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In Mexico, a wave of political murders eats away at democracy

30 Comments
By Lizbeth Diaz

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Mexico is a failing state and will soon be like Haiti. Either you treat the cartels like the Islamic State and erase them with military power or accept the inevitable - they run they place - and escape if you can.

I hope America has a plan to deal with this. Because once the cartels are in full control, they will expand North, from the motherland to the promised land.

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I hope America has a plan to deal with this. Because once the cartels are in full control, they will expand North, from the motherland to the promised land.

As long as the Democrats are in power it will never, ever happen and the U.S. will closely rival Mexico in crime and murders in the future at this alarming pace.

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The Mexican elections are taking place amidst intense violence and frequent daily killings.

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Where do all the cartel guns come from?

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wallaceToday 09:51 am JST

Where do all the cartel guns come from?

Where do all the drugs come from? Mexico can seal its borders far more easily than the US can seal its border.

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Where do all the drugs come from? Mexico can seal its borders far more easily than the US can seal its border.

It's the same shared border.

Drugs go north and kill many tens of thousands. Guns in turn go south and kill many tens of thousands.

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Drugs go north and kill many tens of thousands. Guns in turn go south and kill many tens of thousands.

If this Administration would reinstate the Trump policies and seal the borders, we would see less of this

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If this Administration would reinstate the Trump policies and seal the borders, we would see less of this

Regardless of which administration is in power, the US has not been able to prevent Mexican cartel drugs from flowing into the country for many decades. The US does pay attention to the issue of guns flowing south, but it is impossible to completely seal the border. Additionally, there are frequently used sea routes that further complicate border control efforts.

The US has lost its drug war.

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wallaceToday 10:00 am JST

Where do all the drugs come from? Mexico can seal its borders far more easily than the US can seal its border.

It's the same shared border.

Drugs go north and kill many tens of thousands. Guns in turn go south and kill many tens of thousands.

Mexico isn't creating the drugs passing through there in large part. To the extent they are cooking fentanyl with Chinese chemicals, this is also their border problem.

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bass4funkToday 10:26 am JST

Drugs go north and kill many tens of thousands. Guns in turn go south and kill many tens of thousands.

If this Administration would reinstate the Trump policies and seal the borders, we would see less of this

Considering the drugs come through legal points of entry for the most part, no, you would see the same amount of drugs.

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wallaceToday 11:38 am JST

The US has lost its drug war.

So what is your solution? We aren't going to ban guns anytime soon. Complete decriminalization has exploded homelessness and petty crime where it has been tried. And we aren't going to be introducing a UBI for Mexico in their current state.

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Mexico isn't creating the drugs passing through there in large part. To the extent they are cooking fentanyl with Chinese chemicals, this is also their border problem.

Nearly all the drugs from South America, including cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, methamphetamine, and fentanyl pass through Mexico and across the border.

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And we aren't going to be introducing a UBI for Mexico in their current state.

What is UBI?

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wallaceToday 11:53 am JST

Mexico isn't creating the drugs passing through there in large part. To the extent they are cooking fentanyl with Chinese chemicals, this is also their border problem.

Nearly all the drugs from South America, including cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, methamphetamine, and fentanyl pass through Mexico and across the border.

Yes, so all of that can be stopped at the Mexican border. The US would be happy to assist I'm sure.

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wallaceToday 11:55 am JST

And we aren't going to be introducing a UBI for Mexico in their current state.

What is UBI?

Universal Basic Income. I was saying that we aren't going to have a Marshall Plan for Mexico, at least while an anti-American is in charge there.

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TaiwanIsNotChinaToday 12:01 pm JST

Yes, so all of that can be stopped at the Mexican border. The US would be happy to assist I'm sure.

*Mexican southern border

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Yes, so all of that can be stopped at the Mexican border. The US would be happy to assist I'm sure.

Over many decades, Mexico and the US have been unsuccessful in preventing the flow of drugs and guns across the border, with drug and gun smuggling proving to be easier than human trafficking.

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UBI would not change the Mexican cartels and would probably demand payments from citizens.

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A major problem in Mexico is the corruption of officials and the police.

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Funny how people expect America to solve Mexico's problems. That would be foreign interference. I will agree that America is a huge problem for Mexico with illegal drug and immigrant transport north and money and firearms transported south.

Until America gets a better solution to both illegal immigrants and drugs in the US, the cartels will be making huge amounts of money to buy weapons and shot Mexican politicians who they can't buy.

I feel bad for the politicians. If they don't take a bribe, they will be killed. If the do take a bribe, they are under the local cartel's control ... and will get more and more funding to get to higher and higher office - even to the President of Mexico. Don't do what the cartel wants - they will kill your brother, his kids and wife to make a point. The message is very clear. The cartels also have people that infiltrated all levels of the police and military, so it is nearly impossible to do a full round up of all members of a cartel. They will always be warned.

