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Indonesia executes 8 drug convicts; Filipina spared

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Very harsh and sad from my point of view. And then again, when in Rome......if you break the law you had better know what consequences you risk.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

good riddance to bad rubbish

-15 ( +9 / -24 )

It took 10 years for the Australian government and media to get worked up about this... Yes they broke the law and yes they should have been punished but it would have been more helpful if proper representations had been made to the Indoneasian government during the last 10 years rather than the political grandstanding and threats of the last 6 months.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

"I am sure our many American posters here will find this a good thing."

I don't think it's a good thing.

However, the Filipina, Mary Jane Veloso, was spared after someone suspected of recruiting her and tricking her into carrying drugs to Indonesia turned herself in to authorities in the Philippines.

Could this have been the case with others who were executed? Too late for them now.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Just to think that if they had paid the judges what was asked for then they could have been free in only a few short years. Ah the death penalty, best bargaining chip around.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Everyone who deals, buys, sells and uses hard drugs in that part of the world knows that many southeast Asian countries have extreme penalties for possession and sale or even intent to sell. Those people took a huge risk and lost. There are plenty of other ways to make a living that does not carry those consequences. I don't know which system is worse, in Japan they come and get you with little notice and it's straight off to the necktie party and in Indonesia you know it's coming and have to wake up each day to be tortured by the thought that you day is coming soon.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Had they been rapists or child molesters would the Australian people have been so sympathetic to them?, Their crime was equally devastating to families and mankind. This is not to say they should or should not have been executed, I think public opinion here on what constitutes a big or a small crime is a curios situation. Opinions would be interesting.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Lives lost. Nothing gained.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Got what they deserved. Of course the liberals will thumb me down, as I am sure they think they were good family men. Not selling drugs and destroying countless lives, no, no.

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

Shows how barbaric the government of Indonesia can be to foreign nationals. Message is to avoid Indonesia at all costs since drugs can be planted in your luggage. I think the civilized nations out to make their displeasure known.

5 ( +13 / -8 )

@nostromo. This story has been in the headlines ever since they were arrested and the Australian government has been helping them. Whether they could have done more I not sure and perhaps that is what you're referring to. What I would like to know is what happened to the suppliers? I would assume that they are Indonesian. Were they arrested? What is the Indonesian government doing about that problem? Perhaps they are doing a great deal but I haven't read anything about it in the Australian press. I am anti-drugs but I don't think anyone should be executed for it. To Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran RIP. If there was ever an argument for the value of jail then they could be used as an example. They helped many fellow prisoners from what I've read in regards to education. Isn't reform one of the purposes of a modern jail?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

This is a sad, sorry saga. Those two (Chan and Sukumaran) admitted to being ringleaders, and had made previous attempts (or coerced others to) smuggle drugs in and out of Australia and Indonesia. They were young and foolish, but they definitely knew what they were getting into, and Indonesia's hardline stance is so well-known that they can't have been oblivious to it.

I am sorry for their families.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

"Got what they deserved. Of course the liberals will thumb me down, as I am sure they think they were good family men. Not selling drugs and destroying countless lives, no, no." The tea party are turning against the war on drugs.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Lives lost which is sad indeed, but I am sure there were lives taken if drugs were involved. That area of the world is very strict and anyone 'dealing' should think first.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

YuriOtani: "Shows how barbaric the government of Indonesia can be to foreign nationals. Message is to avoid Indonesia at all costs since drugs can be planted in your luggage. I think the civilized nations out to make their displeasure known."

Both Japan, your homeland, and the US, where you reside, have the death penalty and are not much less barbaric in that regard. Japan in particular is barbaric as it doesn't alert the inmates or family about the executions until the day of, and then suddenly takes them out and executes them. And didn't they just uphold the death sentence for a Chinese man convicted of murder? You might argue the methods are more 'humane', but putting someone to death it putting someone to death, and not giving them any notice except a few hours is heinous at best.

In any case, as I always have, I stand against the death penalty. The Philipina was fortunately given a reprieve, and who's to say the others weren't duped into being mules?

