to be innocent.

Then you must be furious with the Scottish authorities for convicting an innocent man. Is this typical of the European justice system?

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northlondon: are sick of the two-facedness coming from the FBI and the US government.

Methinks your constant references to Iraq and Afghanistan are the cause of your anger, and you don't particularly care that Americans were killed on the Lockerbie bombing because they were Americans. You said yourself that he shouldn't have been released, yet you only want to talk about the US and Iraq. Why is that? You're telling me that you don't think a convicted terrorist should have been released and you won't even offer more than a few words on it and just rehash the same "American hypocrisy" argument that you've probably repeated dozens of times.

Moderator: Readers, references to Iraq and Afghanistan are not relevant to this discussion.

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Then you must be furious with the Scottish authorities for convicting an innocent man.

Yes, that is precisely the sentiment that the majority of the British public, not to mention many of the the victims' families have been attempting to get accross. The day he heard he was being released he dropped his appeal.

By releasing him on compassionate grounds MacAskill has done the British and American Governments a favour as it has silenced the growing call to hold an independent review into the unsafe conviction and uncover the reasons why the Scottish Courts may have carried out such a massive miscarriage of justice in the first place.

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It may be hard for some to accept (me included) but al-Megrahi was almost certainly framed by the CIA.

There were two main pieces of evidence against him... a fragment of a circuit board for the bomb timer, found in a Scottish forest and a Maltese shopkeeper who testified that al-Megrahi had bought the clothes that were in the suitcase containing the bomb.

The fragment of circuit board was placed in the forest by the CIA, probably with help of the British secret service. An engineer for the company who made the circuit board was paid money to supply it. There are many irregularities surrounding this piece of evidence.

As for the Maltese shopkeeper, he was paid a fortune by the Americans for his evidence and apparently now lives the life of Riley in Australia.

Just read up about it on the internet. The more you read the more incredible it seems that al-Megrahi could ever have been convicted. There are so many unexplained and downright suspicious aspects, especially in regard to the Swiss company that made the circuit board.

To it me it seems likely that Flight 103 was blown out of the skies by the Iranians in retaliation for the Americans shooting down Iran Air Flight 655. The Americans probably accepted this retaliation but still needed someone brought to justice. For various reasons Libyans fitted the bill.

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SuperLib: "notrthlondon you love the US anger. I'd even wager a guess that you'd be willing to let a terrorist go free as long as it makes the US angry. You just strike me as that type of person."

And YOU are the type of person who can do nothing but misdirect his own anger and frustrations, as is evident from your comments on this site. Someone points out that it is Scottish law and you claim they are the type to want terrorists to go free just to upset the US. Someone calls it compassion and you throw out a challenge to find out who else has been let go on 'compassionate grounds', and when concrete examples are given to you you get angry again and go off topic. Someone argues with you and you claim, "...and you don't particularly care that Americans were killed on the Lockerbie bombing because they were Americans".

Again, you are misdirecting your own errors, anger, and frustration on the Scottish courts, and in turn on posters for suggesting the courts did indeed let him go on compassionate grounds. But this is typical of your recent posting. I'm just surprised you haven't yet said that non-Americans can't have a say on the issue (would be illogical, given the topic, but that hasn't stopped you before).

You are right about one thing: doctors don't know 100% about cancer, but they are more often right than wrong when someone is near death from it. Or do you have stats showing us the percentage of ALL 'terminal cancer patients' who have made recoveries proves otherwise?

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Well,it really is just TOO funny how the usual haters have come here to rear their heads in an ugly fashion simply BECAUSE the accused is from a Muslim nation and the victims of his alleged crimes were American. Law enforcement professionals and the FBI and the US government are talking about justice, as if their work gives them some special insight into crime or something. Well, therein lies the rub, my friends.Justice varies from one person to another.So, we can't really say what justice is.

Of course,some winger will probably think he is clever by pointing out that if that is so then how can we know what injustice is,but hey,NUANCE always has been in short supply with the righties.

Of course, Scottish law is based on Christian ethics so I guess that also makes the few remaining bush supporters here think they can criticize this incredibly humanitarian,compassionate move.Besides,said ethics aren't my own.I believe more in karma.And in his next life I think this guy will be in for heaps of adversity.He definitely won't be flying first class,if you get my drift.

