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Huge trash-collecting boom in Pacific Ocean breaks apart

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I haven't seen any photos of this "garbage island". It probably doesn't exist and this is all a scam to outlaw plastics. Most people throw away their trash in the right place. The permanent "homeless" class cause more damage than entire communities. Maybe vagrants should be locked away and people who litter should have their water shut off for a few days.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

A great idea and I hope the boom can be repaired asap. The sheer volume of plastic waste in the sea is astounding and will eventually destroy marine ecology as we know it.

The permanent "homeless" class cause more damage than entire communities.

Actually, there are communities all over the world who are classified as homeless who recycle and repurpose plastics and other waste. Most notably in India, countries in Africa and cities like San Francisco.

Maybe vagrants should be locked away and people who litter should have their water shut off for a few days.

Maybe not, eh.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

By the way. I really hope that the ship is electric or uses wind or solar power. It would be an environmental nightmare if it uses fossil fuels.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@insane. you must really hate nature and people trying to do good things for the world. i bet you don't believe Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns existed, that global warming is a hoax and that the world is flat because if everyone would fall over it is round. there are thousands and thousands of photos, videos and documentaries. it can be seen from space.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Insane" Wayne

The only way you've never seen pictures of the pacific garbage patch is if you never tried to look or you simply don't believe the pictures are real. Other than viewing it from space, it's Imposible to photograph the whole thing. However, I have personally witnessed a five mile long sections of it, so thick that it became a navigational hazard and we had no choice but to go around it. Its true I didn't see a plastic patch the size of Texas but even once we cleared the floating garbadge, our boat was being hindered by underwater debre for another three miles. So we can debate the size but to not recognize it as a problem is just silly.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

You guys must read a lot of Breibart if you believe this. trade in your Trump hats for some candy and go home. Your mommies are calling you. From space bwahahahahahahaha !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The information is out there, Insane Wayne.

https://www.technologynetworks.com/applied-sciences/news/great-pacific-garbage-patch-dwarfs-previous-size-estimates-298928

https://www.theoceancleanup.com/great-pacific-garbage-patch/

If you need photographic evidence, just Google great pacific garbage patch aerial view.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You need to be fact checked. Canadian pot shops generate more plastic waste than the entire continent of Africa. Do some reading. eh

I'd like to see your fact-check on this one. Link, please and thank you.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It isn't a garbage patch according to NOAA. https://response.restoration.noaa.gov/about/media/how-big-great-pacific-garbage-patch-science-vs-myth.html It is a problem, but it doesn't look like what we've all been lead to think it looks like.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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