“there are few greater displays of abuse of State power and regressive thinking than the death penalty”

Exactly! That goes for ANY nation that has it.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Ha ha I knew it. They spared the pretty little Filipino girl. That would just look too barbaric. If they really want to solve the problem execute the users too. Anyway these people were smuggling drugs out of the country. President is a psychopath.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

For a government to put a strain on diplomatic relations because of the bad actions of a few of it's citizens is not a way to run a government. Think of all the honest people from your country (Australia) who could gain from better relations between the two nations. Yet, because a few citzens broke laws in Indonesia which I believe are against the law in Australia you get in a tizzy. Their discipline may be a bit different than yours, but it's theirs to enforce not yours. Of course if these guys were completely innocent and set up, I can understand, but to be willingly doing it, they should take their chances and if caught suffer the consequences.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You should see the media circus in Australia at the moment. I think the fact that Chan & Sukamaran did 10 years BEFORE the execution is what's really rattling people's cages. It's pretty barbaric, but then again you have to respect the local laws. That said, I still can't believe they let Schapelle Corby go...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Everyone has an opinion but a few comments seem really detached from life. Life and death are just words on a page. Unfortunately we react the same way to many stories where someone has lost their life with obvious phrases like "Well, they shouldn't have been..."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One of the unsettling points in the case of the Australians - was the Australian Federal Police knew of the drug operation and informed the Indonesian authorities, knowing full well arrest would probably lead to the death penalty.

It is against Feral Policy in Australia for police to act in such a manner where capital punishment exists and can be applied to Australian citizens.

The logical(?) action to have undertaken would have been to arrest all concerned on return to Aust. making Big Bust headlines, and getting official pats on the backs and societal awards for detective work well done. The arrested would have been brought to trial and spent a good # of years in prison. The anti-drug faction would have scored well.

But no, the Australian plodders were content on chumming it on the global scene without clearly thinking it through.

Now they have lost esteem and support in many of the publics eyes - from what I've heard.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

One lucky Filipina...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

People tend to forget "When in Rome do as the Romans do" Also as a side not. Is a country that represses it's people with Soul crushing Taxes and the threat of taking away home hearth and good standing any better then a government that represses it's people with a gun?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I won't be shedding any tears.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

(CNN)Saudi Arabia has executed a second Indonesian maid despite protests from Jakarta, which is itself facing fierce criticism for its failure to heed calls for clemency for a number of foreigners on death row.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I am glad she is saved. She is one of few convicts that I sympathize of.

@paulinusa

Could this have been the case with others who were executed? Too late for them now. yeah, there is. The first execution of Rini. She and her sisters got planted to bring drugs. Her parents sold their house just could save her sister but not her. so she was executed.

@nostromo

It took 10 years for the Australian government and media to get worked up about this... Yes they broke the law and yes they should have been punished but it would have been more helpful if proper representations had been made to the Indoneasian government during the last 10 years rather than the political grandstanding and threats of the last 6 months.

As far as I know, the court started to execute them because the court was complain about lack of money to pay their expenses. Especially while the drug traffickers got sick, and the court has to pay their hospital fee.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

All of this could have been avoided if countries stepped in to legalise and control the supply of drugs themselves.

Drugs are clearly bad for you, but if people are determined to take them why not let the state supply them? At the very least it takes away the market and cash from the criminals and gangs that run the drugs trade at the moment.

I wouldn't be surprised if politicians were receiving money from said gangs and criminals, hence their opposition to legalisation.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

@Scrote. Lovely name. Good point.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This article is not accurate at all. Here in Brazil, the government is doint its usual business, condemning the execution of the Brazilian national. On the other hand, the vast majority of the 250+ million population is for the execution. What you hear here is "he had it coming", "well done", "we should implement death penalty here", "President Rousseff, please travel to Indonesia carrying some powder", and so on. My personal opinion is that death penalty may be the ultimate injury to any offense. But, I think, how many lives a dealer takes indirectly everytime he sells a gram?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Im sure no matter who gets executed it is obviously grim but walking them through a jungle to their deaths in the middle of the night..it just me raelise how barbaric the whole thing is.But you cant coplain about the indonesians if you dont include the Americans.Chinese, Japanese and all the countries that still execute people.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I think these guys most definitely deserved to do hard time, but the death penalty and firing squad at that? I understand "When in Rome..." I get it, it's their fault, but killing someone over a drug offense, boggles my mind. I think in some rare cases the death penalty might be deserving like murder, rape of a child etc, but I think keeping these people incarcerated, handing out lengthy prison sentences is a better way, but that's just my personal opinion on the matter. Any country that has the death penalty and thinks that it is a solid deterrent is sadly mistaken, drug offenses are going up and more and more people are willing to take that risk in order to make $$$$.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It sounds rather cold but my father would have told me that the executions of criminals who make a living smuggling drugs make the world a better place to live. However, it is scary to think about the possibility of being used by drug smugglers as an unknowing drug mule, so, if you do go to Indonesia, watch your stuff carefully at all times, especially as you're heading out to the airport to leave the country.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I think most sane countries should issue official and strong warning to their citizens; AVOID INDONESIA at all cost. If you still have to go, extreme care is necessary to prevent drugs being planted on you.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Legalise drugs. But also countries have the right to enforce their laws. seems to me that many countries whp protest are guilty of a degree of hypocrisy - want to wage a "war on drugs" but don't want to see any blood spilt in that war? But waging a "war on terror" sees thousands of innocents killed?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Mary Jane Fiesta Veloso is a Filipina woman who was arrested and sentenced to death for allegedly smuggling 2.6 kg of heroin into Indonesia." Thats right INTO Indonesia. Not OUT of Indonesia like the rest of them. Go figure.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Cannot, will not, shall not agree with capital punishment, a sad day; however, at the airports of Indonesia there is a very clear message.