President Obama:The decision was “highly objectionable.”

Sorry bud, it is highly compassionate, as the accused faces end-of-life issues, in a foreign country, away from his family.It would be terrible if he could never see them again before dying.But kudos for the way you modified the word objectionable.

Well, anyways, my sincerest,deepest,most heartfelt cyber condolences to all the people who survived the passengers that went down on the Maid of the Skies when it was blown out of the air.

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President Obama:The decision was “highly objectionable.”

His comment wasn't on the decision to send the man back; it was the 'hero's welcome' he received that he found objectionable. Not far removed from the reaction of the UK government.

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Hopefully in light of this, the British government would finally open a public inquiry to get to the bottom of the 2005 London terror bombings. There are inconsistencies that make it seem those bombers were just patsies too.

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He was not even guilty lad, it was proved in a documentary and by Private Eye magazine.

Thats like saying that the SUN proved that paul newman's ashes are the source of eternal life.

It's funny how many on here mistake 'justice' for 'revenge'. As I said the other day, the problem with the word 'justice' is that people apply what they THINK it should mean; in this case, people calling for the man's head and saying nonsense like, "when his victims come back to life, he can THEN walk", etc. They want an eye-for-an-eye Old Testament-style revenge. That's not justice.

To assume I'm out for revenge would require me to be personaly effected by the bombing. As it stands I was not. I don't believe that serving 8 years for killing 270 is justice, not by a long shot, for that many deaths its hard to think of justice would be but whatever justic is this certainly is not .

The man's about to die. If he is indeed guilty of what he did, then it is grossly unfair, but then that's what makes some people so much better, and more human, than this monster -- they are showing him the compassion he could show no one, and I hope in his last moments he sees that and how completely wrong he was to do what he did.

I could care less if the man has this grand epiphany of regret, his victums are no less dead, he would be no less guilty, nor would he be any less surrounded by friends, family, and a supportive public when he croaks. Most normal people don't get to experience anything near that kind of comfort when they die let alone a mass murderer.

They could have let him kick it in Glasglow with his family, that should have been enough, but they sent him to what is essentially a national party in his honor.

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They want an eye-for-an-eye Old Testament-style revenge. That's not justice.

I don't know about that. It has a lot of benefits to it that many tend to overlook, no expensive prison system, less incentive to commit crimes, overall it could really trim the budget if we imprisoned people less and beat them more. Assault merits a thorough thrashing and compensation, a robbery merits the seizure of property and compensation, it would make so much sense as opposed to feeding, clothing, and providing shelter to people that aren't worth the clothes on their backs. Such a gross expenditure of resources.

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TheQuestion: "To assume I'm out for revenge would require me to be personaly effected by the bombing."

Where did I say YOU directly were out for revenge? And regardless of whether I was saying you were (are) or not, you constantly throw out the 'won't bring back the dead' stuff, which means you are offering up your opinion of what is justice on their behalf -- ie. revenge.

"As it stands I was not."

And yet: "I could care less if the man has this grand epiphany of regret, his victums are no less dead, he would be no less guilty,"

Once AGAIN you bring up and speak on behalf of the dead. You seem to be confused and sending out mixed messages. On the one hand you're not 'affected', and on the other you've become judge and jury.

"I don't believe that serving 8 years for killing 270 is justice, not by a long shot, for that many deaths its hard to think of justice would be but whatever justic is this certainly is not ."

I agree, and if the man were not in critical condition and about to die, I would insist that he should spend the remainder of his life behind bars -- and I'm sure the British agreement had that in mind. As it is, the man is dying after 8 years in prison. He'll be dead in a few months... call that justice enough, if you like. It's unfortunate that he gets to have an end that his victims (if he is indeed guilty) could not have, but again if you or others want to be as bad as him and have your eye-for-an-eye, feel free to say so -- as it is the British system is more compassionate, and more human.

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TheQuestion: "It has a lot of benefits to it that many tend to overlook..."

