Daniel Wong (right) was among those arrested in the sweep Photo: AFP
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Hong Kong national security police make 11 new arrests

7 Comments
By Anthony WALLACE

Hong Kong's national security police arrested 11 people in dawn raids on Thursday, including a veteran human rights lawyer, on suspicion of helping a group of activists make a failed bid to flee the city by speedboat.

"Eleven people were arrested by the national security department for 'conspiracy to assist offenders'," a senior police source told AFP.

The officer confirmed those arrested were suspected of aiding 12 Hong Kong pro-democracy activists caught last August by Chinese coastguards as they tried to flee by boat to Taiwan.

Those on board were facing charges in Hong Kong for crimes linked to huge and often violent democracy protests that convulsed the finance hub in 2019.

The arrests come a week after national security police detained more than 50 of the city's most prominent democracy activists for subversion, one of the new crimes listed in a sweeping national security law that Beijing imposed on the city last year.

Among those detained on Thursday was Daniel Wong, a veteran human rights lawyer and an outspoken supporter of Hong Kong's democracy movement.

"National security police arrived at my home around 6.10 am and I do not know at the moment which police station they will take me to," Wong wrote on his Facebook page.

The 71-year-old is also the founder of a restaurant in Taipei which hires and helps Hong Kongers who have fled to the democratic island.

Willis Ho, a former student leader, confirmed her mother was among those arrested.

Last month a Chinese court jailed 10 of the 12 fugitives for up to three years for "organizing and participating in an illegal border crossing".

Two teenagers were returned to Hong Kong to face charges including attempted arson and possession of offensive weapons.

It is not the first time people have been arrested on suspicion of trying to help the group escape Hong Kong.

In October, nine people were detained by the city's new national security unit and later granted bail

The national security law mandates up to life imprisonment for any offense Beijing views as "secession, subversion, collusion with foreign forces and terrorism".

At least 90 people have been arrested since the law's enactment, including US-born human rights lawyer John Clancey, prominent activist Joshua Wong and pro-democracy media mogul Jimmy Lai.

© 2021 AFP

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

7 Comments
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RESIST! Like a quiet flower in the desert. Get up, stand up for your rights.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

11 might as well arrest everyone I have a thought not congenital to the party, harvest my organs, good luck with, that bigger concentration camps I would suggest are needed.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

HK being moved closer and closer to just being another city in China.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Due to my pro freedom for those under siege, I cannot ever set foot in China, or Hong Kong again. Been to HK over 38 times and it is a shame I cannot go and visit my friends there ever again.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

China’s one country two systems is slowly becoming one country one system

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The National Police need to arrest Carrie Lam. She caused the rest with her Beijing handlers.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

theFuJan. 14  09:56 pm JST

The National Police need to arrest Carrie Lam. She caused the rest with her Beijing handlers.

She caused the unrest because she is a stooge for the CCP.

tooheysnewJan. 14  06:25 pm JST

China’s one country two systems is slowly becoming one country one system

And it's even worse because Communist education and crap doctrine in China says that CCP rules all of it - mainland, HK and Taiwan.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

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