Indonesia should have a 'ARE YOU SURE YOU'RE NOT CARRYING?' zone where people can check their luggage and person one last time, with the help of trained personal, just in case you've been duped and / or suddenly think, 'Man, this is the most selfish stupidest thing I have ever attempted and I want OUT!'

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Any country that has the death penalty and thinks that it is a solid deterrent is sadly mistaken,

It's deterrent enough to me.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I find it ironic that those howling about the death penalty seem to have completely lost sight of what type of drugs these people were smuggling.

It wasn't marijuana or tobacco, it was heroin. Heroin is an opiod. Opiods are the same substance used by many doctors in countries where euthanasia is legal.

So those arguing for legalisation or arguing for the sanctity of life simply don't have a leg to stand on. These criminals provided drugs that allowed addicts to kill themselves slowly, while the criminals made massive profits.

You can't have it both ways. You can't argue against executions while arguing for euthanasia. Choose a side.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

One of those executed had over 50 keys of marijuana, a lucrative substance that is strictly controlled and marketed by gangs affiliated with or protected by the Indonesian Army. Caveat emptor!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Maybe Pacquaio promised to defeat Mayweather this weekend,so they forgave her.Or more likely because she's a woman.

was spared after someone suspected of recruiting her and tricking her into carrying drugs to Indonesia turned herself in to authorities in the Philippines. Yeah right.Who fesses up willingly? The drug dealers would kill you first.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Australia had mounted a sustained campaign to save its citizens, who have been on death row for almost a decade, with Prime Minister Tony Abbott repeatedly appealing for them to be spared.

Before mounting the fruitless campaign against Indonesia, Mr Abbot should acknowledged that Australian Federal Police ticked off the information to Indonesian Police back in 2005. Sharing the intelligence with Indonesia is not the always Australia national interest.

Right now two have been executed. Six have been serving the life sentence in Indonesian Jail. One has been sentenced as twenty years in jail. They are trying to import drug from Bali to Australia. Not the other way around. Aussie will be harmed by imported drugs. Not the Indonesians.

If Mr Abbot and his bureaucrats have some common sense, they should wait until smugglers arrived back in Australia for arrest. They should be punished with Australia law because drug in heading into Australia.

Not young lives will be lost in firing squad. They have shown their remorse through the rehabilitation progress. However their reward for hard work and discipline are bullets

Mr Abbot conservative party was in power back in 2005. It does not make sense for me to Australian Federal Police wanted to send their own boys into the execution island of Indonesia. Those boys death was caused by AFP. AFP has blood in their hands too.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

what's the big deal? lots of people get executed around the world everyday, just because they are Australian? they should've thought about the consequences before they did such stupid things, you don't always get a second chance, don't take it for granted.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

You should see the media circus in Australia at the moment

The Australian media's covering of this event is just as repulsive as the actions taken place. Rolling updates of nothing happening, then rolling updates of nothing happening after the confirmation of the event. I'm sure they'd have run a live telecast and or commentary if they could have the sick vultures that they are.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

but killing someone over a drug offense, boggles my mind.

According to Indonesia, 33 Indonesians die every day from drug abuse. Over the course of a year, that is a lot of deaths, and I can see Indonesia's point in taking extreme actions to curb drug trafficking. Besides those who die, countless people have their lives ruined by drug abuse. It destroys families, leaves children helpless, and has a crippling effect on the bottom rungs of society. How is this for "mind boggling"? Seen from this perspective, no punishment is too harsh.