Look, if you make a person who breaks a window fix it by hand, or even break HIS/HER window as recompense it may not be that bad (someone still has to break YOUR window, unless it was yours that was originally broken), but someone who executes a murderer is no less a murderer. Bottom line. It may save the taxpayers money, you can argue, but it's not 'justice'. Keep in mind, the people who brought down the plane in question claim justice as well, or in all likelihood given that the people who commit terrorist acts claim they are justified in doing so (again, I say that the word 'justice' is used and abused).

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You said yourself that he shouldn't have been released, yet you only want to talk about the US and Iraq. Why is that?

He should not have been released/ I am not a High Court Judge, nor do I pretend to be one, therefore I have to respect Scottish law, which is probably one of the more advanced laws in the world today.

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One of the main virtues of Christianity is forgiveness (not that the Lockerbie bomber should be granted much forgiveness by the families of the deceased). The Scottish courts decided, in a very Christian manner, that this guy should be released to his family early because he is about to drop dead in a few months. The US government are opposed to this move, despite preaching to their electorate (particularly during election time) about Christian values.

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someone who executes a murderer is no less a murderer.

Maybe morally or cosmically but not legaly.

Keep in mind, the people who brought down the plane in question claim justice as well, or in all likelihood given that the people who commit terrorist acts claim they are justified in doing so .

Then we will have to pursue this vicious circle of justification to the unavoidable end which still will not determine who is right... only who is left.

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northlondon: Iraq IS relevant to this article because

...because you're angry about it so you're going to express that anger in any and all future topics involving the US. Let's call a spade a spade, shall we?

You posted one sentence to say that you disagree with this man being released, which is the actual topic at hand, yet you've added multiple paragraphs of information about Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Don't come here and tell me that you actually care about this man or this situation beyond it's ability to bring up your anger about other topics. Your actions have proven otherwise. Your frustration has created a one-track mind with all paths leading to an indictment of the US. You're one-dimensional. Just accept it, have a beer, and get some sleep.

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Then we will have to pursue this vicious circle of justification to the unavoidable end which still will not determine who is right... only who is left.

Once again allow me to clarify. I was speaking in reguards of the U.S pursueing terrorists, who pursue the U.S, who pursue the terrorists. To that end I would like to point out that an such acts of terrorism are acts of terrorism because they attack civilians and not military or logistical targets.

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smithinjapan: And YOU are the type of person who can

It's often difficult to find a point to your posts, hence finding a response is even more difficult. I'm sure it makes sense in your mind in some way, but often times others would probably agree that you just tend to ramble on.

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SuperLib, just debate the issue my friend. You seem to neglect the fact that I believe that this guy should have remained in a cell until his death. You also appear to neglect the fact that the rest of the world (the non-American world) find it laughable that the FBI and the US government are crying injustice and unfairness. If the families of the deceased made statements condemning this release then we should all listen. But when the director of the FBI talks about injustice then it goes in one ear and comes out the other.

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If the families of the deceased made statements condemning this release then we should all listen.

They have and we didn't.

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They have and we didn't.

Japan Today printed Mueller's statement and not those by the families of he deceased. I cannot control the media. Unfortunately.

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Libya formally admitted responsibility for the terrorist Lockerbie bombing in 2003.I think they admitted it to the United Nations first and then to the US.

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TheQuestion: "Maybe morally or cosmically but not legaly"

Well, perhaps not LEGALLY in the US, but then, they hire special people, and always have in ANY country, to do the executing, don't they? Why is that?

SuperLib: "It's often difficult to find a point to your posts..."

Choosing to ignore the obvious is just that, a choice. You asked where Britain has shown mercy elsewhere and when given concrete examples... wait for it... you went completely off-topic and starting branding the person who gave them to you as a terrorist supporter (in essence). He was merely in the first place pointing out that your FBI's whining was interesting, and you got upset and started making all sorts of accusations about his character instead of arguing the points he made, some of which, as I said, were direct examples of the proof you requested. Look, bud, if you can't see the truth through the red haze (your anger), that's your problem. Don't go scratching your head and suggesting that because you can't understand my posts it's anything more than you don't want to.

"You're one-dimensional. Just accept it, have a beer, and get some sleep."

