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Hong Kong police arrest 5 trade union members for sedition

32 Comments
By ZEN SOO

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32 Comments
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Looks like the guy with the black hood over head is going to be executed.

There's no freedom at all in Hong Kong as promised by China before the '97 handover.

Don't give them the pleasure of attending their egotistical, money making Olympics.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

China getting bolder and bolder. Poor HK.

14 ( +15 / -1 )

The sheep take action like going on strike or escaping by boat, according to the synopses published on the association’s website.

It doesn’t sound like the sheep are violent.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Might as well as let Twitter, YouTube, Google and Facebook in too

4 ( +4 / -0 )

While the World focuses on Tokyo’s ‘Games’, ‘The Neighbors’ are playing their own in 40℃ heat & humidity.

“A [fully covered in Black and] hooded suspect is accompanied by a police officer to search evidence at office in Hong Kong Thu, Jul 22, ‘21. National security police arrested 5 people from a trade union of the General Association of Hong Kong Speech Therapists on suspicion of conspiring to publish and distribute seditious material, in the latest arrests made amid a crackdown on dissent in the city. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)] -

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Perhaps visiting a most exigent ‘port of call’ in support of ‘liberty & freedom’ in the region would be more prudent?

“British carrier strike group to make port calls in Japan in September” - July 21

3 ( +3 / -0 )

And the sick and dangerous puppet regime known as Hong Kong keeps being turned into a terror State.

Boycott Hong Kong until their Commie puppet regime is torn down.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

The association published three children’s books that authorities apparently suspect are metaphors for the political crisis. The books feature stories that revolve around a village of sheep that has to deal with wolves from a different village. The sheep take action like going on strike or escaping by boat, according to the synopses published on the association’s website.

Ah yes, guilty of wrongspeak. Looks like the CCP authorities take their clues from Twitter, Youtube, Facebook, Google et al in their determination to control freedom of thought and speech.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Do not go to Hong Kong. Do not transit in Hong Kong. Sad, but the only choice is to alleviate their citizens in their flite to safety. America and Canada will benefit greatly from their highly-educated populace; the PRC will be left with an empty shell.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

And one more reason to BOYCOTT China Olympics!!!! FREE Hong Kong!!!! Down with China!!!!

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Be careful what you wish for.

The Hong Kong people wanted the British out & here we are

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

The Hong Kong people wanted the British out & here we are

Did you miss history class ?

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Be careful what you wish for.

The Hong Kong people wanted the British out & here we are

Really?

You make it sound like they had a choice in it.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Whether it's Jan. 6 or this Hong Kong "sedition" arrests, governments are cracking down on public dissent.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Boycott HK and anything to do with the CCP and the mainland. The real Chinese government sits on the beautiful island of Formosa known as Taiwan.

If you really want to support, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and other areas suppressed by the CCP hoodlums, buy Taiwan Milk Pineapples. Best fruit ever.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

That’s a chilling photograph. Reminds me of Abu Ghraib.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

FYI, I lived in HK for many years, & most of the locals I often talked to, wanted the British out.

So stick that in your history class.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Yeah right China - this overly-broad national security law would not pass in any other country with a vigilant democratic populace

2 ( +2 / -0 )

FYI, I lived in HK for many years, & most of the locals I often talked to, wanted the British out

Ah, the famous "trust me, i can't prove it but i know better than you" of internet when i try to find an excuse to my epic fail.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

If you are in HK and have the resources to get out, do so NOW. The mainland has absolutely no intention of keeping their agreement. It's Hong Kong today and as soon as they think they can pull it off, Taiwan next.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Xi is quite sincere in his efforts to make himself absolute dictator of China.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Need to take down the ccp.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I bet they are regretting the British handing them back. Let this be a lesson to all the colonial guilt obsessed moaners, be careful what you wish for.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@tokyojoe

Yeh, thats basically what I was expressing

unfortunately certain people here don’t believe anything unless it has a link.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

In Chinese it's called "communism", but it's plain and simple fascism by any other name and in any other language. Absolute power still corrupts absolutely - an iron principle that rules in human affairs without exception.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The hood seems like a good option for anyone who is arrested. Publicizing the names and faces of people before they are convicted sometimes results in additional victims of that person coming out, but it's much more common that someone is arrested and later cleared or judged innocent in court, but punished by everyone who thinks they are now a criminal.

Of course, it should only be an option as I suspect that most who are arrested for political reasons won't want to be anonymous.....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not usually a fan of imperialism, but the brits returning Hong Kong was probably a mistake

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Authoritarian govts are afraid of ideas. Wonder what Pooh Bear thinks of that?

The association published three children’s books

To the CCP members, what is the legal way for people in Hong Kong to get their govt back to the way it was before the authoritarian laws were forced? After all, China claims that some representation is possible.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In Chinese it's called "communism", but it's plain and simple fascism by any other name and in any other language. Absolute power still corrupts absolutely - an iron principle that rules in human affairs without exception

Just like the puppet resident and the handlers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In Chinese it's called "communism"

Actually in English, the word is "communism", but China is not Communist.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Think Neapolitan wrote, One should never fear a competent enemy but an incompetent ally. The UK really let down the people of Hong Kong.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Not usually a fan of imperialism, but the brits returning Hong Kong was probably a mistake.

It was a necessity. There's no getting around it.

The New Territories lease was until 1997, which led to most of the subsequent difficulties. Between the signing of that treaty in 1898 and the early 1980s negotiations over the expiry of the lease, colonialism was extinguished. There were very few colonies left, Hong Kong being by far the most significant of them, and the word empire as the British had used it even in the postwar years was already extinct. Imperialism didn't survive the 1960s and it was on the way out long before that.

Based on what Britain signed in 1898, Hong Kong had no legal right to continue in its then-current form after 1997. It could only do what China would agree to. That is cold, hard fact. China legally had the right to refuse to extend the lease or provide any other non-PRC sovereignty to the New Territories, and this is what they did.

The New Territories are 86% of Hong Kong's territory. Disagreement between China and Britain over post-1997 Hong Kong would have required a new border, both land and maritime: in this case, a logistical and economic nightmare.

The new airport in Hong Kong is in the New Territories. So are all of the main power stations. So is a lot of the road and rail infrastructure, including the northern end of the Eastern Harbour Tunnel. Also port facilities, container terminals, water treatment, reservoirs, educational institutions, and almost all the hiking trails, beaches, and rural leisure facilities.

Meanwhile, 50% (about 2.5 million in 1985) of the population was resident in the New Territories, and would either have to move across to the British side or find themselves within PRC territory, often with families split on each side of a high security-border - as has happened before in many other places around the world, not with good results.

Attempting to establish a new Hong Kong using just 13% of the originally available territory, but with a vastly increased population in that rump area, would have been crazy even under optimum conditions, but a practical impossibility in the face of hostility from China. The land border would have cut east/west across a heavily urbanised portion of the Kowloon peninsula - the complete opposite of how the old Shenzhen border was conceived, in other words - and most of the maritime border would have narrowly encompassed Hong Kong island and a small part of Kowloon, creating cross border issues within a kilometre or two for vessels in almost every direction of travel.

If you think the Spanish can be irksome and arbitrary with some of their behaviour over Gibraltar, such as impeding cross-border travel by Gibraltarians, China would have had a lot more cards to play, and be willing to push things a lot further with Hong Kong. Britain could never have held on successfully after 1997.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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