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Fear on front lines as hospital staff face threats, stigma over coronavirus

14 Comments
By Karen Lema and Neil Jerome Morales

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14 Comments
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What about all the truckers, delivery, employee cashiers at grocery stores etc. The handle people face to face everyday too. They also touch all the products that someone could have blasted and an air droplets happens to land on that product. Yet no gloves? hmmm..

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There emerge always prejudiced and half-brain people. A large majority are, though not so vocal, respectful of medical staff; skills, efforts and commitments, regardless of outcomes.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"They remain unfazed by the discrimination that healthcare workers now face."

Crazy times. Scary times. Hats off and thank you to all health workers and security personnel, each person working the frontlines of this battle. The gap between those at the top and those working directly with the ill remains to wide.

What about all the truckers, delivery, employee cashiers at grocery stores etc.

Hats off and thank you to each of them. They, too, have been having problems getting the protective equipment needed, once again pointing out how ill-prepared the country has been to face this monster. Maybe now some among the the masters of the economy will come to realize public health is vital to maintaining economic health.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This is more about poverty and ignorance and the consequences of those things than it is about people being "half-brained". What we're seeing is the instinctive response to a threat of frightened and ill-informed people in countries where governments are eternally corrupt and which the ordinary person, especially the poor, has learned just cannot be trusted.

Just be glad you don't live in a country like that, and be grateful for the standards of healthcare and education which we sometimes takes for granted. And thank you to all of our own dedicated healthcare and other workers who are working in the front line against this epidemic.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Here in a nutshell is the difference between the ethically and morally advanced nations, and the rest. In Europe they applaud their healthcare workers, in Japan and other Asian nations, they shun them.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

In the UK 750,000 volunteers to help out. In London emergency 4,000 bed hospital built by the military and staffed by retired doctors and nurses. Happening in four other UK cities.

People came to their home doors and windows to applaud the NHS workers.

Food stores providing free food packages for the NHS workers.

Some hotel rooms offered for free.

Some of those workers don't have enough protective items.

But there are also the bad who attack those workers.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

third world country, nothing new there.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Hospitals whose staff are threatened and shunned by the community should announce that they will close if such malicious acts continue.

They don’t deserve to face two threats at the same time.

These humans are more deadlier than Covid-19 and the government must act quickly before they start killing medical workers.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Isolation/loneliness/panic/fear/violence/anger/induced poverty/stress/impeded education/profiteering/etc are never mentioned.

Just infection rate and death toll scores.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

What a bunch of dumb-butts, attacking these health care workers like that! Don't they have enough sense to see that these front-liners are trying to keep a bad situation from worsening?

Whoever messes with these health care workers should be locked up. This is inexcusable to say the least, not to mention idiotic to the max.

I can't believe this crap! 

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@BigYen:

I hope you mean that some people who live in poverty act this way. There are many in all walks of society who display anxiety and fear and act out these fears in unacceptable ways.

Just because some live in absolute poverty or breadline povety does not mean they know not right or wrong, or lack understanding to act appropriately.

Stay well, and keep well everyone.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Mr. Blobby:

I hope you mean that some people who live in poverty act this way.

Yes, that's exactly what I meant.

Just because some live in absolute poverty or breadline povety does not mean they know not right or wrong, or lack understanding to act appropriately.

Absolutely. The vast majority worldwide.

Unfortunately, many of the poor in countries such as the Philippines have learnt through bitter experience that their so-called authorities and governments don't give a damn about the poor are not to be trusted. I think that what we're seeing here is one of the less justifiable manifestations of that fear and mistrust.

All the best to you, sport.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@BigYen:

This specific JapanToday news article is about medical staff within a hospital setting and the abuse the staff are having to deal with.

This concern of authorities and governments not giving a damn about their poorer individuals and communities is a valid point, but best placed in another news article that is highlighting inept, corrupt, prejudice and incompetent governments.

Stay well, and keep well everyone.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Mr. Blobby

This specific JapanToday news article is about medical staff within a hospital setting and the abuse the staff are having to deal with.

You seem not to have read the article properly. It starts with the story of a janitor assaulted on his way to work, not at work, goes on to report medical workers being evacuated from their accommodation in India, evictions of workers from their homes in the Philippines and in Japan, and some medical workers being refused transport and laundry services. Also in the article, concerns about social media campaigns against medical workers.

So the article is very clearly about the difficulties faced by medical workers in the wider community as a result of their employment becoming known to neighbours, and when that wider community is one that is poor and ill-informed, and kept so by their alleged betters, then to mention those factors as contributing to the violence is very clearly relevant.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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