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French livid over Pamela Anderson's foie gras crusade

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This food involves deliberate cruelty, not just accidental, over a prolonged period. "I like the taste" and tradition cannot really justify it. Good on ya, Pamela.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Maybe this is Canada's payback for France sending Brigitte Bardot after them.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

70 percent of French people are opposed to force-feeding “given that there are alternatives” to produce foie gras.

'Don't produce foie gras by torturing birds' would seem to be a reasonable alternative. At least the message seems to be getting through, albeit very slowly.

Japan in December banned imports of French foie gras due to the outbreak of H5N1

Unfortunately in Japan the message isn't getting through; it still tends to be seen as an upmarket, quality, luxury item. People don't seem to care how it's made.

From wiki - The mortality rate in force-fed birds varies from 2% to 4%, compared with approximately 0.2% in age-matched, non-force-fed drakes. Mortality rates do not differ between the force-feeding period and the previous rearing phase, with both being approximately 2.5%. Given that during 2007 in France alone 43,600,000 ducks were reared for foie gras, 1,090,000 ducks died in this country in the production of foie gras before reaching slaughter weight.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

The irony: Pam Anderson going after people for artificially inflating body parts...

10 ( +12 / -2 )

The rest of the poultry industry is no picnic either.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Anderson “is strongly committed to us continuing to eat well, without inflicting harm on animals.”

"The thick liver pate is made by using a tube to force-feed corn into ducks and geese, fattening them to around four times their natural body weight."

It takes a Canadian-American to tell the French their food causes harm? Obviously Ms. Anderson does not suffer from gout.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Anderson “is strongly committed to us continuing to eat well, without inflicting harm on animals.” So her dinner fare is consumed while alive?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Anderson “is strongly committed to us continuing to eat well, without inflicting harm on animals.” So her dinner fare is consumed while alive?

She's a vegan and doesn't consume animal products. Use your head.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I would agree, this is one tradition that needs to go!

Being force fed constantly much be incredibly painful torture to endure.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Good if it gets under their skin -- it should. Frois gras is something that should be banned outright, along with other barbaric practices like seal clubbing, whaling, raising baby cattle for veal, and so on and so on. It would be nice if the countries that import it stopped doing so -- and not just because of the threat of Bird Flu (though if that's what it takes, hope the threat continues).

0 ( +3 / -3 )

From wiki - The mortality rate in force-fed birds varies from 2% to 4%, compared with approximately 0.2% in age-matched, non-force-fed drakes.

Eh... I am going to have to differ. The mortality rate for geese and ducks raised for foie gras is 100%.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

FadamorJan. 20, 2016 - 11:39PM JST "From wiki - The mortality rate in force-fed birds varies from 2% to 4%, compared with approximately 0.2% in age-matched, non-force-fed drakes." Eh... I am going to have to differ. The mortality rate for geese and ducks raised for foie gras is 100%.

They are talking about the mortality rate resulting from the force feeding procedure, not the ultimate result. In which case the mortality rate of ducks and geese whether force fed or not is obviously 100%.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Good grief, among all the important issues in the world, this celebrity picks overweight geese to get excited about? Shaking head...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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