You best heed your own advice, my friend. You were a much better poster before you started getting so defensive about the US.

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northlondon: "Funny thing is, the Americans use it as a negative reference to Brits, but it has never been regarded as abusive in any way by British people. Maybe try again eh ?"

Odd that we're in such agreement on this thread, but there you go. I also find it funny that some silly people on this thread who don't even know the origin of the term 'limey' do their best to use it as mud-slinging despite the fact that most (if any) Britains care one wit.

Anyway, I agree with all of what you say regarding this man. It's interesting to watch people like SuperLib get so upset and try to deflect everything and at the same time claim some sort of moral superiority. Some Americans really can't handle it when choices are beyond their idea of 'justice' (mob rule).

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So if some guy kills your family and the justice director of whatever country decided to let the guy free on grounds of "compassion" you'd be perfectly fine with that? Where was the guy's "compassion" when he decided to blow up the airplane with innocent men women and children on board?

This isn't a US vs UK thing though I'm sure some would like it to be that way.

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There's something they all seem to be forgetting: we all die. I know TheQuestion made some remarks about not caring if the man in question sees some enlightenment at the end of his life or not, but that says more about TheQuestion and his crusade than anything else. When we die, regardless of what religion if any you subscribe to, our time on this earth is done. If you believe in god, and this man decides not to confess in his final moments and say some hail Marys, he's in hell for eternity. If you believe in Buddhism or similar religions the man is doomed by karma. If you believe in nothing then the man will simply cease to exist in a few months.

In any case, what comes to mind is what a number of people say after witnessing the death of (and in some cases killing themselves) someone who murdered someone else, that 'it doesn't bring back' the dead. There have been numerous posts talking about how 'the dead' have no justice afforded to them, but failing to acknowledge that regardless of the fact that this man is going to die shortly in his home that that doesn't change the fact the victims are dead. They could rip this man to shreds with their bare hands, let him rot in prison for a month, rip his eyes out, shoot him.... who knows? point is it would not be 'justice' in the least.

Only a moron would shoot somebody who shot someone else and say "It's justice" without expecting a bullet a moment later.

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badge: "So if some guy kills your family and the justice director of whatever country decided to let the guy free on grounds of "compassion" you'd be perfectly fine with that?"

Did this guy kill your family? It's an easy enough question and ties in directly with what you asked -- for if he didn't you cannot post if not directly affected (and I mean as you say, your family) -- is moot.

"Where was the guy's "compassion" when he decided to blow up the airplane with innocent men women and children on board?"

Don't you guys ever get sick of this eye-for-an-eye Old Testament crap? First, it wasn't proven beyond a doubt the man did what he said they did, and if it were up to SOME countries he would get no trial and would simply be locked up based on suspicions. Second, if he DID do it and was justly locked up, you could beat him until the sun goes down and guess what -- the dead aren't going to come back. Does that mean anyone who has killed should be let go? No, not at all. Does it mean that anyone proven to have done what this man is alleged to have done be released if they are terminally ill and soon to die? no... though that is where the compassion comes in, and what this is about. The British government is being compassionate where this man allegedly was not -- why is that so hard for you guys to get. NO, the man was NOT compassionate to his victims (if he committed the crime), but that doesn't change the fact that the British government is being compassionate.

"This isn't a US vs UK thing though I'm sure some would like it to be that way."

Yourself included, it seems. You make a number of judgements in your post without knowing it, and they lead me to believe you are in fact American and are simply misdirecting offense taken at some of the points made by posters or the fact that the FBI have no authority here and are merely whining when they cannot get their way. I could be wrong, though.

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This has nothing to do with release on compassion. It's an PR illusion. British traded convicted terrorist for economic oil benefit with Libya. Have you looked at British economy lately? They act like they are third world country like Samolia pirates trading for a rasom.

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northlondon: SuperLib, just debate the issue my friend.

OK, the issue is that both you and the FBI think this man shouldn't have been released.

You seem to neglect the fact that I believe that this guy should have remained in a cell until his death.

Actually I think a more accurate statement is that you're forgetting you believe this guy should have remained in a cell until his death.