We hear a lot about the 8 people who were executed last night, but what about the 33 victims who died today from drug abuse? You can argue that the drug abusers died as a result of their own choices, but you can apply the same argument to people who are stupid enough to traffic in drugs in a country which executes drug traffickers.

Whether Indonesia was right or wrong in executing these people is beside the point, Indonesia has the right to make it's own laws, and enforce their laws as they are written. Were I Mr Abbot and Australia, I would not shed a tear for these two "Australians", as these guys certainly didn't care about the lives they ruined or destroyed by peddling drugs. You can certainly bet that drug traffickers will think twice about plying their trade in Indonesia in the future, and perhaps fewer people will die from abusing drugs.

Five Japanese citizens have been executed in China for drug trafficking over the past 5 years, but there has been no outcry from Japan or the Japanese. Whatever their differences in other things, Japan and China seem to be in agreement on dealing swiftly and harshly with drug traffickers.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@sangetsu: you are completely right. Good train of thought.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

So Smith Japan executed 3 people in 2015 while the USA executed 49 people and holds 25 percent of the prisoner population in the world. The "land of the Fee" is what I call it and am just waiting on the chance to go home. Then again my ancestors land is under military occupation of the USA. There is that country again who kills and who's prison population is a commodity for US Corporations to make money. The USA holds 707 people prisoner per 100,000 while the People Republic of China holds 172. The sad fact is the USA holds about the same percentage of prisoners as the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea.

So I am suppose to bow to a citizen from a country who has the same percentage of its population in prison like North Korea? You know Smith perhaps Japan should stop all executions and join the rest of the free world.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

And the Indonesians want to ban alcohol as well? People going to get the death penalty for slipping a mickey into their bags now too?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The laws of Indonesia are very well known, and at least one of those guys knew the law because they had been there several times before with the suspicion being that they were doing the same thing - they didn't get caught first time around.

The Australian media has, over time gone from treating and depicting them as drug traffickers and criminals to good hearted men who have reformed over the course of 10 years - and that may well have been the case. Sukamaran turned out to be a respectable artist who has produced some unique works from a unique situation that will certainly have cultural gravitas.

Perhaps one of the big questions should be: Why spend 10 years attempting to reform the men, having them do everything they can to respond to that, only to kill them anyway? It seems sadistic - to the men, their families and friends.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The USA holds 707 people prisoner per 100,000 while the People Republic of China holds 172. The sad fact is the USA holds about the same percentage of prisoners as the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea.

More than 10,000,000 illegal aliens live in America, and a large percentage of prisoners in American prisons are illegal aliens. 27% of prisoners in the federal prison system are illegal aliens, among all prisons in America, illegal aliens make up 17% of the population. This is astonishing when you consider that illegal aliens make up 2% of the American population. Many of these people came to America to escape justice or punishment for crimes in their home countries, and once in America, they continue committing crimes.

We have no idea how many people are imprisoned in China or North Korea, the numbers they publish are not very likely the actual numbers. North Korea executed 15 high level officials last week, there is no telling how many ordinary people are executed over the course of a year.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@sangatsu. I understand your earlier post about the high number of drug related deaths in Indonesia. However, I would be interested to know who these people were and why they took drugs. Did they come from poverty or were they from stable environments? In the case of these deaths they can't blame it totally on foreigners exporting drugs. For me the problem is within Indonesia itself, in regards to the supply. I don't agree that the executions will deter would-be traffickers totally and I' m almost certain it won't curb drug related deaths in Indonesia. To do that they need to look a lot closer to home and look for bigger fish.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Executions will have no effect on the drug trade in Indonesia for the simple reason that it is a very lucrative business, but one controlled by the Indonesian army and police ( an inconvenient truth that most JT posters seem blissfully unaware of, or do not want to accept since this fact only undermines their support of the death penalty for small-fry traffickers - it's a no-brainer that these two powerful state organizations are 100% immune from prosecution.) These phony "patriots" are the ones responsible for dealing death to the desperately poor. No surprise here because Indonesians have learned nothing from their bloody recent history which they appear doomed to repeat.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why traveling to Indonesia if u have issue in drugs? No One's smarter if the immigration and X-ray machines work out ...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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