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Protests disrupt Hong Kong travel and businesses

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Back in 1997 the comment was why did Britain give HK such a bad deal democracy-wise in handover negotiations. The reply was Beijing could just turn off the water supply, not even counting possibility of sending in troops. So Britain got what they could for HongKongers, supposedly. Of course, not Britain's ox being gored.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I think Hong Kong is at the brink of democratic extinction. I am cancelling my trip to Hong Kong and I urge others to show their dissatisfaction with the Communist China by boycotting Macau and Hong Kong. I also suspect that Taiwan is having sleepless nights as they know that they are next.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Just keep making money for the government and Beijing will be happy.

Mito, Taiwan is a different ballgame. The U.S. has got their back. They'll be there to take care of business if China steps over the line. Look how well things are going down in the Middle East, so no problemo.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@mitokomonalex ...I think Hong Kong is at the brink of democratic extinction.

Democracy never evolved in Hong Kong, neither under the British nor under the Party, so how can it become extinct? It is like the protesters are saying, this is a farce not democracy.

Many Kudos to them - sincerely hoping for their well being and safety.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I personally know a little bit about the financial deals that went on in the turnover. Basically, the Brits emptied Hong Kong's entire reserve. Where did that money go? Some say that went to that new airport they built (by British companies), some say they were siphoned off little by little ever since the 90s.

Many of that reserve went to the British officials served in Hong Kong. By giving them permanent payout after a lump sum pension no matter the years they served.

On the turnover, the Brits basically looted HK citizens coffers. And left them with less than HKD$10 Billion or about $1.3 Billion USD in their reserve.

So, what I want to say is, the Brits didn't have HK or HK citizen's benefit in mind for sure. If China didn't pump in hundreds of billions in order to maintain HK's stability, there would be no financial center in HK as we speak.

And here's the fact: HK had never had a democratic election on electing its paramount leader. That governor of HK had always been appointed by UK Gov't. Not only that, the supreme court judges, police chiefs, public administrative officials were mostly British nationals. A vast majority of what rules HK are not Hong Kong citizens.

I don't know where this democracy thing is coming from because that has never happened in HK's entire history since its creation.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

highball7 I don't know where this democracy thing is coming from because that has never happened in HK's entire history since its creation.

But can you imagine that people would like to evolve toward this "democracy thing", even though it never happened in HK ?!

5 ( +6 / -1 )

the problem is as much aboutthe Beijing government assuming Hong Kong people are stupid..give us some kind of sham election and call it democracy?if they were just honest and said'hey we are going to give you a puppet leader if you don't like it you can just leave"honestly that would be easier to deal with than them trying to tell lies and assume we are a bunch of idiots,

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@highball7

On the turnover, the Brits basically looted HK citizens coffers. And left them with less than HKD$10 Billion or about $1.3 Billion USD in their reserve.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority declared foreign exchange reserves of US$81.7 (HK$612 billion) for the end of July 1997.

http://www.hkma.gov.hk/eng/key-information/press-releases/1997/970829.shtml

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@highball7

"The Brits basically looted HK citizens coffers...."

That's a pretty outrageous claim. Even if it were true (yeah, right), it wouldn't be such a big deal, since HK's individual income tax rates were among the lowest in the world. So think of all the revenue the Brits could have pocketed if they had raised people's taxes to global norms.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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