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Feds: Hawaii missile alert employee not cooperating in probe

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7 Comments
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Dem state.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

He works for the taxpayers so his name should be public.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If no crime was committed, leave the person alone. Embarrassment was enough punishment.

But, definitely ask what should be modified in the system to prevent future accidents.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So can they not tell us the reason he gave on his statement. Was it a genuine mistake?

Was it a prank taken too far?

Don't need to know who he is, but we have the right to know the reason why it happened.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

He works for the taxpayers so his name should be public.

That may not be such a good idea.

https://nypost.com/2018/01/15/agency-that-sent-false-missile-alert-in-hawaii-gets-death-threats/

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bigger question is why did it take nearly 40 minutes to rescind the alert? NORAD contacted TPTB in Hawaii 6 minutes after the message was issued that no missiles were heading toward the Aloha State.

This was a complete breakdown in communications. . . .

1 ( +1 / -0 )

New article today says the employee believed the missile alert was real.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/01/fcc-says-hawaii-officer-who-sent-false-missile-alert-thought-it-was-not-a-drill/

Seems the overnight manager decided to pull a drill during the night-day shift change. The day shift manager didn't think any of his people would be involved, so he wasn't in place.

Also says that there was an announcement over the loudspeakers saying "this is not a drill" which multiple people remember hearing.

So, the employee seems to have been doing exactly what he/she believed was correct with the information provided.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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