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Flash floods sweep away houses, cars in Australian town

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Scientists believe climate change could make periods of flooding more extreme because warmer air holds more moisture.

That’s quite contradicting and bare of logic. Either we have , under the precondition that there’s a climate change and that it causes warmer air, then more warmer air that holds the more moisture or we have the opposite, more flooding and their hypothesis above negated, meaning that the warmer air holds less moisture but instead leading to flooding.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

That’s quite contradicting and bare of logic. Either we have ... warmer air that holds the more moisture or we have the opposite, more flooding

The tropics, closer to the equator have always been warmer and the rainfall is tremendous - e.g., in Taiwan. However, other areas closer to the equator, e.g., Saudi Arabia, are warmer (during the day) but are very dry.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

That’s quite contradicting and bare of logic

That is because you make an invalid assumption, that air that can hold more humidity will hold it forever. In reality this means that at the time of precipitation this higher amount of humidity translates to higher amount of rain (as well as other factors that also contribute).

https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/climate-change-floods/

2 ( +2 / -0 )

That’s quite contradicting and bare of logic. Either we have , under the precondition that there’s a climate change and that it causes warmer air, then more warmer air that holds the more moisture or we have the opposite, more flooding and their hypothesis above negated, meaning that the warmer air holds less moisture but instead leading to flooding.

Warmer air can hold more moisture, i.e, be more humid than cold are. This is in part why Antarctica is so arid. Hot humid air has more convection going on than cold dry air, and it is that convection that creates big thunderheads and heavy downpours.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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