You also appear to neglect the fact that the rest of the world (the non-American world) find it laughable that the FBI and the US government are crying injustice and unfairness.

I think most of the world is making their own decisions based on the case. Some think he was innocent and support the release, some think he was guilty and don't support the release, and some think he was guilty but support the release on the grounds of compassion. Some even believe the UK did it to get their hands on all that Libyan oil, but we're too busy discussing Iraqi oil to get into all of that. We'll just have to table it for a later date.

If the families of the deceased made statements condemning this release then we should all listen.

If?

But when the director of the FBI talks about injustice then it goes in one ear and comes out the other.

Great. I'm glad you feel that way. I feel that same way about European government officials. By the way, how do you feel about the government who just released a man you believe to be a mass murderer? Any outrage left for that?

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smithinjapan: Don't go scratching your head and suggesting that because you can't understand my posts it's anything more than you don't want to.

I just find that your posts tend to be a rambling, stream of consciousness type of writing. It seems that most of your posts could be written in 2 sentences or less, but you somehow find a way to expand them to 4 paragraphs.

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Well, perhaps not LEGALLY in the US, but then, they hire special people, and always have in ANY country, to do the executing, don't they? Why is that?

If you phrased the question in a more straight forward manner I could take a crack at it. As it stands I can't really understand what you're asking.

I know TheQuestion made some remarks about not caring if the man in question sees some enlightenment at the end of his life or not, but that says more about TheQuestion and his crusade than anything else.

Woah woah woah, I'm just a guy giving his opinion on a news website. I'd need to make a few very persuasive phone calls before you could call it a crusade.

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Smith in japan

First, it wasn't proven beyond a doubt the man did what he said they did.

No it wasn't. he was found guilty on very flimsy evidence.

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There wasn't much outrage from the Americans when all the IRA terrorists were set free as part of the "peace process". Talk about double standards.

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Cat5 What a ballbag.

Everyone else... I don't know this case fully enough, but 'if' he was in on flimsy evidence, then his release seems ok to me.

I don't see why the US should throw its weight around. Hardly the beacon of justice, transparency and democracy that it claims itself to be. Scotland's blood for oil? Don't make me laugh.

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This guy didn't do anything and the FBI should know that. He was given over by the Libiyan government as a peace offering. He is in effect a stooge and most people who well read in this case know that that is a distict possibility if not a certainty. The western world began trading with Libiya shortly after his imprisonment and all was forgotten and Libiya kept their end of the bargain by keeping her nose clean and being a responsible global citizen. What we tend to forget is that Iranian terrorists most definitely carried out this bombing and that this was at best overlooked and worse covered up at the expense of a tit-for-tat with Libiya.. Wake up people, even some of the victims believe this to be the case after extensively going through the trial evidence.

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Still, doesn't detract from this person being convicted and then release. His innocence should not come into effect when looking at the sentence. That I agree is wrong.

But like I said, he didn't do it, so I feel less upset about this..

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And since when did the FBI have any jurisdiction over Scottish law? Opps, just read, he only wrote a strong letter to Scotland, well woopy doo, why bother?

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France ain't happy about his release either.

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Yourself included, it seems. You make a number of judgements in your post without knowing it, and they lead me to believe you are in fact American and are simply misdirecting offense taken at some of the points made by posters or the fact that the FBI have no authority here and are merely whining when they cannot get their way. I could be wrong, though.

How so, all I did was ask questions. The FBI has no authority, the guy wrote a letter expressing his opinion, is that now somehow illegal?

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The British have extensive trade interests in Libya, and Megrahi has become an obstacle to them. As Saif Gadhafi, a son of Libya's leader said: "In all commercial contracts for oil and gas with Britian, Megrahi was always on the negotiating table". The British had been seeking to unload Megrahi for some time since Gadhafi's reunciation of terrism and his scrapping of weapons of mass destruction. Gadhafi made clear that lucrative oil deals depended on Megrahi's repatriation. British expats were threatened with similar reprisals if Megrahi died in prison, so home he went. Once Megrahi was released, it was dumb for British and the Americans to expect Gadhafi to refrain from giving him a big public reception.

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