Short of importing police/military from a friendly nation and handing over all police power to them in a province as they go door to door to remove all weapons and arrest the drug cartel members, I don't see a solution. BTW, the cartels own some judges too. After all, they have families too. I don't know if door-to-door enforcement would be effective. Mexico is a huge country. Lots of places to hide for months until the govt declares "success", then the cartels would just return and start influencing police, mayors, governors, military all again.

Perhaps the only solution will be to add some yet-to-be invented chemical to the drinking water of the US that makes illegal drugs ineffective, cause illness, or even make skill change color so peer pressure could be applied to drug users.

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Perhaps the only solution will be to add some yet-to-be invented chemical to the drinking water of the US that makes illegal drugs ineffective, cause illness, or even make skill change color so peer pressure could be applied to drug users.

We could also decriminalize all drugs which would take most of the profits away from the cartels. A cartel without profits is just a gang of common criminals. We should be trying to starve them of revenue, not help them to grab it.

Or, we could try another 50 years of a failed policy and see if maybe we can get lucky next time?

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theFuToday 04:07 am JST

Perhaps the only solution will be to add some yet-to-be invented chemical to the drinking water of the US that makes illegal drugs ineffective, cause illness, or even make skill change color so peer pressure could be applied to drug users.

Drug users are already identifiable by the zombie stagger and tents they live out of.

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UChosePoorlyToday 04:39 am JST

We could also decriminalize all drugs which would take most of the profits away from the cartels. A cartel without profits is just a gang of common criminals. We should be trying to starve them of revenue, not help them to grab it.

Or, we could try another 50 years of a failed policy and see if maybe we can get lucky next time?

And what is the solution to the petty crime and homelessness that flourishes where drugs are decriminalized? Maybe if there were cameras on every street corner to catch the dealers but people don't seem to want to go for that.

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I'm starting to think that decriminalization might work but with the police free to put you into a confinement detox program for months. A few cycles through for some people and it might stick.

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And what is the solution to the petty crime and homelessness that flourishes where drugs are decriminalized? Maybe if there were cameras on every street corner to catch the dealers but people don't seem to want to go for that.

For the harder stuff, you would need to have some amount of control, similar to how hard liquor is treated by some states. Is there still bootleg liquor, panhandlers, petty crime, domestic violence, drunk driving, etc. with legalized alcohol? Yes, of course, but what we don't have is $300B a year going to the likes of Capone or the cartels. It now goes to publicly-traded companies, salaries for taxpaying employees, and taxes.

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I'm starting to think that decriminalization might work but with the police free to put you into a confinement detox program for months. 

I don't believe that people should be able to disturb the peace while intoxicated (or sober). I would be ok with increased penalties for drunk & disorderly and disturbing the peace while intoxicated.

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And what is the solution to the petty crime and homelessness that flourishes where drugs are decriminalized?

A lot of the petty crime is because of the illegal nature of the drug trade. If drug dealers are criminals (as opposed to like a liquor store), you are necessarily forcing non-criminal buyers to interact with criminal sellers The illegal nature of the drug trade is what causes most of the violence. Normally non-violent dealers fall prey to violent ones because they don't enjoy police protection like liquor stores do, creating an arms race of sorts between dealers. We simply don't have an analogue for this in the alcohol trade these days (though we did in the 1930's!)

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UChosePoorlyToday 06:30 am JST

I'm starting to think that decriminalization might work but with the police free to put you into a confinement detox program for months. 

I don't believe that people should be able to disturb the peace while intoxicated (or sober). I would be ok with increased penalties for drunk & disorderly and disturbing the peace while intoxicated.

I don't think alcohol is that much fun to imbibe and doesn't cause weeks worth of withdrawals like heroin or fentanyl. In any event, if people can successfully keep the usage of it out of the sight of authorities, then we would see if total decriminalization would work.

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Considering the drugs come through legal points of entry for the most part, no, you would see the same amount of drugs.

https://youtu.be/78mhFQsKT_A?si=6W7XPpHP_LHRimjH

A major problem in Mexico is the corruption of officials and the police.

Well, we know that, but it’s so rooted in the culture, you will not get that out and now more and more of the gangs are crossing over and settling in the U.S. particularly California and Arizona.

With the laxed laws we have by most blue states the problems will not be resolved and it will only worsen, another reason why people are fleeing California.

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A suspected top assassin in Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel was extradited Saturday to the United States, where he will face charges linked to drug and weapons smuggling, the Justice Department announced.

"Nestor Isidro Perez Salas, known as "El Nini," was one of the Sinaloa Cartel's "lead sicarios, or assassins, and was responsible for the murder, torture and kidnapping of rivals and witnesses who threatened the cartel's criminal drug trafficking enterprise," Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a statement after the extradition Saturday morning."

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