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Hackers demand $10 mil for stolen Australian health records

17 Comments
By Steven TRASK

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17 Comments
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Paying $10m is better. They can be caught later. Crime never pays.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

And here in Japan, and on JT as well, there are all sorts of people advocating for their medical records, and everything else it seems, to be placed online.

No country is immune from these hackers, and I for one do not trust Japanese authorities to keep my information secure!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Prognosis: "Arid with occasional flooding."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So assuming your addiction history has now been made Public, what are your options ? Clearly you will loose your Job, and probably be very unlikely to find another - so can you sue Medibank for lost earnings and defamation ? I guess if you can, then they'll go our of Business due to the number of people suing them.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Russians again.

My brother deals with cyber attacks daily in his job.

Its non stop

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Mi number prediction!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"My Number" if it replaces the current health care will not have any actual medical data on it only health insurance details. There will be no centralized medical records.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If you pay these bums they will do the same thing again and again! I wouldn't give into their demands!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One of the biggest mistakes made by Governments was to ban the publications of who owned internet domain names (i.e. URLs)

It's now no longer possible to track down who owns, for example 1stphorm.com (a recent Phishing email I received). This means, attacks upon businesses such as the one reported here will be more common place, and harder to protect against

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One of the biggest mistakes made by Governments was to ban the publications of who owned internet domain names (i.e. URLs)

Huh? Publishing the owner of domains isn't banned. You can do a whois to find out who owns sites, although some people choose domain privacy, which doesn't expose their information publicly. But they are still required by law to register a name and address to a domain when it is rented (you can't buy domains).

It's now no longer possible to track down who owns, for example 1stphorm.com (a recent Phishing email I received).

This information does exist, and can be subpoenaed.

This means, attacks upon businesses such as the one reported here will be more common place, and harder to protect against

No, it doesn't mean that. Actually, your understanding of the situation is incorrect, as an attack wouldn't be from a domain. Domains are just addresses on the internet. I'm not sure why you think knowing who owns a given domain would help understand who did this attack - these two things are not connected.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Paying $10m is better. They can be caught later. Crime never pays.

It pays if they pay them $10 million!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@strangerland ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_privacy

I used to track down Spammers, etc. through the domain names they had personally registered. Their personal names & addresses being available for all to see....

Now a days, you can't see that level of information in order to know who personally registered the domain name:

Examples being:

https://www.whois.com/whois/binanace.com

https://www.whois.com/whois/himalaya.exchange

https://www.whois.com/whois/japantoday.com

https://www.whois.com/whois/thepiratebay.com

etc...

For the Dark Web (TOR based .onion sites), that information isn't clearly obtainable., you have to resort to other means in order to obtain it...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For the Dark Web (TOR based .onion sites), that information isn't clearly obtainable., you have to resort to other means in order to obtain it...

You said it was banned to provide this information:

One of the biggest mistakes made by Governments was to ban the publications of who owned internet domain names (i.e. URLs)

I was pointing out that you were entirely incorrect, and the government has never banned this. Nothing you posted changed that.

Also, domain privacy literally would have nothing to do with this attack. Even if all domains were legally required to show the domain owner with a whois query, that still would not assist in tracking down whomever did this attack.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

$10 million seems a bit cheap to me. Almost like Dr. Evil holding the world hostage for $1 MILLION dollars....

But no. Don't pay them. Maybe the Russians are just hard up for cash having sent all of theirs to Iran and DORK for scrappy weapons.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Picking on public Health Systems of any kind is the pits. Lowest of the low. The Aussies should not give them a cent. Dont give in to them or they'll just do it again in another country.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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