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Flights canceled during China's worst sandstorm in a decade

19 Comments

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19 Comments
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So long as it is contained within the national border, we wouldn't bother much. Whatever comes from that country will cause big troubles to its neighbors (and around the world as well).

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

So long as it is contained within the national border, we wouldn't bother much. Whatever comes from that country will cause big troubles to its neighbors (and around the world as well).

?????

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

Is it a sandstorm or is it China's daily Smog?

6 ( +10 / -4 )

If this a sandstorm, *one of many possible ‘natural phenomena’** , *why are these additional notes added? :

It wasn't clear if the storm was related to a recent general decline in air quality despite efforts to end Beijing's choking smog.” - *AND -“**The ruling Communist Party has pledged to reduce carbon emissions per unit of economic output by 18% over the next five years. Environmentalists say China needs to do more to reduce dependency on coal that has made it the world's biggest emitter of climate changing gasses.*”

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Here in western Kyushu, our car windows get a yearly dusting of the stuff each spring. Perhaps this year, it will be worse.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Of additional weather related note, when looking at the current ‘front page’ of this afternoon’s JT edition, the dismal, sepia tones of China’s current air conditions stand in stark contrast to the remarkably beautiful, cool blues and warm pinks of the current weather in cool, sunny Tokyo.

The contrast of headlines, photos and presentation, while not necessarily drafted as ‘propaganda’, may also symbolize the great disparity of both, environmental and political ideologies.

Considering the last paragraph of this article - “Environmentalists say China needs to do more to reduce dependency on coal that has made it the world's biggest emitter of climate changing gasses.” - sadly, the Japanese archipelago is also periodically affected by the prevailing winds from China.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

As these dust storms have been occurring since before China's industrialization it would seem pretty clear that they are not related to a recent general decline in air quality.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

You reap what you sow.

China has been decimating their countryside for years, all in the name of progress

3 ( +7 / -4 )

As these dust storms have been occurring since before China's industrialization it would seem pretty clear that they are not related to a recent general decline in air quality.

Across most parts of the West Japan the sky has become hazy for years from winter to spring season. Such a phenomenon is recently observed, corresponding to China's rapid industrialisation. PM 2.5 particle is responsible for it, and the pollution is man-made.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Commiserations to the citizens who have to carry on through the storm. There will be many cars needing a wash and bird baths will need cleaning throughout the city.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Bird baths you say. I like your optimism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The death rate in Japan increases by 1% when the yellow sand blows in every year. It travels all the way to the west coast on North America.

A hundred years ago it was just sand, not it picks up all the crap in the air in China and is laden with toxins and heavy metals.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

As these dust storms have been occurring since before China's industrialization it would seem pretty clear that they are not related to a recent general decline in air quality.

Deforestation and soil erosion in China, Kazakhstan and Mongolia have increased the frequency and severity of the dust storms. Draining aquifers for irrigation and municipal water supplies has made these problems worse. In addition high levels of mercury and other industrial pollutants in the blowing dust has made the dust much more hazardous to everyone's health.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Some of this dust makes its way across the Pacific to North America and contributes to poor air quality there.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Its OK they can harvest it and make a island out of it and claim that too!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Would be interesting to see what Beijin would do if Taiwan had a military "exercise" making ships and aircraft dash towards the mainland. After all, isn't Taiwan the true China and the mainland just being run by rebels?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yep this stuff makes its way to Kyushu every year.

Here in north Chiba we also get lots of sand storms, more local, & get sand drifts covering large patches of roads & then well after the wind has gone the sand continues to get sent into the air with each passing vehicle. Yachimata where they grow lots of peanuts is well know for this nastiness, you DONT hang laundry outside for while often in the spring

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sounds really nasty when you include all the pollution mixed in with the sand. Very bad for health.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Are there any birds alive in China , let alone Beijing?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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